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Keramic Studio 

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR THE 

CHINA PAINTER AND 

POTTER 



Volume Fourteen 

MAY 1912 to APRIL 1913 INCLUSIVE 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



{All Rights Reserved) 



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RERAMIC STUDIO— Index 



FLOWER STUDIES— NATURALISTIC AND DECORATIVE 



MAY 1912 

Fuschia Vensuta Lucy M. Shover 

Siberian Crabapple Blossoms Lillian Sturges 

Violet Study Alice W. Donaldson,.. 

Wild Sun Flower K. E. Cherry 

Larkspur E. N. Harlow 

Huckleberry E. N. Harlow 

Witch Hazel Anne H. Brinton 

Coxinia Ahce W. Donaldson... 

Cat TaUs Alice W. Donaldson... 

Crabapples Ahce W. Donaldson.. 

JUNE 1912 

Lily of the Valley H. P. Foulla-od 

Japanese Quince Jeanne M. Stewart 

Iron Weed Mary Overbeck 

Golden Rod WiU Rannells 

Barberries Kate Clark Greene 

Pink Carnations, photo by Walter Stillman 

Honeysuckle Edith Alma Ross 

JULY 1912 

Iron Weed Kathryn E. Cherry.... 

Jerusalem Rose Harriette B. Burt 

Nasturtiums V. T. Simkms 

Dogwood Lucy M. Shover 



PAGE 

2 

3 

7 

11 

17 

21 

22 

24 

25 

25 



26 
27 
34 
37 
38 
41 
45 



67 
70 



SEPTEMBER 1912 

Mt. Hood LUy Jeanne M. Stewart 97 

Alder, photo by Walter Stillman 98 

Butterfly Studies Georgia B. Spainhower and 

Edna Mann Shover 100-101 

Forget-Me-Nots V. Simkms : 102 

Pyretlu-um, photo by Walter Stillman 103 

Radish Blossom and Seed A. W. Donaldson 104 

Ghost Flower or Indian Pipe, photo by .Walter Stillman 108 

Sumac Kathryn E. Cherry 109 

Sassafras A. W. Donaldson 110 

Scarlet Sage A. W. Donaldson 112 

Scarlet Sage Harriette B. Burt 113 

Clematis Harriette B. Burt 114 

OCTOBER 1912 

Green Grapes Kathryn E. Cherry 123 

Red Grapes Kathryn E. Cherry 124-125 

Blue Grapes Kathryn E. Cherry 126 

Conventional Grape Panel Olga Sorensen 127 

Dahlias Harriette B. Burt 129 

Elderberry Jeanne M. Stewart 131 

Evening Primrose A. W. Donaldson 134 

Amaryllis A. W. Donaldson 134 

NOVEMBER 1912 

Mountain Ash A. W. Heckman 139 

Double and Triple Columbine, photo by Walter Stillman 141 



PAGE 

Columbine V. Simkins : 143 

Mountain Laurel Harriette B. Burt 145 

Cherries Jeanne M. Stewart 147 

Long Spurred Columbine, photo by Walter Stillman 149 

Study of Snow Ball Flower Daisy Zug 151 

Harrison Yellow Rose, photo by Walter Stillman 156 

DECEMBER 1912 

Blue Bells Harriette B. Burt 159 

Delphiniums, photos by Walter Stillman..... 164-165 

Campanula or Chimney Bell Flower, 

photo by Walter Stillman 169 

Monk's Hood Harriette B. Burt 173 

JANUARY 1913 

Iris, Lohengrin, photo by Walter StUlman 191 

Iris, Pallida Dalmatica, photo by Walter Stillman 192 

Iris, Mme. Chereau, photo by Walter Stillman 193 

Iris, Jacquesiana, photo by Walter Stillman 194 

FEBRUARY 1913 

Chrysanthemum, photo by Walter Stillman 203 

Salpaglossis, photo by Walter Stillman 209 

Galdioli, photo by Walter Stillman 213 

Gladioli Harriette B. Burt 215 

Bachelor's Button, photo by Walter Stillman 219 

Phlox, photo by Walter Stillman 221 

MARCH 1913 

Hydrangea Margaret Overbeck 228 

Stock Jilly Mabel E. Head 229 

Lady Shpper Edna S. Cave 234 

Brodiaea J. M. Culbertson 238 

Yellow Mariposa Lilies J. M. Culbertson 239 

Yellow and Phik Sand Verbenas J. M. Culbertson 240 

Border, California Poppy Ida A. Johnson 241 

Border, Manzanita Ida A. Johnson 241 

Border, Mimulus J. M. Culbertson 241 

Matihja Poppy Ida A. Johnson 242 

WUd Hollyhock J. M. Culbertson 243 

Lanterns of The Faii-ies J. M. Culbertson 245 

Bitter Sweet Harriette B. Burt 246 

APRIL 1913 

Poetaz Narcissus, photo by Walter Stillman 250 

Narcissus Harriette B. Burt 251 

Cottage Tulips, photo by Walter Stillman .'. 257 

Freesia Harriette B. Burt 260 

Crown and Trumpet Narcissus, photo 

by Walter Stillman 265 

French Tuberose Harriette B. Burt 267 

Cherry Blossoms Lillian Sturges 268 



MISCELLANEOUS 



MAY 1912 
Decoration of Pottery in the Clay State 



Pate-sur-Pate. . 



..F. A. Rhead 13-16 

JUNE 1912 

Exhibit of Buffalo Society of Mineral 

Painters 31-33 

Helpful Hints Lela Chandler and Gertrude 

Gilpin 34 



Decoration of Pottery in the Clay State 

Pate-sur-Pate, continued F. A. Rhead 42 

JULY 1912 
Decoration of Pottery ui the Clay State 

Pate-sur-Pate, concluded F. A. Rhead 47^8 

NO\^iMBER 1912 

Kansas City Exhibit - 154-155 

Burlingame California Class of 

Miss Lola Willits 155 



RERAMIC SrVDlO-Index 



MISCELLANEOUS— Continued 



DECEMBER 1912 PAGE 

Place Card Alice B. Sharrard 158 

Burley Exhibition 166 

Place Cards Alice B. Sharrard 176 

Menu Cards Alice B. Sharrard 177 

JANUARY 1913 

Chicago Ceramic Art Club Exhibit lone Wieeler 188-190 

Arts and Crafts Exhibition of Chicago 

Art Institute B. Bennett 195-200 

Helpful Hmts Orilla E. Miner and Mrs. H. G. 



Huffman... 



EnameHng 

Helpful Hints.. 



FEBRUARY 1913 PAGE 

Dorothea Warren-O'Hara 204-208 

Mrs. Earl Ramsey and Florence 

Huntington 222-223 



MARCH 1913 



Helpful Hints. 



..Gertrude Gilpin 
Clemens 



and M. E. 



APRIL 1913 



199 Helpful Hints Elmor Brierly... 



CONVENTIONAL 



MAY 1912 

Lesson for Beginners in Semi-Con- 
ventional and Lustres for a 
Bon Bon Dish Jessie M. Bard 

Cake Plate A. L. B. Cheney 

Cup and Saucer Edith E. Long 

Plates Evelyn Beachey 

Jelly Jar and Plate Henrietta B. Paist 

■ Creamer and Sugar Bowl Hem-ietta B. Paist 

-Round Boxes Edith Alma Ross 

Sugar and Creamer Adah S. Murphy 

Salt Shaker Leah H. Rodman 

Plate L. R. Lightner 

Design for Peacock Stencil 

Plate H. E. Hodgdon 

Plate 

Border for Stencil Study 

Design for Jelly Jar and Plate Mrs. Dante C. Babbitt,. 

JUNE 1912 

Lessons for Beginners in Realistic and 

Conventional Combined for Coffee 

Pot Jessie M. Bard 

Plate lone Wlieeler 

Rectangular Box Georgia B. Spamhower... 

Open Bon Bon Box Design Frances E. Newman 

Round Box Winifred S. Gettemy 

All Over Design M. W. Caudle 

Jardiniere, Egyptian Design Paul Piering 

Monograms Ahce E. Woodman 

Pitcher, Daisy Design Hannah Overbeck.. 

Bowl Border Abbott McClure 

A. D. Cup and Saucer Alice Seymour 

DogwOod Border Conventionalized Ai-ka B. Fowler 

Sugar and Creamer, Buttercups Henrietta B. Paist 

Bowl with Red Berries Pearl Monro 

Plate, Cup and Saucer Clara L. Connor .•... 

Jam Jar Adah S. Murphy 

Flower Bowl Alice B. Sharrard 

A. D. Cup and Saucer Hallie Day 

Plate, Nasturtiums Mrs. W. L. Rice '. 

JULY 1912 

Design Elizabeth Scroggs 

Plate Border Ray E. Motz 

Large Pitcher Ray E. Motz 

Plate Albert J. Rott 

Plate Ray E. Motz... 



AUGUST 1912 



2-4 

5 

6 

8 

9 

10 

12 

12 

12 

16 

18 

19 

20 

20 

24 



26-28 
29 
30 
30 
30 
30 
33 
34 
35 
35 
36 
36 
38 
39 
40 
42 
43 
43 
44 



48 

.50 

51 

53 

55 

Miss M. M. Mason's Design Class 48-68 

Plate Border Ray E. Motz 58 

Border Albert J. Rott 58 

Plate Lockwood WiUiams 59 

Plate Albert J. Rott 61 

Borders Daisy B. Horton, Anna Mc- 

Intjo-e and Eliz. Scroggs 62 

Plate Albert J. Rott 63 

Plate LuluS. Price 65 

Plates Albert J. Rott 66-68 

Plate ElIaFaber 69 



Designs of Class Work of Chicago Ai-t 

Institute 72-74, 77, 82, 83 

Plate Alice Osland 75 

Coupe Plate Laura L. Stoddard 76 

Plate Leo J. KuU 78 

Bowl Design Marguerite Meachem 79 

Plate Violet Harvey 80 

Salad Bowl Edith Kredell 81 

Dresser Tray Lucile Turner 84 

Plate Martha Wistrand 84 

Plate A. M. Hardman 85 

SedjiBowl Edith Kredell 86 

Cylinder Vase Laura J. Stoddard 86 

Vases Carrie Nelson and Violet Viant... 87 

Dre.sser Tray Lois Boston 87 

Tea Set Lethia Brownson 88 

Dresser Tray Helen G. Morrow 89 

Dresser Set Mildred Brown 90 

Rim Plate Mildred Brown 91 

Sedji Sugar and Creamer Marie Claybaugh 92 

SEPTEMBER 1912 

Ai'ts and Crafts Exhibition of Orange, 

N. J 94-96 

Round Box Hallie Day 94 

Creamer and Sugar Winifred S. Gettemy 96 

Butterfly Design for Plate Georgia B. Spainhower 99 

Bowl Olga Sorensen 99 

Butterfly Border Designs Georgia B. Spainhower 100 

Newark Society of Keramic Arts 105-107 

Lesson for Beginner in Gold and Lustre 

for a Vase Jessie M. Bard 110 

Vase Jessie M. Bard Ill 



OCTOBER 1912 

Four Winds Pottery Summer School 115-122 

Plate Design, Black-eyed Susan E. L. Baker 128 

128 

130 

130 

132 

133 



Tobacco Jar Paul Piering 

Rectangular Box Adah S. Murphy... 

A. D. Cup and Saucer Clara L. Connor... 

Plate .Edith Alma Ross... 

Bowl or Round Tile Pearl Monro 



NO^'EMBER 1912 

Borders A. W. Heckman... 

Plate A. W. Heckman... 

Tea Caddy and Bowl A. W. Heckman... 

Plate and Sugar Bowls A. W. Heckman... 



136 

137 

138 

140 

Plates, Cups and Saucers A. W. Heckman 142-144 

Cup and Saucer A. W. Heckman 146 

Plates, Cups and Saucers A. W. Heckman 148-150-152 

Cup and Saucer A. W. Heckman 153 



HERAMIC SrUDlO-Index 

CONVENTIONAL-Continticd 



DECEMBER 1912 PAGE 

Lesson for Beginners in Enamels Jessie M. Bard 158-160 

Poinsettia Plate A. W. Sloan 160 

Salad Bowl M. C. McCormick 161 

Salt and Pepper Kate Clark Green 161 

Cup and Saucer Clara L. Connor 162 

Sugar Bowl Clara L. Connor 162 

Sugar Bowl Mrs. M. W. Caudle 163 

Melon Bowl L. H. Rodman 163 

Plate Border Ruth M. Ruck 166 

Chocolate Pot Craftsman's Guild 167 

Child's Set, Frogs Alice B. Sharrard 168 

Tankard, Peacock and Wistaria Henrietta B. Paist 170 

Celery Salts Alice B. Sharrard 171 

Salt and Pepper Shaker Ruth M. Ruck 171 

Borders for Cups and Saucers Helen Coohdge 171 

Plate Walter Karl Fitze 172 

Medallions for Bonbonniereor TeaTileM. W. Caudle ]72 

Fruit Bowl Henrietta B. Paist 174 

Sandwich Tray A. Krebs 175 

.Plate Mary L. Brigham 178 

JANUARY 1913 

Lunch Set, First Prize A. W. Heckman 180, 182 

Plate and Chop Plate for Lunch Set.. ..A. W. Heckman 181 

Pepper Shaker Albert Heckman 182 

Breakfast Set, First Prize Jetta Ehlers 182, 183, 184 

Dinner Set, First Prize Ella Miriam Wood 185, L86, 187 

FEBRUARY 1913 

Cover for Round Box Margaret Latham 202 

Tobacco Thermidor Hallie Day 210 

Hollyhock Vase and Bowl Henrietta B. Paist 211 

Candlestick Craftsman's Guild 212 

Plate Winifred Gettemy 214 

Hat Pin Holder Winifred Gettemy 216 

Borders Chas. Babcock 216 

Design for Border Clara Conner 216 



PAGE 

Rose Border Katharine Soderberg 216 

Mistletoe Border Ruth M. Ruck 216 

Vase Mrs. G. R. Monro 217 

Jelly Plate M. C. McCormick 218 

Plate lone Wheeler 220 

Plate Mary L. Brigham , 222 

Full Size Section of Plate. L. R. Lightner 223 

MARCH 1913 

Design Kathryn E. Cherry 226-228 

Bowl, Gourd Motif Henrietta B. Paist 227 

Service Plate M. W. Caudle 230-231 

Salad Bowl, Miner's Lettuce 233 

Salt Shakers A. W. Heckman 235 

Cup and Saucer A. W. Heckman 235 

Plate Designs Maud Chapin 236 

Bowl Designs, Insect Motif Daisy Zug 237 

Border, Mission Bells J. M. Culbertson 238 

Border, Mimulus Ida A. Johnson 238 

Plate, Wild Hollyhock Motif J. M. Culbertson 244 

Small Bowl Design Frances E. Newman 245 

APRIL 1913 

Bonbonniere Ophelia Foley 248 

Pompano Fish Panel H. L. Bridwell 249 

Dinner Set F. R. Weisskopf 252-254 

Nut Bowl May B. Hoelschler 254-255 

Cup and Saucer F. R. Weisskopf 256 

Cup and Saucer Mrs. Georgia D. Kimmons 256 

Honey Jar Clara L. Connor 258 

Soup Bowl, Turtles Alice B. Sharrard 2.59 

Decorated Porcelain Matilda Voorhees 261 

Vase, Egyptian Motif Edna Mann Shover 262 

Plate Henrietta B. Paist 263 

Marmalade Jar Craftsman's Guild 264 

Blue and White Plates Yukey R. Tanaka '. 266 



SUPPLEMENTS 



Treatment on page 

Yellow Hollyhock Mary H. Fewsmith May 1912 10 

Cherokee Roses Kathryn E. Cherry June 1912 46 

Salad Bowls M. M. Mason July 1912 52-54 

Colored Study of Buttercups Marie Bohman August 1912 72 

White Poppies Kathryn E. Cherry. September 1912 98 

Amaryllis Alice W. Donaldson October 1912 134 

Snap Dragon Harriette B. Burt November 1912 142 



Treatment on page 

Wintergreen Berries H. E. Hanscom December 1912 178 

Golden Rod Walter S. Stillman January 1913 

Gladioli Joseph Kallaus February 1913 

Wild Asters C. L. Wiard March 1913 

Pompano Fish Panel H. L. Bridwell } 

Bonbonniere Fish Design Ophelia Foley f '^P"' ^^^'^ 



190 
222 

245 

248 



■^•, / Y- / 





The entire contrats of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright.and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF MAY, J9I2 



Editorial 

Fuchsia Venusta 

Lesson for Beginners in Semi-Conventional and Lustres for a 

Bon Bon Dish 
Siberian Crabapple Blossoms 
Design for a Cake Plate 
Cup and Saucer 
Violet Study 
Plates 

Jelly Jar and Plate, Currant Motif 
Hollyhock (Supplement) 
Creamer and Sugar Bowl, Rose Tree Design 
Wild Sun Flower 
Round Box, Lili(es 
Salt Shaker 
Sugar and Creamer 

The Decoration of Pottery in the Clay State, Pate-sur-Pate 
Plate 
Larkspur 

Design for Peacock Stencil 
Plate 

Plate, Square Flower Form 
Border for Stencil 
Huckleberry 
Witch Hazel 
Cozina 

Design for Jelly Jar and Plate 
Answers to Correspondents 
Conventional Cat-Tails and Crab Apple 



Lucy Marie Shaver 

Jessie M. Bard 
Lillian Sturges 
A. L. B. Cheney 
Edith E, Long 
Alice W. Donaldson 
Evelyn Beachey 
Henrietta Paist 
Mary H. Fewsmith 
Henrietta Paist 
K. E. Cherry 
Edith Alma Ross 
Leah H. Rodman 
Adah S. Murphy 
F. A. Rhead 
L. R. Lightner 
E. N. Harlow 

H. E. Hodgdon 



E. N. Harlow 
Anne H. Brinton 
Alice W. Donaldson 
Mrs. Dante C. Babbitt 

Alice W. Donaldson 



Page 

J 
2 

2,4 
3 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
10 

n 
n 

12 
12 
13-15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
24 
25 



/6" dt 

THE OLD RELIABLE HOd^ FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




•e 



No. 2 Sizcf4xJ2in. $30.00) 

No. 3 Size J6 x J9 in 40.00 \ Gas Kiln 2 sizes 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



/ No. f Size 10 X 12 in. ${5.00 

Cfaarcoal Kiln 4 sizes. ^°' 2 Size 16 x 12 in. 20.00 



) No. 3 Size 16 x J5 in... 
\No.4 Size 18 X 26 in... 



25.00 
50.00 



Springfield, Ohio 



-y 



Vot XIV. No. I 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



May I9I2 




HIRTEEN is usually considered an 
unlucky number and hand in hand 
with Friday is what is called in slang 
phrase "the limit." Possibly it is 
because of a "contrary" disposition, 
but, whatever the cause, that combi- 
nation has always been auspicious 
for the editor. So it is with pleasant 
expectations that we announce the 
thirteenth birthday of Ke/ramic Studio. 
We shall be anticipating all sorts of pleasant surprises, the best 
of luck and the best issues we have ever had in every way. 



The editor has secured for the new year some more fine 
photographic studies of flowers which will be of the greatest 
value to designers, every detail being clearly brought out, while 
we are also anticipating some fine flower studies from the edi- 
tor's garden when the summer school meets at Four Winds 
Pottery, and more good designs from Mrs. Cherry's design class 
in the same summer school; which reminds us that we will 
soon be able to show Keramic Studio readers the work of an- 
other prominent teacher, well known to you, in the class work 
of the Duquesne Club under the instruction of Miss Maud 
Mason. 



Bragging is a sad fault, but because it is full of promise to 
Keramic Studio readers, we want to tell you all the flowers in 
the "editorial" garden, of which you may expect studies for 
we shall have helpful illustrations of all that blossom from 
early spring to winter. And there are plenty of them, for the 
editor herself has planted them ail from thousands of seedlings 
started in the sunny south windows of the pottery. At the 
present writing, April 4th, we have just picked a handful of 
Giant Snowdrops which begin the floral procession and are 
closely followed by Crocus, Jonquils and Daffodils, Hycinths, 
Narcissus and Tulips of every kind and color. The Trumpet, 
Crown and Cup Narcissus, the Cottage early and late, double 
and single, Parrot and Darwin Tulips. Before the bulbs have 
stopped blooming, the perennials begin, the Yellow Primrose 
and graceful drooping bells of the blue Mertensia, the lilacs, 
double and single of every shade from white to deep blue 
purple, from pale pink to purplish red. The pansies already are 
struggling to blossom under their winter cover, will blossom 
all summer except for a short time in August. Now come the 
June flowers, German Iris, Peonies, Columbines, single and 
double and the newer long spurred varieties which dance 
in the breeze like fairies. The Lily of the Valley is then cai-- 
peting the ground and the Water Lilies, white, pink and yel- 
low, make shade for the gold fish in the water garden. The 
Forget-me-nots, white, pink and blue, blossom bravely around 
the water's edge and along the garden path the Canterbury 
Bells nod their heads in shades of pink, blue and white. There 
are the single and double kinds, and loveliest of all the "Cup and 
Saucer." Behind them are tall rows of Foxgloves, pink and 
white, against a backgi-ound of gi'ape arbors. Another path 



is bordered with blue Delphiniums and white Madonna Lilies, 
and behind them is a gorgeous color scheme of yellow Coreopsis 
and scarlet Oriental Poppies. In the border you will find 
Sweet Williams and Lupin, pink and white Shirley Poppies and 
Bachelor Buttons, Bell Flowers, blue and white, with English 
Daisies at your feet. In the meantime, the procession of roses 
has begun with the first grand display of June Roses, followed 
by the Briars and Climbing Roses, Wichirianas and Ramblers. 
Then come the Hybrid Teas, which blossom until frost. There 
are some three hundred roses in the garden and about two 
hundred varieties. By the time the Roses are well on the way, 
the Japanese Iris begin, followed in quick succession by the 
Day Lilies, white, blue and yellow. Snapdragon in all colors, 
Salpiglossis, Yucca, Bleeding Heart, Fraxmilla, Pentstemon, 
Hollyhocks, Physostegia, with long spikes of dainty pink; 
Asters of the Comet type, striped pink and white, purple and 
white and yellow, Auratum and Speciosum Lilies, Auchusa 
like giant Forget-me-nots, Phlox, Aconitim, Achillea, Lilium 
Canadense, yellow and red Lychnis and Mourning Bride, 
Tiger Lilies, Feverfew and Pyrethrum, Gladiolas, Gaillardias, 
Cardinal Flower and Veronica. Dahlias, Anemones and Chrys- 
anthemums close the garden parade, and the silver shields of 
Honesty. 

And in the meantime we must not forget about the orchard 
blossoms and a hundred varieties of flowering shrubs that are 
not only beautiful but paintable and that blossom successively 
from spring to fall, many carrying attractive berries far into 
the winter, and the vines which clothe the house in Honeysuckle 
and Wistaria. Does this read a good deal like a nurseryman's 
catalogue? Well, we confess it is almost impossible to resist 
buying everything that is so attractively set before us in the 
beautifully illustrated catalogues sent out just now. Really 
they are quite worth while "collecting" for the illustrations, if 
one has not the garden for inspiration. And just a postscript 
to say that the fruit garden is not to be despised as a source of 
inspiration, for we have Strawberries, Currants, red, white and 
black; Gooseberries, Blackberries, also White Blackberries, 
red and yellow Raspberries, Wine Berries, Cherries, Plums, 
Apricots, Peaches, Pears, Apples and Quinces and Grapes, 
big and little, white, red and purple. Neither is the vegetable 
garden without its artistic interest, but we will refer you for 
that to the seedsman's book as a rather quicker process than 
recounting their names on this page. 

We would be glad if every teacher expecting to hold a 
summer school would notify us so that we could give the 
details in the June issue of Keramic Studio for the benefit of our 
readers who wish to do summer studying. If the dates are 
different, it would be possible for one student to spend some 
time at two or more schools if they desired, thus getting a 
variety both in instruction and scenery. There is no doubt 
that the Chautauqua Vance Phillips School, the Fry School 
and others will be open as usual and we would be glad to pub- 
lish in the magazine a list of them all with date of opening and 
closing. The Chicago Art Institute Summer School opens 
July 1st, 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




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FUCHSIA VENUSTA— LUCY MARIE SHAVER 
(Treatment page 16) 



LESSON FOR BEGINNERS IN SEMI-CONVENTIONAL 
AND LUSTRES FOR A BON-BON DISH 

Jessie M. Bard 

TO divide the top of the box find the center first by lay- 
ing a narrow strip of straight edge paper horizontally 
across and find the exact width of the box, then fold the 
paper in half and place a mark where the center is, then 
place the paper on the box again and put a mark on the box 
opposite to the one on the paper, then place the paper verti- 
cally on the box and mark the center as you did before and 
the center is where these two marks cross. 

Next get the measurement around the edge of the lid 
and fold the paper in five equal parts, mark off the five 
spaces on the lid then lay the straight edge of the paper on 
the lid between the center mark and one of the outer spaces 
so the paper lies perfectly flat and mark a fine India ink 
line along the edge of the paper. Repeat this in the five 
sections. 

Take a piece of tracing paper and make a careful trac- 
ing of the section between the two dotted lines and trace in 
the design according to instructions given in the first lesson 
then go over all of the lines with a fine grey India ink line 
following the instructions given in the previous lesson. 
All of the dark grey tones, except the buds and the centers 
of the flowers, are White Gold. 

Be sure to have everything perfectly clean for this work. 
Keep brushes for gold work only; do not use them for color 
also. For the smaller spaces use a Windsor and Newton or 
a Reubens red sable No. 1 brush and for the larger spaces a 
No. 3 square shader camel's hair brush. 

Take a little of the gold from the slab and put it on 
another piece of glass, add a few drops of Garden Lavender 
oil and mix it through thoroughly with a palette knife. The 
gold should be the consistency of thick cream and should 
work easily from the brush. It will be necessary to add more 
Lavender oil occasionally while you work when the gold 
becomes too stiff. White gold should be applied in rather 
a thin wash; it does not burnish well when applied too 
heavy. When you have painted in all of the White gold in 
the center put in the darkest spaces with Roman gold and 
then continue with the White gold in the outer border. This 
is done in order to leave a resting place for the finger while 
working which could not be done if all of the White gold was 
put on first. 

Second Fire — Burnish the gold with a glass brush, then 
go over the entire surface, gold and all, of both the top and 
bottom of the box with Light Green Lustre. Great care 
should be used in working with lustres as they are very 
treacherous. Be sure that the china is free from dust and 
fingermarks. It should be cleaned with alcohol. Turpentine 
should never be used with lustres in any way. 

Brushes that are used for lustre should not be used for 
anything else and should be thoroughly cleaned each time 
they are used before putting them away. To do this clean 
the lustre out of the brush well with turpentine and then 
clean it well with alcohol to take out all of the turpentine, 
then rub the brush across the palm of the hand until it is 
perfectly dry. 

Have a clean silk pad ready then pour out a little 
Light Green Lustre in a small dish; a china slant is best. 
Add a few drops of Lavender oil to it. The amount of oil to 
be added depends on the tone of green desired; the more 
lavender is used the greyer the color will be. Paint the 
luster on quite heavy with a No. 8 square shader, work as 
quickly as possible as it dries rapidly and will show the brush 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





%l 



}0r3iiK) ^J)¥'■if'rG?' 



r 



SIBERIAN CRABAPPLE BLOSSOMS— LILLIAN STURGES 



SKETCH design in carefully, then paint leaves with Apple Third Fire— Paint background with Violet and Apple 

Green and Shading Green; the flowers are painted in Green, then paint the blossoms with Rose, Lemon Yellow in 

with a very delicate wash of Blood Red. centers; the stamens are Blood Red and a little Violet. Touch 

Second Fire— Outline design with Grey for Flesh and fire, up the leaves with Shading Green and Moss Green. 



heramic studio 



marks, then pad it until it looks perfectly even. Sometimes 
it is necessary to wait a minute or two before padding to allow 
it to dry slightly; if padded too soon it will lift off all of the 
lustre and if not soon enough it will become too dry so that the 
pad has no effect on it; this can only be learned by experience. 

If you have never used lustres it would be best to experi- 
ment on a small piece of plain china first and have it fired be- 
fore attempting it on this box. After the lustre has been 
padded on the box wipe it from the buds and outer petals of 
the flowers; use the end of a brash handle for this, wrap a small 
piece of cotton tightly over it and moisten it slightly. If the 



lustre is too dry to come off easily in this way, moisten the 
cotton with a little alcohol, press the cotton against a piece 
of cloth so that very little alcohol remains in it; if too much 
alcohol is used it will spread when applied to the china. 

Great care must be taken not to touch the lustre with the 
fingers as every finger mark will show, and also keep it free from 
dust. Give this a hot fire. 

Third Fire— Go over all the White Gold and also the 
Rom.an Gold again. Put a wash of Yellow Lustre over the 
buds and flowers. Do not put it on too heavy. Give this a 
medium fire. 




A. 




BON-BON DISH— JESSIE M. BARD 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




DESIGN FOR A CAKE PLATE— A. L. B. CHENEY 



"pAINT flowers with Albert Yellow. Leaves, band around 
-t center and larger space in outer border Apple Green, 
a little Yellow Green and a little Shading Green. 

Second Fire — Oil over background in center and all 



parts of border not yet painted and dust with two parts Aztec 
Blue one part Banding Blue, two parts Pearl Grey. 

Third Fire — Oil over entire surface with Fry's Special Oil and 
dust with three parts Pearl Grey and one-half part Grey for Flesh. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



M^. 




CUP AND SAUCER— EDITH E. LONG 



o 



IL entire surface of cup and saucer with Fry's Special 

Oil and dust with Pearl Grey and a touch of Yellow. 

Second Fire — Trace in design and paint leaves with 



Apple Green and a little Yellow Green. White enamel to 
which has been added a very little Albert Yellow to make it 
a cream color. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




VIOLET STUDY— ALICE WILLITS DONALDSON 



PAINT violets with Violet No. 2 and a little Banding Blue. 
Lemon Yellow in centers. The leaves are Apple Green, 
Yellow Green and Shading Green. The dark places on leaves 
are Shading Green with a little Black. Paint background 



with Violet, Copenhagen Blue, Sea Green. 

Second Firing — Use the same colors as used in first fir- 
ing. Keep the light sides of flowers delicate, shade the shadow 
side. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE— EVELYN BEACHEY 



GREY part of design two thin washes of Hasburg's White 
Gold. Dark parts three parts Copenhagen Blue, two 
parts Pearl Grey and one-half part Sea Green. Outline in 



Copenhagen Blue and a little Sea Green. Light background 
in border, Opal Lustre flowed on very heavy. 






PLATE— EVELYN BEACHEY 



OUTLINE design in Shading Green and a little Moss Green. 
Paint in dark parts of design with Moss Green and a 
little Violet No. 2. 



Second Fire. — Oil over entire plate with Fry's Special 
oil, pad until tacky and when partly dry dust with Pearl 
Grey and a very little Albert Yellow. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





JELLY JAR AND PLATE, CURRANT MOTIF— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



Background White or Ivory. Stems, Yellow Brown dulled with a touch of Black; leaves, Olive Green; pale currants Deep 

Red Brown, veined and outlined with Gold. 



10 



heramic studio 



HOLLYHOCK— (Supplement) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
/^UTLINE design with Grey for Flesh, then fire. Paint 
V-/ flowers with Lemon Yellow, Yellow Brown and a little 
Apple Green. The buds are Yellow Brown, Brown Green 
and a little Auburn Brown. The leaves are Moss Green, 
Brown Green and Shading Green. Stems are Yellow Green 
and Yellow Brown. The background is Violet, Yellow Brown 
and Brown Green. 

Third Fire — Use same colors used in the first firing. 
The flowers are shaded toward centers with Brown Green 
and Yellow Brown. The shadow side use Albert Yellow. 
For the leaves, give them a clean wash of Yellow Green and 
touch in the Shading Green and Brown Green. 



WILD SUN -FLOWER (Page 17) 

K. E. Cherry 
pAINT flowers with Lemon Yellow shaded with Yellow 
•*- Brown and Brown Green. The centers with Yellow 
Brown and Auburn Brown. Stems are reddish brown; for 
this use Blood Red and Violet. On the shadow side use Brown 
Green with the Blood Red. The leaves are Moss Green, 
Shading Green and Yellow Green. The background is Yel- 
low Brown and Brown Green. 

Second Fire— Shade the flowers with Albert Yellow and 
Yellow Brown and a little Auburn Brown. The leaves are 
Yellow Green and Shading Green. 






CREAMER AND SUGAR BOWL, ROSE TREE DESIGN— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



Background Ivory. Roses Capucine Red, very thin. Leaves Olive Green mixture; stems Yellow Brown softened 

with Black. Gold outline. 




MAY J9ia 

SUPPLEM ENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



YELLOW HOLLYHOCK-MARY H. fewsmith 



COPYRIGHT 1912 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACUSE . N. V. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



ii 




WILD SUN-FLOWER— K. E. CHERRY 



(Treatment page JO) 



12 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





ROUND BOX— LILIES 

Edith Alma Ross 

THE box is intended for a little Easter gift or prize for an 
Easter party. Outline the lilies and leaves, put in the 
stamens and the line on edge of the flower and top of box with 
firm line of good gold and fire. Float in the lilies with a 
smooth wash of white enamel to which has been added a little 
Violet of Gold to give a soft lavender tint. Put in the leaves 
with enamel tinted a delicate shade of green. The pale wash 
in the spaces between leaves is a thin tint of Violet of Gold. 
This design is good for all gold on a tinted ground or over 
pure white. 




SALT SHAKER— LEAH H. RODMAN 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

TRACE in the design, then put in all leaves with Green 
gold. Then paint in the flower form which is in the 
center of the four leaves with equal parts of Apple Green and 
Yellow Green and also the stems and the vertical lines between 
the sections. Bands around the neck are of gold. 



1*' 



^ 



SUGAR AND CREAMER 

Adah S. Murphy 

FLOWERS and leaves outlined in black, also bands. 
Flowers and leaves to be done in enamel and shaded, 
leaving the light on the top of flower. Of the three largest 
flowers, make the upper one blue, the one under mulberry 
and the one under that red. Leaves green. Little daisies, 
upper one white, under one blue, other flowers red and blue, 
gold bands. 




SUGAR AND CREAMER— ADAH S. MURPHY 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



13 




THEiFLATTERER AND THE NET (Banyan's Pilgrim's Progress)— 
F. A. RHEAD 

THE DECORATION OF POTTERY IN THE CLAY STATE 
PATE-SUR-PATE 

F. A. Rhead 

THE process known as pate-sur-pate (or paste on paste) 
is one of the most delicate if not the most difficult of 
ceramic processes. 

M. Taxile Doat has produced examples of pate-sur-pate 
in a variety of novel forms, both by itself and in combination 
with other decorative methods. M. Solon, in his article in the 
London "Studio", wonders whether a painter or a sculptor will 
succeed the more quickly in discovering the way of drawing 
out of the process all that it may yield under proper treatment. 
That its decorative range is wider than has yet been demon- 
strated is unquestionable. I have myself made one or two 
essays in its application, which go far to show that the pos- 
sibilities are extensive. The plaque illustrating "The Flatterer 
and the Net," from Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress," is an 
amplification of the ordinary methods, inasmuch as the back- 
ground is polychromatic. The sky is yellow and low toned 
red, the foliage and the rest of the landscape is quiet myrtle, 
olive and bronze tones, while the "flatterer" is wrapped in a 
semi-transparent red cloak. The figures of the captives under 
the net and the punishing angel are in pure white. Although 
this plaque was done purely as an experiment the efl'ect is quite 




legitimate, and not at all bizarre. I have also another plaque 
with a figure of "Giant Despair" cased in armour. The land- 
scape backgi^ound in this is also done in colours, but the tints 
are subdued so that at a little distance the general effect is 
almost monochromatic. The face and hands are modelled in 
white, and the giant has wisps of lank hair falling from under 
his helmet in black. He has green pupils in his eyes, and these 
touches of color in combination with the whiteness of his face, 
give him an unearthly appearance, in keeping with his title 
and character. 

His armour was etched with hydro-fluoric acid in elaborate 
patterns and gilt and scoured. 

I have mentioned these examples to show that the use of 
this method of decoration need not be confined to the ordinary 
cameo-like effects, but may be extended to fit the ingenuity 
of an enterprising craftsman. 

The idea of pate-sur-pate, was not founded, as might be 
supposed, on the Wedgwood Jasper wares. The resemblance 
is only superficial. Both have cameo-like figures in white on 
dark grounds, but there the similarity ends. The jasper figures 
are opaque, or nearly so, while the figures in pate-sur-pate are 
translucent, and the thinner parts of the modelling suggests 
shadow by showing the ground through in a greater or lesser 
degree, as desired. 

About the middle of the last century the Curator of the 
Museum of Sevres admired so much the efi'ect of a Chinese 
vase in the Museum that he induced one of the modellers 
at the Imperial factory, Mr Fishback, to make trials with a 
view of obtaining similar effects in the Sevres porcelain. The 
result exceeded the anticipations of the experimentalists, and 
pate-sur-pate became a standard process at Sevres. M. Solon 
was asked by M. Regnault, the Director of the Imperial factory, 
to assist in the development of the new venture. He did so, 
and during his spare time accepted commissions from M. 
Rousseau, and a large series of plaques were exhibited at the 
"Union Centrale des Arts appliques a ITndustrie," in 1865. 
M. Regnault pointed out in his official reports the difference 
existing between M. Solon's technical method and that em- 
ployed at Sevres, and as a further acknowledgment, requested 
him to decorate a large vase to go with the exhibit of the 
Imperial factory to the International Exhibition of 1867. 
The outbreak of the Franco-Prussian war led to M. Solon's 
engagement by the great English Minton firm, and his adapta- 
tion of pate-sur-pate to the English bodies was a new and 
interesting departure, which we will deal with later 

This decoration may be applied to any semi-vitrifiable 
body, but the materials of the vase or plaque and the decora- 
tion applied must be of the same nature. 

There are no secrets connected with the application of 
this process. There are, it is true, certain arbitrary rules, 
which must be observed, in spite of the fact that they contra- 




PLAQUE— LAURENCE A. BIRKS 



PLAQUE, WASHING DAY— L. M. SOLON 



14 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




diet generally accepted theories. It is generally understood 
that all clay decoration must be executed while the piece is 
damp, and that it must be kept in exactly the same state of 
dampness until the decoration is completed. With pate-sur- 
pate the exact reverse is the case. The vase or other object 
intended to be decorated must be absolutely dry, in fact, it is 
actually advisable to pass it through an easy fire — say an 
enamel kiln — before beginning to work upon it. This will make 
the piece about as hard as chalk and will make handling of 
the object less irksome, by minimizing the risk of breakage. 
Even now it is fragile, and if it happens to be a vase with a 
delicate or unsubstantial foot it is better to embed it in sand, 
or prop it in a jar or cylinder, packed with cotton, leaving 
exposed the portion to be decorated. If the foot is to be 
decorated, the vase can be taken out of the cylinder and turned 
upside down. 

We will now suppose that the vase or plaque is made of 
solid dark colored clay, or has a sufficiently thick and even 
coating of the color required, and is slightly hardened by a 
fire in the kiln as described. A careful drawing to exact scale 
should be made of the design to be applied, and an equally 
careful tracing prepared. By placing this tracing on the vase 
in the required place, and passing over it lightly but firmly 
with a hard, fine pointed pencil, it will be found that the design 
will be slightly indented in the surface of the piece, and will be 
a sufficient guide for the application of the slip. 

The white clay should be mixed with water, in a saucer, 
to the consistency of thin cream, and applied with a sable 
brush. It will be found puzzling at first, because the absorption 
is so rapid, but a very little practise, and the exercise of a little 
judgment in the mixing of the slip to the exact consistency, 
will soon overcome any apparent difficulty. The outline must 
be very firm and exact. The first tracing need have no detail 
of any kind — it should have, in fact, only the outside or con- 
taining outline. When this white flat silhouette is filled, ',in 
on the vase, it must dry, and a second coat be applied. 




But the drying of one coat before another is applied is 
one of the rules which must be observed, or there will be crack- 
ing or blistering. It will be found absolutely impossible to 
get a perfectly level coat with the brush alone. When the 
second coat is applied it should be levelled by light scraping. 
The result should be exactly similar to a silhouette cut out of 
two ply cardboard and pasted on the dark ground. The clay 
should be about the same thickness as the cardboard and the 
edges should be just as square and firm. If they are not per- 
fectly firm, they should be strengthened and levelled by a fine 
brush well charged with "slip," and finished with a steel tool. 
This is the first plane, and it is the most important part of the 
work. Any re-iteration or repetition of instructions in these 
papers must be excused, because it is essential that certain direc- 
tions should be well understood. 

To sum up, Figure 1 is the first plane, consisting of a thin 
film of slip on a dark ground. 

1. It should be level with firm edges. 

2. It should be about the thickness of thin cardboard. 
In levelling this plane with the steel scraper, it will be found 
at commencement that the pencilled surface will be full of 
little undulations, owing to the rapid absorption of the slip 
by the porous body. The tops of these undulations should be 




scraped off' as in sectional Figure 2, down to the line A, leaving 
a number of little hollows. These hollows should again be 
filled with slip, dried, and scraped. If this is not done, there 
will be a danger of scraping the film too thin. 

This plane represents the minimum thickness, or lowest 
thickness of the relief. In other words, the relief must be 
nowhere thinner than the first plane. It must be built up in 
varying gi-adations to form the desired contours and relief, 
but always on this platform. If the design is anywhere thinner, 




RERAMIC STUDIO 



15 




PLAQUE— L. M. SOLON 

it will result in an ugly dark patch, which will break up the 
coherence and firmness of the design. After the first plane is 
completed, the tracing should be fitted to it and the most 
important masses marked on the plane as in Fig. 3. These 
should be then painted on with another coat of slip, and the 
edges graduated and levelled with the modelling tool so as to 
form simple contours. These contours should be done as far 
as possible with the slip brush, and the scraping tool will be 
required at every stage to rectify and level the brush work. 
When the contours in Fig. 3 are rounded and softened into the 
ground plane, the smaller contours and reliefs should again be 
applied with the brush, and again polished with the tool as in 
Fig. 4. The effect now is a flatfish, simple undulating relief, 
without detail. The broader details may now be applied, and 
the surface delicately modelled, and lightly scraped perfectly 
smooth as in Fig. 5. The greatest care must be taken to avoid 
carving the surface, or removing more clay than is necessary 
with the modelling tool. 

All modelling should be done with the brush, and the scrap- 
er is only used to clean the surface and smooth down the little 
unevenness of surface which will be found unavoidable. Fig. 6 
shows the method of finishing. The lines and folds of drapery, 
the hair, the key border on the vase, are all done over the 
modelled work with a very fine brush, and the effect is em- 
phasized by varying the thickness and sharpness of these lines, 
and by flattening, bevelling, and softening their edges, and 
making them die into the gi^ound in places. Dark lines and 





GLADSTONE TESTIMONIAL VASE— F. A. RHEAD 



PLAQUE— LAURENCE A. BIRKS 

other sharp touches may be incised in their proper places with 
a rounded point. If the point is too sharp, the effect will be 
scratchy. It must be well boz'ne in mind that all modelling 
must be done on the first flat plane as in Fig. 1 as a foundation, 
and no incision should penetrate below the surface, which 
must be kept the lowest plane of relief, except in the case of 
diaphanous draperies, smoke and flames, clouds, and water, 
which may be added last, when the solidity of the general mass 
is assured. It may be taken as a general rule that the finest 
effects are obtained by exaggerated softness, smoothness, and 
simplicity of modelled masses (see Fig. 5) and exaggerated 
sharpness of applied detail. The operator should not be 
troubled if the detail looks hard and crude, because the semi- 
transparency given by the partial vitrification in the fire, and 
the coating of glaze afterwards makes the whole effect soft and 
mellow. Another point to be observed is the preservation of a 
firm and uniform outline or edge. This must be obtained in 
the beginning in the first plane, and in the subsequent modelling 
this platform must be preserved. The contours may be softened 
as much as the operator pleases on this platform, and down to 
this edge, but the edge itself must not be disturbed, or a ragged 
outline will result. 

A few words as to the characteristics of pate-sur-pate may 
not be out of place. It is not modelling in bas-relief, as ex- 
emplified by the Wedgwood wares, and similar low reliefs. 
There, the contours are obtained by varying thicknesses, ex- 
pressing according to well known laws the exact degree of pro- 
jection to the spectator — in diminished, but true proportion — 
that the surfaces of the object represented do. In pate-sur- 
pate, while the rule is generally observed, there is a certain 
cheating of the eye by the emphasis given to apparent relief, 
by the darker portions, where the ground shows more or less. 

It is not painting, because actual relief is obtained, although 
the relief is not that of the Wedgwood Jasper ware, and the 
shadows or darker poitions of the design are not shadows in 
the true sense, because a shadow is dependent upon the angle 
on which the light falls, while the darker portions of a design 
in pate-sur-pate are simply the lower portions of the relief, and 
the lighter parts simply the thicker or higher parts. 

In shoil, the masses of the design in pate-sur-pate are more 
simplified and less varied in contour than those of a bas relief, 
while the details are proportionately sharper, and very much 
more accentuated. The illustration gives a good idea of M. 



16 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



Solon's playful and poetic invention, but fails to express his 
exquisitely delicate and sensitive execution. The pretty 
humour of the "Washing Day," for example, is accent- 
uated, if possible, by the severity of the composition. But 
it has, notwithstanding its academic type, a curious dash 
of coquetry, which is essentially French. Mr. Laurence A. 
Birks was a fellow pupil of mine in M. Solon's Studio. It is 
to be regretted that his work in pate-sur-pate is now tentative 
and occasional. 

(To be continued.) 



FUCHSIA VENUSTA (Page 2) 

Lucy M. Shaver 

PAINT flowers with Carnation veiy delicate; the calyx 
is Auburn Brown; for the stems use Brown Green and a 
little Yellow Brown; the leaves are Yellow Green and Copen- 
hagen Blue very thin for the leaves are delicate Grey Green. 

Second Fire — Paint background with Apple Green and a 
little Violet, shade toward flowers with Blood Red. Touch the 
flowers with Blood Red on shadow side. Strengthen the leaves 
with same colors used in first firing. 




PLATE— L. R. LIGHTNER 



TRACE the design and outline with India ink, making the 
necessary corrections. Paint in the bands and the form 
which connects the flowers in the outer border with three parts 
Banding Blue and 1 part Copenhagen Blue. The leaves are 
two parts Sea Green and one part Banding Blue. The outline 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



around the flowers and the dark spots in them is Apple Green and 
a very little Violet No. 2. Give this a very hot fire. Second Fire- 
Oil over the entire surface with Special Tinting oil and pad un- 
til tacky, then dust with Peai'l Grey and a very little Deep 
Blue Green, just enough of the latter to give it a bluish tint. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



17 





1>N 








-<^ 



// ., •; ■''?. •''"£--- 



^'fx.- 



..M 






LARKSPUR— E. N. HARLOW 



FIRST Fire^Outline design carefullj^ in Black, then fire. 
The flowers are painted in with Deep Blue Green, Band- 
ing Blue and Black. The stems are Brown Green and Blood 
Red. The leaves are Shading Green and Apple Green. 

Third Fire — Paint in the background with Copenhagen 



Blue, Violet, Blood Red. Use these colors delicately, then 
strengthen the flowers with Banding Blue and Violet with 
touches of Black. 

Use the same colors as in the second firing. The buds 
have a delicate wash of Yellow toward edges. 



18 



tlERAMIC STUDIO 




To be used as a medallion or motif for continuous border in one color. 
Byzantine in design 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



19 




PLATE— H. E. HODGDON 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 




'THRACE in the design and outline with a fine grey India 
■*- ink Hne. Paint a thin wash of special oil over the grey 
tones and dust with two parts Pearl Grey, one part Grey for 
Flesh and a small portion of Yellow Brown. The darkest tone 
in the design including the two bands is Green gold. Out- 
line around the berries is equal parts of Yellow Red and Carna- 
tion. 



(Full size section) 



20 



HlEramic studio 




PLATE— SQUARE FLOWER FORM 

Carry out all of design except centers of flowers in Hasburg's Green Gold. Apply it in two thin washes. Centers of 
flowers painted rather heavy with equal parts Apple Green and Yellow Green. 




To be used as a border design in one color 



IlEKAMIC STUDIO 



21 




HUCKLEBERRY— E. N. HARLOW 



THIRST Fire— Paint berries with Deep Blue Green, Band- 
ar ing Blue. The markings are Black. Stems are Brown 
Green and Yellow Brown. Leaves are Moss Green, Brown 
Green and Yellow Brown. Paint in a background of Yellow 
Brown, Brown Green, a little Blood Red around berries and 



a little Violet No. 2. Second Fire— Touch up berries with 
Violet and Banding Blue. The leaves have a little Yellow 
Green in this fire shaded with Brown Green and Shading 
Green. Use a little Yellow in background and touches of 
Brown Green. 



22 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



COXINIA— (Page 23) 

Alice W. Donaldson 

PAINT flowers with Yellow Red and Blood Red. Stamens 
are Yellow Brown. Stems of flowers are Blood Red 
and Violet. Leaves are Yellow Green and Shading Green. 
Seed pods are Pale Bluish Green. For this use Shading 
Green as a thin wash and strengthen where it seems darker. 
Second Firing — Outline design with Black. 



Third Firing — Paint a flat background of Yellow Brown 
and Grey for Flesh. Touch up leaves with same colors used 
in first firing. 

WATER COLOR TREATMENT 

Flowers from Vermillion to Carmine; cream inside with 
Yellow; Ochre stamens. Stems of flowers from Carmine to 
Mauve. Leaves Hooker's Green, under sides darker than 
upper. Seed pods, pale Bluish Green changing to Yellow and 
Burnt Sienna as they ripen. 




WITCH HAZEL— ANNE H. BRINTON 

Seed pods are Yellow Brown and Brown Green. Stems are Violet No. 2 and Brown Green. The leaves are Yellow and 

Brown Green. 



heramic studio 



23 




COXINIA— ALICE W. DONALDSON 



(Treatment Page 22) 



24 



heramic studio 





DESIGN FOR JELLY JAR AND PLATE 

Mrs. Dante C. Babbitt 
■pvIVIDE jar and cover in three exact parts, plate in five, 
-L' bearing in mind a little care and patience expended in 
accuracy to start with is amply rewarded later. Outline 
entire design in Gold. Be very particular to keep a good 
outline, as this makes the flower. The dark portion is deep, 
dull blue, Lacroix Dark Blue, touch of Ruby Purple and Black. 
Float this color in, do not attempt to tint. Leaves keep to 
the grey greens in preference to a warm tone. All bands 
and center of flower a soft dull brown; Brown 4 or 17 is good. 
Outer petals of asters dull soft pink made of Violet of Iron 
and touch of Deep Red Brown. Fire hard. Tint a rich 
cream using a good Old Ivory, clean out design carefully, 
go over blue, strengthen any lines not perfect, also flowers 
and leaves. For the inner row of petals of flowers use a soft 
cream enamel very flatly. Dry well before firing. 




ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENCE 

<J- B.— You can paint over lustre with the ordinary china paints. The 
lustre can be taken off with the eraser for china; it comes off veiy easily. 

Mrs. R.— Any china can be used for the mat paints. The technique 
in water colors and china painting are very similar. The brush should be 
dipped into the painting medium and then pressed against a rag to take out 
all extra oil; some people then dip it in turpentine in the same manner. When 
filling the brush with the color it should be tested on the palette before apply- 
ing to the china to see that the color is evenly distributed in the brush; the 
color should be clear and transparent as in water colors and not heavy as in 
oils. For fuller detail see the March, 1911, issue of the Keramic Studio, which 
contains a lesson by Miss Ehlers. 

K. K. A.— It would be better to fire the punch bowl in a larger kiln, 
although it might fire successfully in the smaller one if heated very slowly. 
The bowl can be tilted sidewise by placing a piece of fire clay under the base 
to hold it in place. The square pieces of clay that are used as supports for 
the shelf in some of the kilns answer nicely for this purpose. The bowl 
should be raised from the floor if placed upright in the kiln. The kiln can 
be used a long time after it begins to crack. When cracked too badly you can 
get a new firing pot. Burnish silver should be applied in two thin afijjhca- 
tions. Mix the powder with tar oil. 

N. F. G. — The following is a formula for mixing gold: 
Take a piece of bullion or a gold coin and place it in a glass 
I'eceptacle, a graduate is best, and pour over it about an ounce and a half of 
aqua regia and let it stand about twenty-four hours. If it does not entirely 
dissolve in that time pour off the solution of gold that has formed into another 
vessel and add a little fresh aqua regia to the undissolved metal. When it is 
all dissolved pour off the solution of gold into the receptacle containing the 
gold which was previously poured off, being careful not to get in any of the 
white powder or chloride of silver, which has gathered in the bottom of the 
glass. Divide the gold into about three or four parts putting each part into 
a separate glass vessel and fill it about half full of water; the vessel should 
hold about a pint. Dissolve proto-sulphate of iron (copperas) in waiTti water 
and add to the gold until a precipitate is formed which should take place at 
once. The liquid will become cloudy and the gold will begin to drop to the 
bottom of the glass. Let it stand imtil it is entirely settled; it should take 
about seven or eight hours; then pour off the clear liquid. Add some of the 
copperas to the liquid to be sure that all the gold has been removed. Pour 
dear water over the gold again and let it stand until it settles, then pour 
off the water and add fresh water again, repeating this several times in order 
to wash the precipitate. Pour .some chloro-hydric acid over to remove any 
possible oxide of iron and then wash it in boiling water. Allow it to settle 
again and then pour off the water and put the moist precipitate in a shallow 
dish that will stand heating and place it before a moderate fire to dry. To 
]5repare the gold for use, grind it until it is very fine. It will probably not 
require much grinding; this can be done by pas.sing it through a thin piece of 
silk. For flux use twelve parts of nitrate of bismuth to one part of pulverized 
borax, using one part of flux to 12 parts of gold for hard fires, and for soft 
wares add borate of lead. Mix the gold with enough fat oil and turpentine 
to make the proper consistency to apply with the brush. It is best to keep 
the gold in powder form and mix it as it is used. 

A. K. — Your trouble was in not having enough flux in the enamel. Use 
one-fifth flux and give it a medium fire. If a good deal of color is used in the 
enamel do not add as much flux but make allowance for the flux in the color. 
Roman gold can be used on Satsuma. 

H. M. D. — For raised jewels u.se Mueller & Hennings Relief White and 
one-fifth flux and you may add any color you wish to make the desired color. 
If the bubbles appear after the firing it is probably caused by too much oil 
or medium. If the Relief White seems very oily, squeeze it out on a piece of 
blotting paper and the oil will become absorbed. Use the cheapest quality 
of "Garden" Lavender oil for thinning the enamel and use as little as possible. 
The most satisfactory raised paste is that which comes in powder form. Try 
mixing it with just enough fat oil to moisten it (not enough to hold the powder 
together), grind it very thoroughly and then add the lavender oil for thinning 
porposes and give it a rather hot fire. Mildew spots often come out on a poor 
grade of china, there is no remedy for it. 

Mrs. W. W. W. — Some people object to the use of Liquid Bright Gold foi' 
the first application because of the texture and color. Two applications of 
Roman gold gives a much softer finish and seems to wear better. 

L. S. G. — You probably did not place your plate exactly in the center of 
the divider; the width of a line's difference will cause a great deal of trouble. 
The directions for dividing in the "Lesson for Beginners" in this month's 
magazine is the most sure way, though a little slower, although i! is very little 
trouble after one is accustomed to it. Directions for using the plate divider 
are ir> the lesson in the March number. 



heramic studio 



25 




CONVENTIONAL CAT-TAILS 

Alice W. Donaldson 

TO be used on water pitcher. Outline design in Black 
and fire. The cat-tails are Yellow Brown. Leaves are 
Brown Green. Fire. Third firing — Oil pitcher with Fry's 
Special Oil and dust with Pearl Grey three parts, Brown 
Green one part. 




CRAB APPLE 

Alice W. Donaldson 

OUTLINE design with Black, then fire. Paint leaves 
with Shading Green and Apple Green. Apples with 
Yellow Brown and Carnation, deepest tones with Blood Red. 
Stems with Auburn Brown and a little Violet. 

Third Firing — Paint background with Apple Green and 
Yellow. A bit of Grey for Flesh added to this. Touch up 
design where it seems weak. 



THE ART INSTITUTE of CHICAGO 

CERAMIC DEPARTMENT 

ABBIE POPE WALKER, INSTRUCTOR 

SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS 
JULY 1, 1912 

Send for Information 

Box K, THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO, Chicago, 111. 



MAY 



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26 



HlEramic studio 




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The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF JUNE, J9J2 



Lily of the Valley 

Lesson for Beginners in Realistic and Conventional Combined 

"' for a Coffee -Pot 

Japanese Quince 

Plate 

Rectangular Box 

Open Bon-Bon Box Design 

Round Box 

All-Over Design 

Exhibit of the Buffalo Society of Mineral Painters 

Jardinere> Egyptian Design 

Monograms 

Helpful Hints 

Iron Weed 

Pitcher, Daisy Design 

Bowl Border 

After Dinner Cup and Saucer 

Dogwood Blossom Conventionalized 

Golden Rod 

Sugar and Creamer, Buttercups 

Barberries 

Bowl with Red Berries 

Plate, Cup and Saucer 

Pink Carnations 

The Decoration of Pottery in the Clay State, Pate-sur-Pate 

Jam Jar 

Howcr Bowl 

After Dinner Cup and Saucer 

Plate, Nasturtiums 

Honeysuckle 

Cherokee Roses (Supplement) 



H. Foulkrod 

Jessie M. Bard 
Jeanne M. Stewart 
lone "Wheeler 
Georgia B. Spainhower 
Frances E. Newman 
Winnifred S. Gettemy 
M. W. Caudle 

Paul Piering 
Alice E. Woodman 

Mary Overbeck 

Hannah B, Overbeck 

Abbott McCIure 

Alice Seymour 

Arka B. Fowler 

Win Rannells 

Henrietta B. Paist 

Kate Clark Green 

Pearl Monro 

Qara L. Connor 

Photographed by Walter Stillman 

F. A. Rhcad 

Adah S. Murphy 

Alice B. Sharrard 

Haflie Day 

Mrs. W. L. Rice 

Edith Alma Ross 

Kathryn E. Cherry 



Page 
26 

26,28 
27 
29 

30 
30 
30 
30 
31 33 
33 
34 
34 
34 
35 
35 
36 
') 
37 
33 
8 
39 
40 
41 
42 
42 
43 
43 
44 
45 
46 



i6 



^ 



THE OLD RELIABLE milH FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




No. 2 Siz^ U r J2 in. $30.00 ) 

No. 3 Size U X 19 in 40.00 j Gas Kiln 2 sizes 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



/ No. \ Size 10 X J2 in. $15.00 

Charcoal Kiln 4 »iz«. ^^ I f^e 16 x J2 in. 20.00 

No. 3 Size J6 x 15 in. 25.00 

\ No. 4 Sire ra X 26 in. 50.00 

Sprinqfielo, Ohio 



Vol. XIV. No. 2 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



June i9l2 




UNE, the month of roses, is the 
month of opportunity for the painter 
and designer. Then comes the great 
burst of bloom, while yet the grass 
and trees and distant landscape re- 
tain the freshness of spring, and 
the soul, like a butterfly from its 
cocoon, brealcs the chains of winter's 
dull routine and, tasting once more 
the delightful flavor of freedom, seeks 
new worlds to conquer. To the teacher especially the sum- 
mer vacation brings not only a needed change and rest to the 
spirit, but also leisure to replenish the stores of material 
from which will be drawn the inspiration of another sea- 
son's work. 

In last issue we asked for information about the summer 
schools of china painting with a view to publishing the dates 
of opening and closing of these schools in our June issue. We 
have had the following answers, which probably do not cover 
the whole gi'ound but will be of some benefit to those of our 
readers who intend to spend their summer studying, perhaps 
part of the time in one school, part in another: 

Open all summer — Art Institute, Chicago. Instructor, 

Abbie P. Walker. Classes twice weekly. 
July 6 to Aug-ust 1 16— Chautauqua, N. Y. Instructor, 

Mrs. L. Vance Phillips. 
June 1st to July 31st — Mrs. Dorothea Warren O'Hara, 

132 East 19th Street, New York City. 
June 17th to July 27th— Four Winds Pottery School, 
Syracuse, -N. Y., under the management of Mrs. 
Robineau, editor Keramie Studio. Instructors — 
Dawson Watson, Kathryn E. Cherry, Jessie M. Bard, 
Bei-tha Riblet. 
July 1st to August 16th — Winona School of Arts, Winona, 
Lake, Ind. Instructors — Rhoda E. Selleck, Homer 
Gordon Davison, Edna Shover, Marie H. Stewart. 
July 1st to September 1st — Mrs. W. P. Garrett's Summer 

School (fifth season) Thousand Island Park, N. Y. 
August 5th to September 14th — Dawson Watson Summer 
School of Painting and Handicraft, Brandsville, Howell 
Co., Missouri. (Address: Dawson Watson, St. Louis 
School of Fine Arts, St. Louis.) Instructors — Dawson 
Watson, Kathryn E. Cherry, Jessie M. Bard. 



We regret to hear that Mr. Marshal Fry will not have his 
summer school this year, as he wishes to devote his whole time 
to painting. 



There seems to be among amateur designers a difficulty 
in gi-asping the principles of conventionalization. Lately 
there have come to the editor's table quite a few designs, hav- 
ing certain merits of originality or arrangement, which have 
been quite unavailable for the simple reason that the natural 



form modelled as in nature has been twisted and contorted to 
make a balanced and repeated design. Now, it is possible to 
repeat a natural form so as to give a pleasing efl'ect, but it must 
remain naturalistic in drawing as well as modelling and color. 
If the form is to be conventionalized, especially in a balanced 
design, where the two sides are the same, but reversed, the 
drawing of the form must be simplified, there must be absolutely 
no modelling, and the color may be changed at will. There is 
something very unpleasant in an abnormal naturalistic form; a 
freak flower with two stems, so that there may be a line going 
in opposite direction, is quite as shocking to look upon as a 
two-headed calf. When the natural outline of a flower or other 
object is used in conjunction with lines or geometric forms, the 
color witliin the outlines must be flat, but if it is desired to give 
a sketchy efi:ect of little flowers in connection with lines, they 
should be enclosed as in a frame with lines but the flowers 
themselves must not be outlined. These two points will per- 
haps be of some assistance to our future contributors. 

Another point which we would like to make with our 
designers is that wash designs, made upon Japanese paper or 
other paper with water marks, do not reproduce well; they are 
spotty and streaky in reproduction; and those done upon a 
tinted paper are sure to be too dark in tone. These variations 
of tone and texture make interesting class work, but for repro- 
duction there is but one rule that makes a perfect replica of a 
design and that is, to make your design in black, white and 
gi-eys on a perfectly smooth, white paper. 

Will some of our designers try this summer to work out 
conventionalizations of birds and animals, etc., for special 
sets, such as game, flsh, rarebit; also fruit and nuts. We will 
have a Christmas competition this year and we will offer prizes 
as follows, each design to be fitted to a ceramic shape, 
designs not receiving a prize to be considered for purchase: 

For the best conventionalized animal design $5.00. 

For the best conventionalized fish design $5.00. 

For the best conventionalized bird design $5.00. 

For the best conventionalized fruit design $5.00. 

For the best conventionalized nut design $5.00. 

Those studying design in the summer schools can have 
their teachers arrange problems for them on these subjects 
and get the benefit of expert criticism on their designs before 
submitting them, thus killing two birds with one stone. The 
competition will be open only until October 15th, in order that 
some of the prize designs may be published in the Christmas 
issue. Designs must be submitted in black and white wash on 
smooth paper, drawing the entire ceramic form, each design 
to be accompanied by a section of the design done in color. 

Another competition which will close November 15th, in 
time for the New Year's issue, is as follows, each design to be 
executed in one fire: 

$10.00 each for the best design for a dinner set, for the 
best design for a breakfast set, for the best design for a lunch set. 
(Continued on page 46) 



26 



HERAMIC STUDIO 





LILY OF THE VALLEY-~H. P. FOULKROD 



(Treatment page 28) 



LESSON FOR BEGINNERS IN REALISTIC AND CON- 
VENTIONAL COMBINED FOR A COFFEE-POT 

Jessie M. Bard 

DIVIDE the pot into four equal parts with the narrow strip 
of paper according to previous instructions. Begin 
under the handle or back of the spout. It should be divided 
around the widest part at the top of the pot and also just 
above where the spout joins the pot, and a perpendicular line 
drawn between the two marks. 

Hold the pot directly in front of you to see if the line is 
straight. Make a careful tracing of one-half of the design 
and trace it on the pot, using the gi'ey carbon or graphite paper 
as previously instructed. 

The design is to be repeated on the opposite side of the pot 
also. Go over the lines with a fine grey India ink line, making 
the necessary corrections in the drawing and doing the work 
as neatly as possible. It is best for a beginner to paint the 
realistic roses in the medallion before doing the flat work 
around it. Prepare your palette with the following colors: 
Apple Green, Shading Green, Grey for Flesh, Albert Yellow, 
Yellow Brown, Yellow Red and Violet No. 2. Use a No. 4 
square shader for the flowers and leaves and a No. 4 or 6 pointed 
shader for the smaller work. Sketch in the design with a 
china marking pencil ; it is best not to trace it, for you will get 
a much more loose and sketchy feeling to your work. This 
can be easily done with a little practice. Sharpen the pencil 
to a very fine point and touch it lightly to the china and you 
can make a very fine line. 

Paint the dark touches around the flowers with Shading 
Green quite thin with a little Grey for Flesh added to it, then 
paint the light leaves with Apple Green and a little Albert 
Yellow. The roses are painted with a thin wash of Albert 
Yellow, shaded on the shadow side with Yellow Brown and a 
little Grey for Flesh. The very dark touches suggesting for- 
get-me-nots are painted with Violet No. 2. When this is 
finished paint in all the darkest tones in the flat design around 



the medallion with Antique Green Bronze, which is put up like 
the gold and is applied in the same way. 

The lighter toned leaves and buds are Green Gold, applied 
quite thin. Outline around the gold is of the Bronze. If you 
are very careful, a thin wash of Yellow Brown Lustre diluted 
with Garden Lavender Oil can be put over the gi-ey tones of 
the roses without disturbing the outlines. This should be done 
after the outline is dry or it will spread. The small touches in 
the center of the roses explained by the lightest tone are Yellow 
Red paint applied rather heavy. This pot is made of French 
china and also Belleek ware. If it is the latter it requires a 
very light fire — a little lighter than a rose heat. 

Second Fire — Burnish the gold with a glass brush; do not 
rub over the Bronze any more than is necessary or it will darken 
the Green Gold. Wipe off all the particles of glass from the 
pot with a dry cloth or they will fii-e in and leave a bad place 
on the ware. Touch up the roses with the same colors as in 
the first fire where you feel they need strengthening and 
strengthen the centres with Yellow Brown and Yellow Red. 
The shadows in the backbround are Violet No. 2 and Yellow 
Brown with touches of Grey for Flesh for the darkest places. 
Stems are Violet No. 2 and Yellow Red. The entire back- 
ground of the pot is to be covered with Yellow Lustre. This 
should be thinned with the Garden Lavender Oil and applied 
quite thin with a No. 8 square shader. Work very quickly so 
it does not become streaked, it can be padded if necessary. 

If you have not had enough experience with lustres to do 
this successfully, the backgi'ound could be painted in with 
Pearl Grey and a little Albert Yellow. Go over all the gold 
with another thin wash. Be very careful not to touch the 
lustre as it will leave the marks of the finger. This design can 
be carried out with the gi'een color scheme instead of the yellow 
by using Light Green Lustre for the background of the pot 
and using white roses instead of the yellow. 

The leaves are painted in the same coloring but the roses 
are handled more delicately. The lights are left, only the 



HEKAMIC STUDIO 



27 





5^ 



JAPANESE QUINCE— JEANNE M. STEWART 



(Treatment page 28) 



28 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




JAPANESE QUINCE (Page 27) 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

PALETTE— Lemon Yellow, Yellow Red, Pompadour Red 
No. 23, Pompeian and Ruby Purple. 
A very thin wash of Lemon Yellow may be applied to the 
lighter petals of the blossoms over which a mixture of Yellow 
Red and Pompadour Red in equal parts is washed in second 
fire. In the darker petals this same mixture forms the light 
tone which is shaded with Pompeian and one-third Ruby 
Purple. Brilliancy in color with strong light and shade should 
be the aim in this study. The stems are painted with Grey 
shaded with Chestnut Brown. A background in dull gi-eens or 
greys will bring out the colors of the design to best advantage. 



shadow side is painted, using Grey for Flesh and a 
little Apple Green. The very centers have a little 
Yellow in them. 

Third Fire — Use a little Yellow Red in centers 
of roses and a thin wash of the most delicate Yellow 
over the light side of roses, just enough to take away 
the cold appearance of the china, then shade shadow 
side with a little Violet No. 2 and Yellow Brown. 



J- 



LILY OF THE VALLEY (Page 26) 

H. P. Foulkrod 

THIS design may be applied to jardiniere by us- 
ing a wide band at the top. Outline design in 
Black and fire. 

Second Fire — Paint leaves with Lemon Yellow, 
Brown Green and a little Yellow Green. The 
flowers are painted on shadow side with Yellow 
Brown and a little Brown Green. Paint background 
with Yellow Brown and Grey for Flesh. 

Third Fire — Paint the darkest touches in leaves 
with Shading Green and Brown Green and a very 
thin wash of Lemon on the flowers. 



J' 



J- 



GOLDEN-ROD (Page 37) 

FIRST Fire— Paint golden-rod with Albert Yel- 
low, Yellow Brown and Brown Green, with 
occasional touches of Blood Red; the leaves are 
Moss Green and Brown Green; the stems are Yel- 
low Brown and Yellow Green; the backgi-ound is 
Yellow Brown, Brown Green and a little Yellow 
Green. Second Firing — Strengthen the flowers with 
same colors used in first firing, using Lemon Yellow 
for flowers instead of Albert; the leaves are same as 
first firing, using Brown Green and Shading Green 
in deepest places. 




FULL SIZE SECTION OF COFFEE POT 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



29 




PLATE— lONE WHEELER 



(Treatment page 3&) 



30 



RERAMIC STUDIO 









W 



^s^o^^ 



a-& 



"3-^ 



1^^^ 









L^-& 



'^M^ I 



RECTANGULAR BOX 

Georgia B. Spainhower 

TINT background a light grey green (Copenhagen Blue 
with a touch of Yellow) outlines, center of flowers and 
border in Gold. Daisies cream enamel, dull green leaves, 
using Grey Green and darks in Copenhagen Blue. 




OPEN BON-BON BOX DESIGN 

Frmices Ellen Newman 

LARGE flower Pompadour Red. One part Copenhagen 
Blue, two parts Deep Blue for the forget-me-nots. Apple 
Green for leaves. You can either tint the lower part with 
Dresden Yellow Ochre or leave it white. Bands, dots and 
bow knots in gold. 

*" If 

SHOP NOTE 

Removal May 1, 1912, A. Sartorius & Co., from 45 Murray 
Street to 57 Murray Street. 




ROUND BOX 

Winifred S. Gettemy 

TINT, Banding Blue and Yellow Green. Backgi'ound 
of border, light tint of same. Edge, darker tint of same. 
Motifs, Banding Blue and Black. 




M. W. CAUDLE 



hekamic studio 



31 




MRS. WALTER BERTLING 



EXHIBIT OF THE BUFFALO SOCIETY OF MINERAL 
PAINTERS 

THE 1912 Exhibition of the Buffalo Society of Mineral 
Painters, as anticipated, eclipsed all that have gone 
before, in excellence of design and execution. 

In the two years that have elapsed since the last exhibition, 
the members have plainly studied the best in design, to the ad- 
vantage both of themselves and the public, that sadly needs 
education in what is best in ceramic art. 

The day of dropsical cupids disporting in gravy; of his- 
toric heads, or full blown roses, covered with mayonaise, is, 
thank goodness, a thing of the past. 

To an old stager on the ceramic carpet, dating back to 
1877 (the first year I "decorated china"), the great advance 
shown is most pleasing and gratifying. The wide circulation 
of that "prophet in the wilderness," oiir beloved Keramic 
Studio, has had a decided effect in leading the earnest student 
in the right direction. 

The improvement in manner of showing the different 
exhibits was manifest as soon as one entered the Banquet 
Hall of the Hotel Iroquois. Small tables, all with white lace 
or embroidered covers, held each an individual exhibit; thus 
style and individuality had fair show. 

Visitors from the central and southern part of our State, 
from Pennsylvania, and Canada, spoke of the interest awakened 
by the announcement in the Studio. Pity 'tis that more did 
not avail themselves of the educational advantage accruing 
from such an exhibition. To remain at home because "busy" 
is a penny wise and pound foohsh policy. No one within one 
hundred miles of such a ceramic exhibit can afford to miss it. 

While held at the wrong season of the year for numerous 
sales, yet the total result was gratifying, and so much interest 
was aroused that the Mineral Painters were invited to show a 
selection of their different exhibits in the beautiful home of [the 
Twentieth Century Club (the very last word in woman's 



clubdom), on April 10th, and a reception was given to the 
Painters and their friends that evening. 

The president of the Society, Miss Nellie Jackson, used 
Japanese motifs for several designs, with telling effect. 
An oval tray, depicting "cherry-blossom time," had a mat 
dark blue border overlaid with gold outlines of the blossoms, 
surrounding a merry group of Japanese in their Rickshaws, 
pink blossom laden trees in the background. A small rose 
bowl with same blue mat backgi'ound was entirely covered 
with the blossoms in white enamel cleverly built up in shading. 
A cylinder vase had an ivory ground, with fleur de lis in differ- 
ent colored golds. 

A small but most perfect exhibit was that of Miss Frances 
Williams. A rose bowl showed gorgeous butterflies against 
a peacock lustre background. A cylinder vase had silver 
fleur de lis and leaves, against soft grey ground, salmon pink 
at top. A tall slender vase had a very Japanesque bird of 
paradise and flowers, in lustres shaded with color; a very clever 
mingling of both against a gold ground somewhat subdued by 
washes of lustre; top clear gold. It was hard to realize that a 
medallion, mounted as a pendant, was not a product of the 
jeweler's art, so perfectly done were its raised lines, jewels and 
flown enamels in true Moorish coloring. 

Mrs. G. L. Moore had a stunning tall Belleek comport, in 
peacock lustre ground, with design of grapes and leaves in flat 
gold; a tea set and dresser set in shades of dark blue. 

Mrs. Walter Bertling showed all original designs, a tea 
set of yellow brown and gold ; plates all in soft tints of cream, 
gold, and brown; one very effective in gi'eens and blues. Both 
designs and execution excellent. 

Mrs. Alison Weber had the courage of her convictions and 
showed only naturalistic designs, well drawn, and beautifully 
colored. 

Mrs. G. W. Buckland showed a portable lamp in wi-ought 
iron with shade holding landscape panels of opal glass and a 
transom light, three panels of same glass, also done in land- 



32 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





MISS EVA PELTON 



MRS. G. L MOORE 



scapes. Her management of the natural coloring of the opal 
glass and use of the mineral colors was very clever. 

Mrs. Denny showed a well painted portrait panel of two 
beloved dogs, and a dinner set in gold with initials. 

Mrs. Charles Greiner exhibited several charming dresser 
sets in conventional designs, pinks and blues, all very well 
executed. Lines true and firm, not a "streak of lean and a 
streak of fat" as often is noticed in conventional attempts. 

Miss Grace Milson had a plate in panels of raised paste 
and gold, and a tankard of mat green, having a band at top of 
butterflies against a gold ground, which was much admired. 

Mrs. T. L. Palmer showed a beautiful three-piece tea set, 
in gold grapes outlined in black, against a ground of yellow 
brown and yellow lustre. 



Miss Emma Dakin had a very well designed and colored 
orange set; standard bowl, cups and plates; conventional design 
of oranges and pale green leaves outlined in black, against a 
cream ground ; also a cup and saucer in moorish design in dark 
blues and reds. 

Mrs. Filkins had a few things in lustres i-emarkable for 
their quality. 

Mrs. C. E. Waters of Warren, Pa., had some very dainty 
"five o'clock teas" on standard, done in a band of Hght green 
lustre, with all over design of black, and two or three tiny pink 
roses. 

Mrs. George Draegert, a former Buffalonian, now affiliated 
with the Keramic Society of Greater New York, sent on a large 
exhibit, entirely conventional designs. Two bowls in flown 




MRS. DRAKGERT 
MR.S. DliAEGEXlT 
MRS. DRAEGERT 



Airss FRWCRs WILIJlMS 

.MISS CARRIE WILLIAMS 

MRS. PIXLEi' 



MISS WILLIAMS 
MRS DRAEGERT 



MISS JUDSON 
MISS DAKIN 



MISS DAKIN 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



33 




LAMP-MRS. G. W. BUCKLAND 

enamel were copies of same over one hundred yeai's old. One 
had panels of roses in pink flown enamel ; the other a low colonial 
shape, paneled, had orange trees bearing nondescript blossoms 
of violet, with oranges and leaves in natural coloring. A low 



bowl had a design in silver against soft gi'ey. Original designs 
were shown on a pitcher in two shades of blue, and a tea set in 
olive ground, with design in black. Several plates, and a large 
Belleek jar, intricate panel design and small bouquets of 
flowers in flown enamel, made up an attractive selection, well 
executed. 

Miss Carrie Williams, Dunkirk, N. Y., had a pleasing and 
varied exhibit. One bowl in reds, had a semi-conventional 
grape design. Another, lined with yellow brown and yellow 
lustre, had pomegranates flatly painted against a dull black 
ground. A small bowl with plate was very well done in dark- 
est blue bands, and all over design of blossoms. 

Mrs. 1. Pixley, Medina, N. Y., showed some beautifully 
executed conventional designs on plates, cups and saucers, 
using soft tints and lustres. A broth bowl in two shades reseda, 
attracted favorable comment. 

Mrs. A. J. Hastings, Olean, N Y., had one of the notable 
exhibits, small but exceedingly choice in its perfection of exe- 
cution. A pudding dish and plates showed an immense amount 
of work in a band border of peacocks and fruits natural color- 
ing, and gold dotted ground. This set and several plates told 
of fine feeling for harmonious color. 

Miss Eva Pelton, Warren, Pa., displayed all original con- 
ventional designs well worked out. The general effect was very 
harmonious, and the execution admirable. 

Buffalo has good reason to be proud of her last exhibit, 
which shows enormous strides in advance of the work of 
former years. Many favorable comments have been received 
from outside visitors, who have taken the trouble to write 
Keramic Studio about it. 




JARDINIERE, EGYPTIAN DESIGN— PAUL PIERING Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OIL all dark spaces with Fry's Special Oil and dust with two 
pai'ts Banding Blue, one part Sea Green and two parts 
Pearl Grey. Oil all gi-ey spaces except the three oblong spaces 



between the two straight lines in the bud and dust with two 
parts Pearl Grey and one part Apple Green. Paint oblong 
spaces with Yellow Brown and a little Albert Yellow. 



34 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





® 



Forms of the Stencil J. C, P. 




® dfeS 




Four forms of M. C. B. and two of K, G. H., suitable for stationery. 
K. H. G. showing last initial large. 




HELPFUL HINTS 

A paper stump, such as is used in charcoal work, is very 
helpful in cleaning out after one has dusted a color in. 

To make a straight line around a cup, vase, or anything 
of the kind try resting the hand with china pencil on boxes or 
books the desired height and turn the piece of china around. 

To keep a gold brush free from dust and separate from 
others, put in a little glass bottle and label. 

Raised paste can be used more successfully on a damp day. 

Lela Chandler 



For putting hquid gold evenly on edges I bind a small 
piece of cotton on the end of a tooth-pick, then dip this in the 
liquid and press along the edge. 

Every study given in the Keramic Studio that will be of 
use to me I develop in water colors. The students can then 
tell if they will like it, and it is much quicker and more econom- 
ical than developing it in china. 

A chiffonier has proved my gi'eatest studio convenience; 
the drawers are just right for different kinds of studies, port- 
folios can stand on top, leaning against the wall, and lie on top 
while looking through them. One grows tired sitting so much 
and it is just the right height to stand while designing, using 
the top as a desk. 

All my conventional designs are made in India ink on 
tracing cloth. Being transparent you can see that the design 
is in the right place for the china beneath, — marks on china 
showing through. Then it is easy to slip your tracing paper 
under; rubber bands will hold it tightly in place, and one trac- 
ing on the cloth will stand for almost countless transfers. A 
bone crochet needle filed to a point makes an ideal tracer. 

Gertrude Gilpin. 




Various forms of W. V. D. 

MONOGRAMS— ALICE E. WOODMAN 



IRON WEED 

Mary Overbeck 

DESIGN for tile. Paint a wide, soft outline around de- 
sign with Grey for Flesh. When about dry dust Violet 
No. 2 into this outline. Clean design and fire. Paint lights 
in flowers with Violet No. 2 and Banding Blue, shadow side 
with Violet No. 2 and Blood Red. Leaves with Brown Green 
and Violet No. 2. The background is washed in with Apple 
Green and Violet No. 2. 

Next firing — Oil tile with Fry's Special Oil and dust with 
Pearl Grey three parts and one part of Apple Green. 



nUKAMIC STUDIO 



35 



#^ * ;'@^''^ 




PITCHER, DAISY DESIGN— HANNAH B. OVERBECK 



PAINT dark central parts of flower and central part of con- 
necting design Black. Other parts of flower a brick red 
using Yellow Red with a little Yellow Brown and Black. 
Other parts of design Olive Green with a little Finishing Brown 
to make a brownish green. Light tones about design and 



■j::r-^ -- ''^^, 



bands at top and handle, Gold. 

Second fire. — Dust dark background and all parts not 
already painted with a mixture of one-half Finishing Brown 
and one-half Pearl Grey. 

Strengthen all parts of design. 




BOWL BORDER— ABBOTT McCLURE 



OIL over entire surface. Outline design in Grey for Flesh. 
Second Fire — Paint Fry's Special Oil over all parts of 
design without padding and dust with two parts Pearl Grey, one 



part Yellow Brown, one part Grey for Flesh. 

Third Fii'e — Oil over entire surface and dust with Pearl 
Grey and a little Albert Yellow. 



36 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Td>{n^^^i^% 




AFTER DINNER CUP AND SAUCER 

Alice Seymour 

CENTER saucer and base of cup 
Cream Yellow, back-ground of thin 
wash of Royal Green, panels, Apple Green 
five, Green Glaze one, Pearl Grey one, 
flower form White Gold, leaves and stems 
Green Gold, outline Shading Green and 
Black Green equal parts. 

DOGWOOD BLOSSOM 

Arka B. Fowler 

THESE designs, suggested by the dog- 
wood blossom, were intended for 
use on Seiji Ware and were done in Silver, 
but if a color scheme is preferred outline 
in Dresden Black and fire. For second fire 
tint entire plate Grey Green and clean out 
the blossom leaving it white. For third 
fire. — Darken design except blossom with 
Grey Green. 




DOGWOOD BLOSSOM CONVENTIONALIZED— ARKA B. FOWLER 



nElRAMIC STUDIO 



37 




GOLDEN-ROD— WILL RANNELLS 



(Treatment page 28) 



38 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




STUDIO NOTE. 

Harriette R. Strafer has returned from Paris, and can be 
seen at No. 3 Washington Square, N. New York, care of Miss 
Randolph, where she is finishing some portraits before going 
to the sea-shore for her summer's work. She will have classes 
in out-door sketching at Provincetown, Cape Cod, Mass., begin- 
ning with June first. 



SUGAR AND CREAMER, BUTTERCUPS 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 
T EAVE the ground white. Lay the flowers with Orange 
-L' Yellow; the leaves and centers of flowers with the 
Olive Green mixture and outline all with Gold. 



PLATE (Page 29) 

lone Wheeler 

PAINT large part of flower with a thin 
wash of Yellow Brown and a very little 
Brown Green. Bands, stems and buds with 
three parts Pearl Grey, one part Moss Green 
and a little Violet No. 2. Rest of the color- 
ing Banding Blue and a little Violet No. 2. 




BARBERRIES— KATE CLARK GREENE 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OUTLINE design in Grey for Flesh, then fire. 
Second Fire — Paint leaves with Moss Green, Shading 
Green and Brown Green. The stems are Yellow Brown and 
Blood Red. The berries are Yellow Red, Blood Red and Carna- 



tion. Paint in background with Yellow Brown and Brown 
Green. 

Third Fire — Use same colors used in second firing. Do not 
touch up the light leaves. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



39 




BOWL WITH RED BERRIES— PEARL MONRO 



OUTLINE and all dark spaces in Black. Berries Car- 
nation and a little Yellow Red. Leaves Ivory Yellow 
and Yellow Green with a touch of Olive Green. Backgi'ound 
back of berries a very thin wash of Copenhagen Blue and a 
little Violet. Small space between leaves a thin wash of the 



color for berries. Wide outer band and the space leading 
from it between the leaves Blood Red applied heavy. 

Second Fire — Tint over entire surface of plate with a 
thin wash of Albert Yellow and a little Yellow Brown. 



40 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER-CLARA L. CONNOR (Treatment page 44) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



41 




PINK CARNATIONS— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER STILLMAN Treatir.ent by Jessie M. Bard 



FIRST Firing— Use Blood Red very delicately for first 
firing shading with Violet; the leaves are Apple Green 
with a little Violet added for shading; the deeper leaves are 
Shading Green, the buds and calyx are Yellow Green, Moss 
Green and Shading Green; backgi'ound is Copenhagen Blue, 



Violet No. 2 and Apple Green. 

Second Firing — Use same coloring as used in first firing 
for leaves and stems and buds; the flowers are painted over 
with Rose and for deepest coloring use Rose and a little Blood 
Red. 



42 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



THE DECORATION OF POTTERY IN THE CLAY STATE 
PATE-SUR-PATE (Continued) 

F. A. Rhead 
The Material 

AS before stated, any semi-vitrifiable body may be used for 
decoration in this process. The Sevres porcelain gives 
the mellowest and most luscious results in the applied reliefs, 
but when varied color is desired in the grounds and accessory 
ornamentation, the intense fire needed limits the palette, 
because at that heat very few oxides will retain their pristine 
hues. 

Still, although all the colors are very low in tone, with a 
distinct leaning towards greyness, they are pleasant and suave 
in tone. The Sevres Porcelain is fired at Seger cone 14, or 
1410 degrees Centigrade. 

The Copenhagen body ought to yield very interesting 
results. I have seen no example of pate-sur-pate executed in this 
body, but am hoping to have an opportunity of making experi- 
ments. The color palette is likely to be even more limited 
than that of Sevi^es, as the heat is the highest known for por- 
celain, being cone 17, or 1470 degrees Centigrade. 

The Limoges and other French pastes give excellent results, 
and some of the best German Porcelains are similar in com- 
position. These are fired at cone 12, or 1370 degrees Cent. 
The color palette is slightly more varied than that of Sevres, 
but is still narrow in scope. If the body is not accessible in 
its mixed form, a formula giving the ingredients may be accep- 
table, so that the intending experimentalist may prepare his or 
her own pastes. All the materials can be obtained ground, 
and they can be weighed in the dry state, mixed together, and 
thoroughly incorporated by being stirred in water. This body 
must have its own special glaze, so I give the formulae for both. 
Porcelaine Francaise 

Kaolin (China Clay) 500 Kilos 

Felspath Broye (ground Felspar). .400 " 
Silex Broye (ground Quartz) . . 100 " 

Craie Frangaise (ground Steatite) . 60 " 
Glaze to above 

Felspath Broye 120 Kilos \ Frit 

Borax Cristallise (refined Borax). . .200 " /in glost 

Silex Broye 150 " oven 

Kaolin 40 " I and 

Craie Francaise 80 " ,' grind. 

Mix 

Above Frit 250 

White Lead 65 

Felspath Broye 65 

But the most accessible body to the experimentalist, 
(and I venture to think the best for general purposes) is the 
one employed at Minton's by M. Solon. I myself worked in 
this body in M. Solon's studio for a period of about eight years 
and executed two pairs of vases for the Vienna Exhibition of 
1873. I used a similar body at Messrs. Wedgwood's, and also 
made some pieces in the French paste, which were sent to the 
Paris Exhibition of 1878, and purchased for Continental 
Museums. The vase illustrated, which was presented by 
public subscription to Mr. Gladstone, was executed at Messrs. 
Brownfield's, in the English paste. The advantages of this 
paste are, firstly, the possibility of getting gi'eater sharpness 
and precision, with almost equal softness; secondly, the possi- 
bility of firing it at almost any ordinary pottery; and thirdly, 
the richness and variety of color palette, which yields almost 
any tint desired. As an example of the possibilities of this 
clay palette, I may mention that I made for Mr. Godfrey 
Wedgwood a copy of Turner's "Bridge at Basle," using the 



clay colors, exactly as one uses oil colors; and all the delicate 
and warm sunset tones were exactly reproduced, and had, 
withal, a limpid, pearly quality under the glaze which I cannot 
imagine in connection with any other pigments. 

The English body is very simple. The proportion of 
ingredients may be varied slightly to suit the fire, but the 
following may be used as a standard: 

China Clay 10 

Cornwall Stone .... 10 
Ground Felspar. ... 8 
This body made of English china clay will fire at cone 4, 
made of American clay at about cone 6. 

If the Felspar is calcined before it is gi-ound, it will mini- 
mize the danger of warping in the biscuit oven, but this paste 
is fairly sound. A separate paste may be used for the applied 
decoration mixed as follows: 

China Clay 6 

Stone 10 

Felspar 6 

This body made of English china clay will fire at cone 2, 
made of American clay at about cone 4. 

This paste, although developing at a much lower heat than 
the French paste, has the same quality of richness and softness. 
It is too tender to be used for the manufacture of the piece 
itself, but it works safely when applied to the previous mixture. 
Still, for all initial trials and experiments, I should recommend 
the use of the first paste, both for the piece and the decoration 
upon it. 

(To be continued) 




JAM JAR 

Adah S. Murphy 

OUTLINE fruit, flowers and leaves in black, also figures 
in small panels. Outline panels in gold. Color oranges 
rich, deep Yellow, leaves Apple Green and flowers white enamel. 
Put just a touch of red in center of flowers with Yellow around 
the stamens. Tint large panels Light Satsuma, also small 
panels after figures have been fired, tinting right over the 
colors already there. Repeat design three times on jar. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



43 




FLOWER BOWL— ALICE B. SHARRARD 

/^UTLINE and the dark parts in upper and lower bands little Yellow Green. Light tint between the two bands and 

V^ in Hasburg's Green Gold. Second Fire.— Paint nar- in upper band, two parts Apple Green, one part Pearl Green, 

row bands with Apple Green and a little Violet No. 2. Back- Leaves, two parts Apple Green, one part Shading Green and 

ground in large panels a thin wash of Yellow Brown and a a little Violet No. 2. Flowers a thin wash of Lemon Yellow. 





AFTER DINNER CUP AND SAUCER 

Hallie Day 

DO the flower forms in Aztec Blue, and the stems 
and band in Empire Green. The panels 
between stems in Aztec Blue very light, and the 
whole outlined very fine in either black or gold. 



44 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



HONEYSUCKLE (Page 45) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

FLOWERS are painted with Lemon Yellow shaded toward 
edge with Pompadour thin; the stamens are Yellow 
Brown; the leaves are painted with Yellow Green and Shad- 
ing Green; the stems are Blood Red and Brown Green. 

When arranging for plates or vase, group the flowers and 
make some of the shadow bunches with Y^ellow Red and Blood 
Red. 



Make a background with Violet and Blood Red around 
the large mass; shade off with Lemon Yellow, Yellow Green 
and Shading Green. 

PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER (Page 40) 

Clara L. Connor 

OUTER bands Copenhagen Blue two parts. Banding 
Blue one part, Pearl Grey one part. All the rest of 
the design two thin washes of Hasburg's White Gold. 




PLATE, NASTURTIUM— MRS. W. L. RICE 



T 



INT over entire surface with Pearl Grey and a little 

Deep Blue Green. 

Second Fire. — Paint in the design with a flat wash of 



equal parts Copenhagen Blue and Shading Green. Outline 
and bands two parts Copenhagen Blue, one part Shading 
Green. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



45 




HONEYSUCKLE— EDITH ALMA ROSS 



(Treatment page 44) 



46 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



(Contintied from page 25) 

The design for dinner set must be applied to three pieces- 
ten inch plate^ after dinner cup and saucer and eighteen inch 
oval platter. 

The design for breakfast set must be applied to nine inch 
plate, tea cup and saucer, twelve inch platter and creamer. 

The design for lunch set must be applied to eight inch 
plate, chocolate pot, cup and saucer and chop plate. 

A section in color must accompany each design which must 
be executed in black and white wash on smooth paper. Each 
design must be plainly marked on the back with designer's 
name and address. Designs must be sent flat. 

The Atlan Ceramic Art Club of Chicago observed its 
twentieth anniversary recently, reviewing its work in general 
in the past, and its pioneer labors in being the first to blaze the 
way for the general introduction of conventional decoration 
on china, its struggles to obtain recognition, and its successes, 
also the work planned for the immediate future. In all these 
years of work the Art Institute of Chicago has encouraged the 
Club and watched its gradual progress up to last year when 
it invited the Atlan Club to place a permanent exhibition in 
its art galleries. 

So far as we know this is the first time that such an exhibi- 
tion has been requested. The Atlan Club has had its meeting 
place headquarters at the Institute for many years, and because 
of these many favors and the annual exhibitions given each 
fall, the Club presented it with one thousand dollars to go to 
the endowment fund. 

CORRECTION 

In the May advertisement of W. A. Maurer, of Council 
Bluffs, la., the line directly above the firm name, "Full line of 



designs from the Original Design Exchange" has nothing to do 
with the offer of $1.95 for the Outfit Box. The offer in question 
is for the Outfit Box and the Limoges Colors only. 

CHEROKEE ROSES (Supplement) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
Tj^IRST FIRING — When painting white fiowers, put in 
A the dark touches around them first. In this study use 
Shading Green and Moss Green for the darkest leaves; Moss 
Green and Yellow Brown for the light leaves; stems, use Vio- 
let and Brown Green; then paint shadows in roses with Copen- 
hagen Blue and Yellow very thin; the centers are Yellow and 
Yellow Brown with touches of Auburn Brown. The back- 
ground is Copenhagen Blue, Violet for deepest coloring; Vio- 
let and Apple Green for lighter tones and a little Lemon Yel- 
low around the flowers. 

Second Firing — Touch up leaves with colors used in first 
fire. The roses have a little Lemon Yellow in the lighter 
ones, and a very thin wash of Apple Green and Yellow for 
those in shadow; touch up centers again using colors used 
in first firing. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

E. H. — Your trouble is in the ware. They usually fire all right although 
you run a risk, but they do not .stand the weight of one pieee on top of the 
other. 

Mrs. J. J. H. — We have never heard of china painters colie and do not 
believe it is due to your work. 

M. J. J. — We do not know of anything to eover the unglazod si)ots 
besides the flux which you have mentioned. The cau.se of j-our gold burnish- 
ing off is very likely due to being underfired. Use the Garden Lavender Oil 
for mixing gold, the Flower Lavender is too oily. The address of the Keramic 
Supply Co. is Lidianapolis, Ind. We do not know where the gauge fan be 
found. 





CHEROKEE ROSE — kathryn e. cherry 



JUNE 1912 

SU PPL.EM ENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT 1912 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



.■1/ , /y. ^ 




The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF JULY, J9J2 



Editorial Notes 

The Decoration of Pottery in the Clay State, Pate- S«r -Pate 

— Concladed 
Miss Mason's Pittsbarg Class 
Iron Weed 
Plate Border 
Large Pitcher 
BItie Bowl (Supplement) 
Bowl, Basket of Fr«it Motif (Supplement) 
Plate 
Plate 

Miss Mason's Pittsburg Class 
Jerusalem Rose 
Plate Border 
Border 
Plate 
Plates 
Borders 
Plate 
Plates 
Nasturtiums 
Plate 
Studies of Dogwood 



Page 

47 

47,48 
48 
49 
50 
5J 
52 
52 
53 
55 
56-60-64 
57 
58 
58 
59 
61,63 

Daisy B. Horton, Anna Mclntyre and Elizabeth Scroggs 62 
Lulu S, Price 65 

Albert J. Rott 66, 68 

V. T. Simkins 67 

Ella Faber 69 

Lucy M, Shover 70 



F. A. Rhead 
Elizabeth Scroggs 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Ray E. Motz 
Ray E. Motz 
Maud M. Mason 
Maud M. Mason 
Albert J. Rott 
Ray E. Motz 

Harriette B. Burt 
Ray E. Motz 
Albert J. Rott 
Lockwood "Williams 
Albert J. Rott 



THE OLD RELIABLE iind^ FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good QualitUs 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




"e 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 Sl*e J4 X J2 in. $30.00 ) / No. I Siie 10 x 12 In. $J5.00 

No. 3 Size sex 19 in 40.00 Ga. Kfln 2 sizes ^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^ ^^^^ ^o. 2 Sl.e 16 x J2 in. 20.00 

, _ No. 3 Size i6 x 15 in. 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 Size I8 x 26 in. 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



y 



Vol. XIV. No. 3 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



Jtily I9I2 




UR readers will be interested to see 
this month work from the Duquesne 
Club, the Pittsburg Class of Miss 
Maud Mason. The designs as a rule 
are bolder than those of the average 
worker, and strength and fine color 
seem to be the distinguishing char- 
acteristics of the work of Miss 
Mason's classes. It will be inter- 
esting as well as instructive to com- 
pare the class work of the various teachers and clubs as shown 
in the different issues of Keramic Studio. They will each show 
individuality. We have already given this year the work of 
the students of Mrs. Kathryn Cherry and the St. Louis Art 
School and of the Kokomo Club; we will follow this showing 
of Miss Mason's class with the work from the Chicago Art 
Institute and that with the exhibit of our old friends, the 
Newark Club. Still later we will give the work of the summer 
school at Four Winds Pottery, the editor's home work shop. 

At the moment of going to press, the school is in full swing 
and is fairly well attended. We look for fine results not 
only in the work but in jolly good times, for the hill-top where 
the pottery is perched is in the midst of a truly "picnic" 
country and we are all that kind of people. 

We would again call attention to the necessity of marking 
designs plainly with name as well as address, and if possible, 
the color treatment. A great deal of trouble would be avoided 
both for the editor and designer. We have again to correct a 
mistake, the plate designs in the May issue, page 8, credited to 
Mrs. Evelyn Beachey, being the work of Miss Hallie Day. 

Readers of Keramic Studio will be interested to know 
that the editor's exhibit of porcelains at the Musee des Arts 
Decoratifs, at the Louvre, has been followed by an exhibit of 
fourteen pieces in the Paris Salon, which remains open until 
July 1st. 

-i- 

Do not forget our fall competitions in the midst of your 
summer outing, and especially keep in mind the problem 
anent executing the lunch and breakfast sets in one fire. Many 
charming effects can be obtained in one fire and the saving in 
work, time and expense is worth considering, expecially for 
the beginner. It is not necessary to confine oneself to one 
color or gold to get an effect in one fire; if the work is carefully 
thought out and executed one can use several colors, even with 
the "envelope" efl'ect. The latter can be done by first tinting 
the piece and drying hard in the oven; then by using a square 
shader, spots and bands of other colors can be lightly applied 
over the tint, and even gold, if the tint is light. But the 
daintiest efl'ects can be gotten on a white china backgi'ound, in 
which case the choice of color is unlimited except by taste. 
•I" 

Miss Emily F. Peacock, formerly crafts editor of Palette 
and Bench and the well-known maker of fine jewelry, is again 
in New York after havmg remained in Europe one year, most 
of the time in Italy. 



THE DECORATION OF POTTERY IN THE CLAY STATE 
PATE-SUR-PATE (Concluded) 

F. A. Rhead 
The Material — (Concluded) 
ni^HE stains for the ground color, and for accessory orna- 
A mentation, are of course obtained from metallic oxides. 
The following mixtures give the tones most in use. They should 
be weighed dry, the oxides thoroughly ground in water after 
weighing, the paste added after, and thoroughly incorporated 
by further grinding. 

Mazarine Blue 

Black Oxide of Cobalt 1 part 

White Paste (as described) 16 parts 

This can be graduated through an infinite variety of tones 
of blue, down to a pale lilac, by the admixture of more paste. 
Bright Blue 

Calcined Alum 2 parts 

Oxide of Zinc 1 part 

Carbonate of Cobalt 1 part 

White Paste 75 parts 

This bright blue will be more successful if the ingredients 
are calcined and ground before they are added to the white 
paste. 

Chrome Green 

Oxide of Chrome 1 part 

White Paste 10 parts 

Veronese Green 

Oxide of Chrome 2 parts 

Oxide of Cobalt 1 part 

White Paste 45 parts 

This green gives beautiful variants by doubling and trebling 
the quantity of white paste. 

A turquoise like color is obtained by mixing four parts of 
the bright blue stain to one part of Oxide of Chrome, and using 
ten per cent, of this mixed stain. The dark yellows are ob- 
tained from iron, and the light yellows from Acetate of Titanium, 
five to ten per cent, of the oxides being needed according to 
the tints I'equired. Light browns are got by a large percentage 
of the iron oxides, and dark browns from Chromate of Iron well 
ground. If a black is wanted, about six parts of Chromate of 
Iron to one of Oxide of Cobalt will supply the stain, which will 
have to be added to the paste in the proportion of one to eight. 
Uranium, if fired in a closed oven without a free current of air, 
gives a pleasant mauve, but it is treacherous, as it is not pos- 
sible to admit or exclude air at will under ordinary conditions. 
If the air is freely admitted the uranium gives a bright yellow. 
The best way to utilize this wayward, but fascinating oxide is, 
to calcine it first with a small admixture of paste and fix either 
tint for future use. If a yellow is desired, three parts of uran- 
ium may be mixed with two parts of white paste, and put on an 
uncovered biscuit plate at the top of a biscuit oven. It should 
then be ground, and used for stain, and it will be found to retain 
its tint. For lilac the same mixture should be placed in a 
closed sagger, which should be luted with strips of clay until 
air tight. When ground, this stain will also preserve its tint. 
French stone is a material naturally colored by iron to a 
bright red tint. This, mixed with the paste, in proportion 



48 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



varying from one to ten per cent., yields a wide range of tints, 
from bright brick red to a pale pinky salmon. These pig- 
ments may be mixed together and a gi'eat variety of tints 
obtained. 

Only pink is needed for a complete color scheme. But 
while the other colors have a certain suavity which makes 
it difficult to combine them discordantly, the pink is not easy 
to introduce in any harmonious scheme. The base is a mixture 
of bichromate of potash, alumina, and tin, calcined at a high 
heat. The process is risky and troublesome, and as practically 
the same result can be had from ordinary crimson glaze stains, or 
strong underglaze pink, which may be bought from any ceramic 
color dealer, it is useless to take the trouble to make it. The 
stone and spar in the body have a property of destroying the 
pink tone, but this can be obviated by the introduction of a 
little carbonate of baryte. A good general formula is 

Pink Stain 3 parts 

Carbonate of Baryte 1 part 

Ground together. 
1 part of above to 8 White Paste. 
Although other oxides are used, this gives sufficient range for 
any ordinary purposes, and it is only necessary to indicate for 
the guidance of those who are not in the vicinity of a pottery 
how they can prepare their pieces themselves. It is best per- 
haps, at the outset, to begin with a plaque or slab. This can 
easily be done, if the operator is careful. A flat pancake like 
disc of modelling clay is beaten out flat on a bench, and the 
surface trued and polished. It is then cut with a knife to the 
required size and shape. If rectangular, the knife may be 
passed along a straight edge or template. The sharp edges 
should be lightly softened with a sponge or horn. Then a 
wall or dyke of clay should be built round the clay slab, 
about two and one-half or three inches high, and about 
the same distance from the edges of the slab. A sufficient 
quantity of plaster-of-paris should be mixed with water and 
poured over the clay slab, filling the "dyke" to the edges. 



When it has "set," the clay wall may be removed, and the 
clay slab taken away from the plaster, leaving a mould. This 
should dry a couple of days in a warm place (not too warm), 
and the mould is then ready to make the pate-sur-pate slab, 
which may be made either of solid colored paste, or of white 
paste with a colored coat or film. The latter is the more 
economical, and quite as satisfactory in its results. Say a 
dark blue ground is wanted. The blue slip is applied to the 
inside of the mould with a large brush, to the thickness of about 
one-eighth inch. So long as the coat is nowhere thinner, a 
little unevenness in the coat does not matter, as the surface, 
which is where it touches the mould, must be level. Then the 
mould is filled with white slip level with the surface. As 
absorption proceeds, the slip will sink, and more slip must be 
poured in until the sinking has ceased and the paste is flush 
with the top of the mould. In about half an hour it will have 
hardened to the consistency of ordinary clay, and it may then 
be scraped perfectly level with a straight edge or a modeller's 
scraper. It should then be left over night and the next morning 
it will be found to have contracted away from the sides of the 
mould all round. A board or plaster "bat" should then be 
placed upon it, the board and the mould turned upside down, 
and the slab will be finished. It should be dried perfectly and 
passed through an easy kiln, when it can be handled without 
risk, and is ready to work upon. 

If the slab is made of solid stained paste, the process is, 
of course, the same, excepting that the painting of the mould 
is not necessary, although, in any case, it is advisable, as it 
prevents blistering. 

If a vase is needed, the same process is gone through, ex- 
cept that when the mould is filled, it is only kept full of slip 
until the absorption has caused a sufficient thickness of slip 
to adhere to the sides of the mould. Then the slip should be 
poured out. Care too should be taken in the case of a coated 
vase to paint over the seams very thickly after the two sides 
of the mould are joined together. 




MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS— ELIZABETH SCROGGS 



(Treatment page 66) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



49 




IRON WEED— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



(Treatment page 55) 



50 



REKAMIC STUDIO 




SOME OF THE WORK IN DESIGN DONE BY THE 
DUQUESNE CLUB WITH MISS MASON 

A LTHOUGH the time we had to give to this work was very 
-^^ hmited, consisting of six lessons only, I feel that the 
results of so short a period of study were unusually satisfactory. 
All of the examples illustrated show a nice appreciation of 
spacing, relation of masses, etc., in light and dark arrange- 
ments which are capable of development in various ways. 

The five plate designs shown by Mr. Rott, are beautifully 
worked out and exhibit much good feeling for pattern and 
fine distribution of values. 




FULL SIZE CENTER OF PLATE (Page 69)— ELLA FABER 



We think of the Duquesne Club as being one of the most 
progi-essive clubs in the country. They are constantly work- 
ing and striving toward a fine ideal and spare no effort in this 
endeavor. They have made a stand for original work in their 
exhibitions, have a jury of selection and therefore hold to a 
standard of excellence in the work shown. They are particu- 
larly fortunate in having for their president Miss Boyd, whose 
enthusiasm and training in art eminently fits her to direct a 
movement of this kind, and she has done much towards bring- 
ing about this happy result. 

Maud M. Mason 



PLATE BORDER— RAY E. MOTZ 

T?OR the darks use blue enamel made of Banding 
-■- Blue, three parts, one part Blue Green and 
one part Azure Glaze. This is to be floated on as 
enamel, even in the case of the lines around the 
panel and fiower. 

For the flower use Turquoise Blue and Turquoise 
Glaze and ground-lay the panels with Grey Green. 
Retouch the flower with Turquoise Blue and Dark 
Blue with Banding Blue and Blue Green. 

LARGE PITCHER— RAY E. MOTZ 

FOR the leaves, stems, etc., use Brown Green, 
and for the grapes and the lines that panel 
the body of the pitcher use Violet to which one- 
eighth Banding Blue has been added. 

For the second fire tone the entire piece with 
Brown Green to which a little Albert Yellow has 
been added and dust with Pearl Grey. 

For the third fire use the same colors in retouching 
that were used in the first painting. 

A fourth firing with a tone for Brown Green 
dusted with Pearl Grey gives a much richer effect. 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



heramic studio 



5t 




LARGE PITCHER— RAY E. MOTZ 
MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



52 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




BLUE BOWL (S«pplemcnt) 

Maud M. Mason 

THE design illustrated was planned for a rather heavy 
baking dish bought in the basement of a department 
store, but there are many charming Belleek and French bowls 
which may be used equally well for this arrangement. Much 
interesting ware can be found in out-of-the-way shops some- 
times of a heavy variety that lends itself very well indeed to a 
certain simple bold kind of design and treatment. 

If used in a higher or more tapering bowl, the space on the 
lower part may be paneled or toned with vertical lines or left 
plain as desired. The panels may also be straightened and 
the space between kept uniform. After transferring the unit 
for which an outline is reproduced, and of which a tracing may 
be made, the entire design is washed in with Blue Enamel for 
which any shade of blue desired may be used. 

A good medium blue is made of four parts Banding Blue, 
one part Blue Green, one part Azure Glaze; mix rather stiff 
with Painting Medium, thin with Enamel Medium and float 
with turpentine using a No. 7 pointed shader. When dry the 
heavy black lines are painted, leavingthe black accents on leaves 
for the second firing. The narrow border is intended for the 
inside of the bowl placing it one-fourth of an inch below the 
rim and is treated in the same manner as the outside of the bowl. 

The tones may be flattened or strengthened by washing 
over in the second firing with the same colors used in the 
enamels, with the exception of the glaze which is in each case 
omitted. If a very brilliant blue enamel is desired use less 
Blue Green; or if a darker color is wished add a little Royal 
Blue to enamel or use Royal Blue and Azure Glaze alone. 

An infinite variety of blues are available by different com- 
binations with Azure Glaze. Another effective scheme for 
this design would be Yellow Enamel for flowers and stems — 
two parts Egg Yellow, one part Neutral Yellow and one part 
Best White Enamel. Background and leaves Green Enamel — 
four parts Apple Green, one part Green Glaze and a very small 
touch of Violet to grey it; a little Brown Green will deepen 
the color. Retouch with same colors omitting enamels and 
glazes. 



The sooner it is learned that a hard and tight perfection 
of execution should not be the sole aim of the decorator — is 
entirely lacking in artistic quality and is quite contrary to all 
the canons of art, — the better our work will become and the 
higher our standard will be raised. Those designs that look 
as though they were bits of paper cut out with scissors and 
glued to the porcelain have no feeling or meaning, and little 
to redeem them. We often hear it said of a decoration that it 
looks just as perfect as though it was printed! And it might 
better have been printed if it looks like that! Consider the 
infinite amount of labor that would have been saved by so 
doing. 

The ideal way of executing any design is to make each 
stroke expressive— try to feel what you are doing and do not 
outline like a machine while your thoughts are busy with other 
things. 

The best Chinese and Japanese porcelains are more re- 
fined in form and texture than anything we have to decorate 
and yet they outline and paint in a very loose, free and spirited 
way. Each unit is by no means an exact reproduction of an- 
other, yet it is in perfect harmony and unity. We need to 
study fine old things more, and especially the manner in which 
they are done. Accuracy of technique is all very well for the 
beginner, but this must develop into something finer. By a 
free technique is not meant careless execution, but deftness of 
expression which is the accompaniment of both a trained mind 
and hand. 

BOWL, BASKET OF FRUIT MOTIF (Supplement) 

Maud M. Mason 
nr^HE design reproduced suggests one of the many ways that 
A this bowl, which lends itself so well to a variety of treat- 
ments, may be decorated. 

The motif in this case may be repeated five times, at 
regular intervals, of course, around the border, leaving inter- 
vening panels. In applying it space the bands carefully and 
divide the bowl into ten equal divisions, drawing these vertical 
construction lines in ink. The unit is reproduced in outline, 
of which make a careful tracing with ink and pen on very 




FULL SIZE CENTER, PLATE— ALBERT J. ROTT 







JULY 1912 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



SALAD BOWLS — M. M. MASON 



COPYRIGHT I91a 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



53 




PLATE— ALBERT I ROTT 




FOR the darkest value use Empire Green to which a touch 
of Violet and a little Pearl Grey have been added. Dust 
with Empire Green. 

In the second fire paint the half tone with French Grey 
to which a little Chinese Green has been added and paint the 
flowers in a pale wash of Carnation. Tone the entire plate 
with Pearl Grey to which a little Apple Green has been added 
and dust with Pearl Grey. Clean out the flowers as the grey 
will absorb the red. 



Foil Size Section 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



54 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




essary. On the inside of bowl a black line placed about one- 
fourth inch from the top edge completes the decoration. 

If you are inexperienced in handling the enamels they 
will probably need some retouching; if so use the same colors 
as used in laying them with the exception of the glazes or 
enamel which must be omitted. Run over the enamels in 
this case with a thin flat wash of the colors needed to even them 
or make them more brilliant. 




FULL SIZE SECTION BORDER OF PLATE— RAY E. MOTZ 



transparent tracing cloth. Place this motif on every alter- 
nate vertical line within the border and make a very clean and 
accurate tracing of it; when the entire border is ready outline 
with fine black lines and then paint in the background, sur- 
rounding the basket of fruit with Black. Next space the lines 
on the lower part of bowl as suggested in design. Paint in the 
gold lines with Mat Gold (which fires best on 
Belleek) and then parallel these with fine black 
lines. Finally the black of the top border is 
painted in, when the bowl is ready for its first 
fire. 

Second Fire — Tint the intervening panels 
with Neutral Yellow and dry while preparing 
the enamels. 

For the blue enamel use to four parts 
Banding Blue one part Blue Green and one 
part Azure Glaze. The Azure Glaze is a very 
soft enamel which gives a good transparent 
quality to the color — mix separately and rather 
stifT with Painting Medium. Afterward mix 
them all together and thin with a little Enamel 
Medium and float o n with turpentine using a 
No. 6 or 7 pointed shader. Remember these 
enamels must be floated and not painted on. 
Handle them very much as you would a water 
color, wash with the brush scarcely touching 
the porcelain but coaxing the color along. In 
this way you can obtain clear and transparent 
color and in no other way can you with enamels. 

The greenish enamel is made with equal 
parts of Apple Green and Turquoise Blue to 
which one-fourth Turquoise Glaze has been 
added. For the yellow enamel use four parts 
Egg Yellow, one part Neutral Yellow and one 
part Best White Enamel. No enamel is added 
to the orange color which is Dark Yellow 
Brown, as it would reduce the brilliancy of 
this color. When this has been accomplished 
paint in the gold pattern in panels and go over 
the gold lines on the lower part of bowl if nec- 



The enamels will appear more brilliant than they can be 
reproduced — the idea being to have the motif sparkle bril- 
liantly in its background. 

These explicit directions are written for those who have had 
little experience in doing work of this kind hoping to interest 
them in trying this simple little design. 

STUDIO NOTE 

Mrs. M. K. Schomacher, a graduate of the School of Fine 
Arts, of St. Louis, has been engaged by the Railsback-Clare- 
more Company of Los Angeles, as designer and instructor in 
conventional china painting, miniature and water color. 




FULL SIZE CENTER OF PLATE— RAY E. MOTZ 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



55 



IRON WEED— KATHRYN E. CHERRY (Page 49) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

SKETCH design in carefully then use Violet No. 2 and 
Deep Blue Green for lightest flowers and to this add 
Royal Purple for the darker flowers. The buds are painted 
with Blood Red and Violet No. 2. The calyx is painted with 



Moss Green and Brown Green. The leaves are Shading 
Green and Moss Green used delicately for light leaves and a 
little Brown Green added to this for the darker leaves. The 
stems are a reddish brown. For this use Blood Red, Yellow 
Brown and Brown Green. Second fire — Strengthen flowers with 
same colors used in first fire, then wash in background with 
Copenhagen Blue very thin, Apple Green and a little Violet. 




PLATE— RAY E. MOTZ 



THIS design used on a large chop plate or plaque would 
make a fine effect done in the manner of the old Persian 
pottery. Tone the plate first with Neutral Yellow or with 
Ivory Lustre, as you wish a more or less brilliant surface. 



In the second fire paint in the whole design with Copper 
Lustre, being careful of the edges. This Copper Lustre will 
have to be repeated for two or three fires to get the depth and 
evenness of Lustre, and to ensure firm edges. 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



56 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. McINTYRE 



ALBERT J. ROTT 




ELLA FABER 



MABEL FOUST BILLHARTZ 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



57 




7^ 



3 






..^ 




JERUSALEM ROSE— HARRIETTE B. BURT 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OUTLINE design with Grey for Flesh, then fire. Second 
fire— Paint flowers with Blood Red very delicately. 
Use Violet No. 2 with Blood Red where the darker tone is 
toward the center. The stamens are Lemon Yellow. The 
leaves are Moss Green, Brown Green and Shading Green. 



Background Lemon Yellow, Violet No. 2 and Grey for Flesh. 
Third fire— Use Rose over the light pink in flowei', use 
a little Violet No. 2 with Rose to grey the shading in flowers. 
The leaves are washed with Apple Green and Shading Green. 
The stems are Shading Green and Brown Green. 



58 



Ili:RAMIC STUDIO 




Fttll Size Center of Plate (Page 68) — Albert J. Rott 



Full Size Center of Plate — Lockwood Williams 




BORDER— ALBERT J. ROTT 

This is a good design to use for a white and gold treatment and would also be very effective with Orange 
Lustre grapes with gold leaves and stems and an Ivory Lustre background. 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



59 




PLATE— LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 




Full Size Section 



'T^HIS is another design that rather suggests a monochrome 
-■- treatment, although it would be equally good in bril- 
liant colors. For the latter Black in the darkest values, a 
good strong Green in the half tones with a gre3dsh yellow such 
as Egg Yellow toned with Neutral Yellow in the lights. For 
the more delicate and monochrome treatment French Grey 
with a touch of Apple Green for the darks and Pearl Grey 
with a touch of the same green for the light, and a tone of 
Pearl Grey with a little Apple Green and dusted with Pearl 
Grey would make an admirable effect. 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



60 



KERAMIC STUDIO 






HARRIET B. GRANDY 




ANNA M. McINTYRE 





ANNA M. McINTYRE 




ELLA FABER 



-U- -U- .U- -JJ- 



HARRIET B. GRANDY 




m^ 







ELLA FABER 




HARRIET B. GRANDY 



CROSS STITCH J| djUH 1 

led 



ALBERT J. ROTT 



ALBERT J. ROTT 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



61 



DOGWOOD 

Lucy M. Shover 

FIRST Fire — Draw design in carefully. Outline the 
white blossoms with Violet. The stems are Blood 
Red and Violet. The leaves are Brown Green and Moss 
Green. Flowers are shaded with Violet and a little Brown 



Green. Use this very delicately. The seeds are Yellow 
Brown and Blood Red. The dark spots on flowers are 
Blood Red. 

Second Fire — Wash in background with Yellow Vio- 
let and Brown Green, strengthen blossoms with same col- 
oring as first fire. 




PLATE— ALBERT J. ROTT 

For the darks use Banding Blue, two parts; Blue Green, one part. In the second fire, ground-lay the entire border with 
Azure Glaze, and then clean out the flowers, leaving them white. The dark blue may be retouched with Banding 

Blue and Blue Green if necessary in another fire. 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



62 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BORDER— DAISY B. HORTON 



(Treatment page 66) 




BORDER— ANNA McINTYRE 



(Treatment page 69) 




BORDER— ELIZABETH SCROGGS 
MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



(Treatment page 69) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



63 




PLATE— ALBERT J. ROTT 

This design is beautiful carried out in gold and Trenton Ivory. Use the Trenton Ivory ground-laid for the half tones, i. e., 

in the panels, and gold in the darks and in the lines. 



OP 



OO 



Foil Size Center 




Foil Size Section 

MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



64 




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DAISY B. HORTON 




MABEL FOUST-BILLHARTZ FULL SIZE CENTER OF PLATE (Page 65j LULU S. PRICE 

MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



65 




PLATE— LULU S. PRICE 




'T^HIS design is specially suitable for a monochrome 
-*- treatment — for instance use Empire Green and one- 
quarter Apple Green for the darks and in a second fire tone 
with Green Glaze dusted on. If a little more color is liked 
the flower form might have the Green Glaze carefully 
cleaned away and the thin wash of Pompadour used in 
these spaces. 



Full Size Section 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



66 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



BORDER— DAISY B. HORTON (Page 62) 

"pAINT all the darks, i. e., leaves, outline of grapes, etc., 
-*- with Brown Green. For the grapes, use Violet and 
one-quarter Banding Blue. Second Fire—Tint the entire piece 
with Albert Yellow to which one-quarter of Brown Green has 
been added and dust with Pearl Grey. The grapes and leaves 
may be retouched in an extra fire if need be with the same 
colors used in the first painting. 



DESIGN— ELIZABETH SCROGGS (Page 48) 

'T^HIS would make a charming decoration for the centre of 
-t a plate using a very simple border or merely lines at the 
edge of the plate. The color must also be kept simple, mono- 
chrome perhaps being best. 

Two blues or two greens, or a brown for the darks with 
Neutral Yellow to which a little Dark Yellow Brown has been 
added for the light. 




PLATE— ALBERT J. ROTT 



THIS plate, to be carried out in two blues, should have for 
the darker blue, Banding Blue with one-quarter Copen- 
hagen Grey added and dusted when dry with Azure Glaze. 



The panels can be goundlaid with Azure Glaze. If necessary 
the darker blue may be retouched in a second firing with 
Banding Blue and Copenhagen Grey. 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



67 




NASTURTIUMS— V. T. SIMKINS 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OUTLINE design with Grey for Flesh then fire. Second 
fire — Use Lemon Yellow and Yellow Brown for the 
lights in flowers. Yellow Brown and a little Brown Green 
for shadow side; the dark coloring toward center of flowers is 
Blood Red. Leaves use Apple Green and Yellow for the 
very lightest places and Moss Green and Brown Green for 
the dai'ker leaves; in the very darkest tones use Brown Green 



and Shading Green. Stems are a very tender yellowish green; 
use Yellow with a little Yellow Green. Paint in background 
with Yellow Brown, Brown Green shaded with Shading Green 
and Grey for Flesh. 

Third fire — Use same coloring as used in second firing 
only put colors in flat washes and wash the leaves with Apple 
Green. 



68 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE— ALBERT J. ROTT 




Full Size Section 
(Full Size Center on Page 58) 



PAINT in the darks with Brown Green to which a touch of 
Yellow Green has been added. This should be used 
for the lines also. 

In the second fire tone the whole border and the centre 
medallion with Warm Grey and dust with the same. Clean 
out the|flower2_forms. Retouch the gi-een with Brown Green 
and Yellow Green equal parts. Tone the centre of the plate 
and flowers with Neutral Yellow dusted with Pearl Grey. 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



69 



BORDER— ELIZABETH SCROGGS (Page 62) 

PAINT the leaves in with Chinese Green and one-quarter 
Empire Green, using the color. quite thin. The grapes 
are Egg Yellow and Neutral Yellow equal parts. The darkest 
spaces are in Empire Green and Dark Green. Dust it all with 
Pearl Grey. Second Fire — Paint the backgi'ound with Empire 
Green and Chinese Green equal parts, and dust with Pearl Grey. 
Third Fire — Tint the entire piece with Chinese Green and one- 
quarter Pearl Grey, and dust with Pearl Grey. 



BORDER— ANNA McINTYRE (Page 62) 

PAINT the leaves in with Shading Green and the grapes 
with Banding Blue to which a touch of Black has been 
added. Paint the half tone with Turquoise Blue. Dust all 
with Persian Blue. Second Fire — Tone the entire piece with a 
tint made of three parts French Grey, one part Dark Yellow 
Brown, to which a very little Black has been added, and dust 
with French Grey. Retouch the colors in the last fire with the 
same as those used in the first painting. 




(Full size center on page 50) 



PLATE— ELLA FABER 



Ground-lay the half tone panels with Grey Green. Paint in the darks with Empire Green and a very little Dark Green. Second 
Fire — Dust the entire plate with Green Glaze, and in a thii'd fire retouch the dark green if necessary with wash of Empire. 



MISS MASON'S PITTSBURG CLASS 



70 



RERAMIC STUDIO 







m 






W:^t 







.^4 




DOGWOOD— LUCY M. SHOVER 



(Treatment page 61 j 



The entire contents of this Magazine are coyered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF AUGUST, 19 J2 







Page 


Editorial Notes 




71 


Color Study of Buttercup (Supplement) 


Marie Bohmann 


72 


First and Second Problems 


Class Work Chicago Art Institute 


72 


Third and Fourth Problems 


Class Work Chicago Art Institute 


73 


Satsuma Boxes, Special Problem 


Class Work Chicago Art Institute 


73 


Buffet Sets, Etc. 


Qass Work Chicago Art Institute 


74 


Plate 


Alice Osland 


75 


Coupe Plate 


Laura L. Stoddard 


76 


Satsuma Boxes 


Kredell, Benedict, Brownson, Claybaugh 


77 


Plate 


Leo J. KuII 


78 


Bowl Design 


Marguerite Meachem 


79 


Plates 


Violet Harvey 


80,81 


Salad Bowl 


Edith Kreden 


81 


Plate 


0. A. Davison 


81 


Plates and Tiles 


Class Work Chicago Art Institute 


82 


Plates 


Class Work Chicago Art Institute 


83 


Dresser Trays and Plates 


Lucille Turner, Martha Wistrand 


84 


Plate 


A. M. Hardman 


&5 


Sedji Bowl 


Edith Kredefl 


86 


Cylinder Vase 


Laura L. Stoddard 


86 


Vase 


Carrie Nelson 


87 


Vase 


Violet Viant 


87 


Dresser Tray 


Lois Boston 


87 


Tea Set 


Lethia Brownson 


88 


Dresser Tray 


Helen G. Morrow 


89 


Dresser Set 


Mildred Brown 


90 


Rim Plate 


Mildred Brown 


91 


Sedji Sugar and Creamer 


Marie Claybaugh 


92 


Answers to Correspondents 




92 



iS 



THE OLD RELIABLE i™d^ FITCH KILNS 



9k 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LmXE TO OPERATE 




•e 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 Size 14 x 12 In........ $30.00 ) ' ^ ^ / No. I Size iO x 12 in. $t5.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 19 in 40.00 G« KUn 2 sizes Kiln 4 .ize.. P°- 2 Size i6 x 12 in. 20.00 

^^^^^ ^^^ ^.^^^TT,T^o No. 3 Size 16 X 15 in, 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 Size J8 x 26 in. 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



sf 



Vol. XIV. No. 4 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



A«gast J9I2 




E have been "talking it over" with our 
friends, and have decided on some 
things and are considering others, 
the "it" in question being how to 
irmprove Keramic Studio and make it 
more generally useful. It is diffi- 
cult to ascei'tain just what our sub- 
scribers want, we ask them from 
time to time but comparatively few 
respond. A little while ago we tried 
to start a column of "Hints for Beginners" but only enough 
hints were sent in for two issues, whether our readers ran out 
of "hints" or whether they forgot to send them we do not know 
but we 'wish they would continue the good work. Now we 
are proposing several things and we msh every real friend to 
Keramic Studio would write us what they think of them. 

In the first place some people have suggested that we 
add four pages of other crafts, leather, jewelry, basketry, 
carving, etc., and that if this feature proved popular we should 
add more pages. This without in any way curtailing the 
ceramics. Once before we had a department of this kind but 
transferred it to Palette and Bench, which carried it on success- 
fully until we sold the magazine and the new publisher killed 
it. It seems to us that more china decorators are now taking 
up the crafts and that this venture might have a better chance 
of success now than then. Let us hear from you about it. 
Another feature is to give, from time to time, issues de- 
voted to fine and artistic photographs of various flowers, etc. 
This is a subject about which we especially would like to hear. 
There seems to be a variety of opinions. Personally, the editor, 
and many of h^r artist friends prefer these fine photogi'aphic 
studies to wash drawings in black and white, but we have heard 
many criticize us for giving them. It comes, we think, from 
an entire misunderstanding of the situation. Perhaps it might 
help to a clearer view of the matter if the editor explained the 
grounds for her preference. 

In the fii'st place let us make clear the financial aspect of 
the question. These fine photographs cost us every bit as 
much as the wash drawings. Some have felt that they did 
not get their "money's worth" in a photograph. As a matter 
of fact, they are taken by artists who give much thought to 
the composition, lines, light and shade, masses, etc. How- 
ever, the special advantage lies in this, whereas the studies in 
wash drawings often have cherries with creases like peaches, or 
currants with raspberry leaves, or grapes with rose leaves, 
with photogi-aphs there is no possibility of mistake and the 
naturalistic painters can absolutely rely on the drawing whether 
they choose to work it out in detail or not. These photo- 
graphic studies are fine for reference w^hen they are copying 
wash drawings, to be sure that no botanical mistake is being 
committed, while the arrangement of these studies is such that 
if desired they can absolutely be used as they are. For the 
designer they are even more useful, as the drawing and detail 
are absolutely correct and they are enabled to work directly 
from these studies in making conventionalizations and designs. 
Other features which we are considering are as follows: 
(Let us have your opinion.) Pictures of studios and arrange- 



ments of working tables, etc., to best advantage. There is a 
chance for great improvement in this respect. Possibly studios 
and faces of prominent workers with a talk on their methods 
of teaching, of conducting classes, touching upon studio 
privileges, rights and coui^tesies toward pupil and teacher, 
etc. This is a suggestion from our good friend Sara Wood 
McCampbell and sounds rather interesting to us. Methods of 
teaching have changed so since the days of naturalistic painting 
on china when the students watched the teacher paint, at from 
two to four dollars an hour or took their fifteen minute turn in 
class for one to two dollars. Now the teacher, the good teacher, 
makes the student do her own work and goes about from one 
to the other criticizing and suggesting in a way that is benefi- 
cial to the entire class. Mrs. McCampbell writes, "many 
conscientious teachers do not know how to meet the change. 
One told me this spring that she spent all of Monday 'fixing' 
work left from Saturday classes; work which she felt would be 
a discredit to her and to the pupil and which was done under 
the old methods of handling a class." We are going to ask some 
of the leading teachers to write for us on this subject and in 
the meantime would be glad to consider any articles submitted 
by our subscribers and if we find them helpful will gladly pur- 
chase them. Any suggestions as to how Keramic Studio can be 
improved and made more useful will be gratefully received. 

The editor has been gathering material from the various 
summer schools, and will soon begin a series of articles on 
the way the work has been conducted, with illustrations of 
finished work by pupils and teachers. Naturally she will 
begin with the Four Winds Pottery School for she has that ma- 
terial right at hand and it is right good stuff too. That sum- 
mer plan has been very successful not only as a school but 
especially as a scheme for giving the editor a jolly good time 
without leaving home. It is wonderful how much earnest 
work conduces to intense enjoyment. 

ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO 

We give in this number illustrations of the work done at 
the Chica:go Art Institute under the instruction of Miss Abbie 
Pope Walker. This will prove to be an interesting addition 
to the many illustrations of class work we have already given, 
as the schools of the Chicago Ai't Institute are among the most 
important in the country. 

The class in design, as applied Jo, Ceramic Art, meets 
daily, 1 to 4 p. m. A special room for this study is provided. 
The instraction in Design includes the study of organic orna- 
ment, geometric and conventionalized, the effect of repeti- 
tion and contrast, the artistic use of colors, etc. 

The instruction in Ceramic Painting covers processes and 
materials, including the practical application of design to 
ceramics, the use of appliances, the properties of paints, lustres 
and oils, the methods of firing, etc. The subjects are taught 
by practical demonstration, talks and individual instruction, 
as may be demanded. 

All students entering the painting class must have a knowl- 
edge of design, or take special designing course with other work. 



72 



HEKAMIC STUDIO 



COLORED STUDY OF BUTTERCUP (Supplement) 

Marie Bohmann 

THE border is suitable for a vase or bowl and is very effec- 
tive in the brown and yellow coloring, with a Satsuma tint 
for the body of the piece. Outline in Brown Green. Flowers, 
Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown; leaves, Empire Green; 
small brown panels, Yellow Brown. Envelope this in a tint 
made of Yellow Brown and Brown Green, wiping out the 
flowers and the touches of white, also the blueish veining of 



the leaves. The medallion may be treated in the same way or 
in lustre with metals. Outline with Black. If syrup is used 
the lustre may be applied at once and all' done in one fire. 
Either Light Green or Yellow Brown lustre may be used or 
any color which wih harmonize with a costume. 

Dry in an oven at once and thoroughly, then the metals 
may be painted on. Gold for the flowers, Antique Green 
Bronze for the leaves and the white dots Burnish Silver. Re- 
touch if necessary. 




Glen Tomlinsom 

Miss Larson 



Helen Morrow 

Marie Claybu 



Lucile 
rgh 



FIRST PROBLEM 




Helen Lienank Charlotte Green Lethia L. Brownson Haidee Lee 

Rhea Moonert Lottie Gwlick Glen Tomlinson Edna Weart 




Helen Morrow Mary Field Marie Claybaugh 

Amy Gillespie Olive Maley Helen Lienank 

SECOND PROBLEM 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 






ANALYSIS DRAWINGS AND DESIGNS FROM THE B UTTE RC U P— M A R i e bohma 

AUGUST 1912 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT )S12 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYHACU SE , N. Y. 



heramic studio 



73 




Marjorie Noack Helen Morrow Laura Stoddard 

Laura. Stoddard Marie Claybaugh 




Adelle Howser Violet Viant Lois Boston 

Lucille Turner Charlotte Green 

THIRD PROBLEM 




Salt and Pepper — Lethia Brownson 

Marie Claybaugh 



Hardee Lee 

FOURTH PROBLEM 



Carrie Nelson Mary Field 




Carrie Nelson Carrie Nelson Mary Field Lethia Brownson Mildred Brown 

Edith Kredell Tolie Benedict 

SATSUMA BOXES— SPECIAL PROBLEM 



74 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




Charlotte Green Rhea Moonert 
Plate — May Hardman 



BUFFET SET 

Marguerite Johnson Rood 
The colors used are Auburn Brown and Brown Green, 
with Gold and Yellow Brown Lustre. 




Lethta L. Brownson 



Edith Kredell 



Carrie Nelson Laara Stoddard Mildred Brown 
Marguerite Johnson Rood 




Lethia L. Brownson Mary Jenkins 

Carrie Nelson 



Marie Clayfaaagh 
Mary Field 



Lottie Gulick Carrie Nelson 
Edith KredeU 



Louisa Smith 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



7S 




PLATE— ALICE OSLAND 



TRACE in the design and paint all the bands with Fry's 
Special Tinting Oil and dust with three parts Pearl Grey, 
one part Grey for Flesh and one-fourth part Yellow Green. 

This design can be made more simple if desired by omitting 



the part below the border. Leaves, Green Gold; berries a 
thin wash of White Gold. 

Second Fire — Light space at the edge of the plate is a very 
thin wash of Light Green Lustre. Go over gold if necessary. 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



76 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



SATSUMA BOX (Page 77) 

Edith Kredell 

OUTLINE entire design with mixture of Black and Blood 
Red, using enough Red to make the color about the same 
as unfired gold. 

Second Fire — Tint the star form and edges of the box with 
a Satsuma tint. All geometric forms, Gold. 

Third Fire — Put on the enamels. Leaves and stems two 
shades of Green. Oranges, Orange. Blossoms, white, slightly 
toned with Yellow and Black. As it is difficult to get the 



bright orange color in enamel, an extra fire may be given, re- 
touching and shading the enamels with flat color. 

SATSUMA BOX (Page 77) 

Lethia Brownson 
'T^HIS design was executed in enamels with no gold. The 
-*- outline is Black, but very fine. The colors used are 
Grey, Blue, Green and Lavender, all very soft. The small 
medallion is placed in the centre of the inside of the box. 




COUPE PLATE— LAURA L. STODDARD 



A STUDY in browns with touches of blue and red. Out- 
lines, Auburn Brown and Yellow Brown. Design, 
Auburn Brown, Brown Green, Yellow Green. Backgrounds, 



Shading Green and Baby Blue for border part. Yellow Brown 
for centre. Berries, Blood Red and Yellow Red. 



HERAMIC STUDIO 



77 




f^lilKMell. 




SATSUMA BOX— EDITH KREDELL 

(Treatment page 76) 




SMALL SATSUMA BOX— TOLIE N. BENEDICT 

(Treatment page 78) 




SATSUMA BOX— LETHIA BROWNSON (Treatment page 76) 




I Q cz=i g I I g I I □ I. J D I 1 a i — i d ' — > a c 



SATSUMA BOX— MARIE CLAYBAUGH (Treatment page 78) 

CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



78 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



SATSUMA BOX (Page 77) 

Marie Claybaugh 

/^UTLINE Black, rather strong. Geometrical parts Gold. 
^^ In each", panel is one yellow and one purple chrysanthe- 
mum. After the enamel is laid the yellow flowers are shaded 
with Purple and the purple flowers have a touch of Yellow. 
The centres are Yellow Enamel slightly shaded with Brown. 
The leaves are shades of Soft Green Enamel. The other 
flowers are Violet and Blue Enamels with Yellow centres. 



SMALL SATSUMA BOX (Page 77) 

Tolie Beyiedict 
/^UTLINE, Black, softened with Blood Red. The ornament 
^^ is all in gold, except the flower and leaf forms which are 
in soft shades of enamel, Pink, Green, and Blue. 

The Osgood Art School has removed to New York City 
permanently and will hereafter be located at 181 W. 73rd St. 
Classe.s were resumed on July 14th. 





PLATE— LEO. J. KULL 




PAINT all bands with Apple Green, a 
little Violet and Grey for Flesh; leaves, 
stems of flowers and the outline in flower in 
Apple Green and a very little Yellow. Dark 
space back of flower is Gold. 

Second Fire — The grey backgi-ound is 
Pearl Grey and a very little Yellow painted on 
quite thin. Shade flowers and buds just a 
little toward the lower part with a thin wash of 
Yellow. Retouch the Gold. 



Full Size Section of Plate 

CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



79 




BOWL DESIGN— MARGUERITE MEACHEM 



PAINT light petals of violets with a thin wash of Yellow and 
for the darker petals add a little Yellow Brown. Leaves 
are two parts Grey for Flesh and one part Brown Green, small 



dark spaces around the leaves two parts, Yellow Brown and 
one part Grey for Flesh. 

Outer and inner bands are Gold. 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



80 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



SALAD BOWL (Page 81) 

Edith Kreiell 

OUTLINE design with Dark Green. 
Second Fire— Tint wide band Carnation, very delicate, 
the remainder of the geometric pattern Dark Green tinted to a 
medium tone. Add to the Dark Green some Yellow Green 
for the leaf forms and paint flowers with Carnation. 



Third Fire— Tint outside of bowl with two parts Dark 
Green and one part Pearl Grey. Clean out the pink only. 

Fourth Fire— Tint border and panel again with the same 
mixture and retouch the pink flowers. 

The inside of bowl should be tinted a delicate cream made 
of Yellow Brown and Albert Yellow. When quite dry, Ivory 
Glaze may be rubbed into this tint. Be careful that the inside 
is kept very light. 




PLATE— VIOLET HARVEY 



(Full size section, page 81) 



PAINT leaves with a thin wash of Yellow Green and a 
little Yellow Brown. Berries with Yellow Brown and 
a little Carnation. All geometric forms in gold. Second Fire — 



Tint background in border a soft ivory tone using a thin wash of 
two parts Yellow Brown and one part Yellow Green. Outline 
leaves with Grey for Flesh and a little Yellow Green. 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



81 



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SALAD BOWL— EDITH KREDELL 



(Treatment page 80) 






PLATE— O. A. DAVIS (Treatment page 85) 
(Foil size section) 



PLATE (Page 80)— VIOLET HARVEY 

(Full size section) 



82 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





'^:%-". ■•■'"' 





PLATE— ALICE JEFFRIES (Treatment page 85) 



PLATE— GRACE B. CROSS 





PLATE— J. R. SWARTZENDRUBER 



PLATE— O. A. DAVISON (Full Section page 81) 





FIRST PROBLEM— NETTIE RHODES FIRST4.PROBLEM— R. PETTERSEN 

CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



83 




CAKE PLATE— HELEN MAGNER (Treatment page { 



CAKE PLATE— VIOLET VIANT (Treatment page 84) 



If ,i 




PLATE— MARGUERITE DIXON 



PLATE— MARGARET HUNT 





PLATE— GRACE B. CROSS PLATE— THOS. J. CUTTING 

CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



84 



HERAMIC STUDIO 





DRESSER TRAY 

Lucile Turner 

OUTLINE, Deep Blue Green and Pearl Grey. Geometrical 
part of design, Deep Blue Green padded thin. Flowers, 
Rose. Leaves, Moss Green, shaded a little with Empire Green. 
Backgi-ound a cream tint. Yellow Brown and Albert Yellow. 
Centre left white. 

CAKE PLATE (Page 83) 

Helen Magner 

OUTLINE, Empire Green. Dark portions of design Empii-e 
Green with a little Yellow Brown. Tint over all a soft 
green made of Apple Green, Empire Green and Pearl Gi-ey. 
Wipe out the portions that are medium tone and in these spots 
tint Deep Blue Green. 




PLATE 

Martha Wistrand - 

OIL two outer bands and the lines dropping from it and 
dust with three parts Pearl Grey and one part Grey for 
Flesh. Oil leaves, stems and inner band and dust with three 
parts Pearl Grey and one part Apple Green then oil the flower 
and dust with two parts Pearl Grey and one part Peach Blossom. 




U 



FULL SIZE CORNER OF DRESSER TRAY— LUCILLE TURNER 



CAKE PLATE (Page 83) 

Violet Viant 

OUTLINE with Auburn Brown. Darkest parts. Brown 
Green. Flower and bud forms, one-third Yellow Brown 
and two-thirds Yellow Red. The backgi'ound is in three shades 
of tan, all being the same mixture of Yellow Brown and Black. 




\ 



FULL SIZE SECTION OF PLATE— MARTHA WISTRAND 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



heramic studio 



85 



PLATE (Page 81) 



0. A. Davis 



OIL stems, leaves and outer band and dust with one part 
Apple Green, one-half part Yellow Green and one part 
Pearl Grey. Oil flowers and buds and dust with two parts Sea 
Green and one part Banding Blue. If a background is desired 
paint it in the second fire with a thin wash of Pearl Grey and 
a very little Sea Green. 



PLATE (Page 82) 

Alice Jejfries 

OUTLINE, Grey Green. Second Fire — Dark Green over 
bands and medium portions of design. Darkest spots 
Violet No. 1, with a little Dark Green. 

Third Fire — Dark Green padded over entire border. Wipe 
out the Violet and renew it. When perfectly dry rub in Pearl 
Grey. 




PLATE— A. M. HARDMAN 



/OUTLINE, Black. Medium tone, Apple Green, tinted 

;|^ght. Dark part, Deep Blue Green toned with Apple 

:.A and Black. The lightest part of border, a cream tint 



of Trenton Ivory and a little Yellow Brown. This tint if 
delicate enough may be left over the Apple Green but the blue 
must be cleaned out. 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



86 



ri:ramic studio 






SEDJI BOWL— EDITH KREDELL 

THE design is outlined in Dark Green. The lines and larger 
triangles are Green Gold. The small triangles are Blue 
Enamel. The flower forms are Cream White with bright Yel- 
low dots in centres. The leaf forms are of Green Enamel a 
shade darker than the body of the Sedji. 

CYLINDER VASE 

Laura L. Stoddard 

THIS design is for lustres and metals. The outline is Black, 
quite strong. The lustres used are: Light Green, back- 
ground for band behind dragon fly. Dark Green, lower part 
of vase and eyes of fly. Opal, wings of dragon fly. Orange, 
background for daisies. Yellow, daisies. Brown, bodies of 
dragon and daisy heads. 

Metals: Roman Gold, top and bottom bands, stems and 
leaves. Antique Green Bronze, three remaining bands. 

The Green Lustre is run over the gold leaves to give metallic 
effect. The Yellow Lustre over the narrow bands hold the 
Orange and tints the daisies. 

VASE 

Carrie Nelson 

FIRST Fire — Outline with Dark Green and paint in Gold 
over darker part of design; 

Second Fire — Oil dark panels and bands with Grounding 
Oil and dust in Mat Bronze Green. Paint the remainder of 
vase with Light Green Lustre. 

Third Fire — Paint in Liquid Silver over light part of 
design and renew the Gold. 



CYLINDER VASE— LAURA L. STODDARD 

CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



t1 









VASE^VIOLET VIANT (Treatment page . 





mS^ 



VASE— CARRIE NELSON 



Lots 3o5.-toK, 

DRESSER TRAY— LOIS BOSTON (Treatment page < 



88 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



VASE (Page ^87) 

Violet Viant 

THIS design is for a small cylinder vase of Belleek. The out- 
line is Brown Green. 
Second Fire — The darkest portions, flower forms, are Violet 
of Iron. The next tone, leaf and stem forms and upper border, 
are Olive Green for Belleek. The lighter tones in the design are 
gold with a finger edge of gold at the top. 

Third Fire — Brown Green padded over all. Wipe out 
flower forms and retouch if necessary. Clean gold carefully, 
using alcohol, and renew the gold. 



DRESSER TRAY (Page d>7) 

Lois Boston 

OUTLINES, Auburn Brown. Flowers, Albert Yellow. 
Leaves, Grounding Green. Panels, one-half Trenton 
Ivory, one-fourth Yellow Brown, one-fourth Albert Yellow. 
Bands, Gold. 

The last fire, Trenton Ivory with a little Yellow Brown 
tinted over all. Gold cleaned and renewed. 




U Si't V \ ak OY o YV n 'i o t\ 



<^ 



TEA SET~LETHIA BROWNSON 



OUTLINE with Mason's Royal Blue and fire. 
For the second fire oil darkest parts of design with 
Special Tinting Oil and dust in a mixture of two parts Royal 
Blue and one part Pearl Grey. The next dark part is also oiled 
and dusted with Grounding Green. Small details Roman Gold 



and Green Gold. Third Fire— Tint over all a mixture of 
Brown Green and Yellow Brown, the Yellow Brown predomi- 
nating. Carefully clean the golds. 

Fourth Fire — Put the same tint again over the border por- 
tion and renew the golds. 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



89 




DRESSER TRAY—HELEN G. MORROW 

Outlines, Brown Green. Dark part of design, Burnish Silver. Triangular forms, Light Blue with Silver centres. Edge and 

centre panel tinted Cream. 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



90 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




DRESSER SET— MILDRED BROWN 

THE outlining was done in Black and all of the geometrical to mix and test to get exactly the right shades for these enamel 

ornament is Gold. The floral ornament is in enamels, flowers. The small panels in the border are tinted with Deep 

the large flowers are in shades of pink, quite delicate, the small Blue Green very thin and the centres and edges a pale cream 

flowers are blue and leaves a soft grey green. It is necessary color. 

CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



91 




RIM PLATE— MILDRED BROWN 



OUTLINE design in India Ink. Do this as lightly as pos- 
sible and use fine emery cloth or sand paper to make it 
smooth before applying color. Tint with mixture of Shading 



Green and Yellow Green. Clean out carefully that the edges 
of design are sharp. For the second fire tint entire rim of 
plate with the same mixture and pad very thin. 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 



92 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORFESPONDENTS 

Will Mrs. A. S. Potter kindly repeat her question for this column? The 
letter which was forwarded to the editor was unfortunately lost. 

Miss K.— Unfluxed gold will burnish off white china unless it is over 
a color. Enamels can be used over a painted surface. Paint and gold can 
be put on over lustre. If the unfluxed gold was on Belleek ware and comes 
out of the kiln looking rough it is probably over-fired, it will sink into the glaze. 
If gold is applied too heavy it will also look rough, but remains above the glaze. 
There is no unfluxed white or green gold." The gold was not applied properly 
when it does not burnish. There are many reasons for this; usually it is be- 



cau.s-e it was not kept perfectly clean, or you may have used a brush that had 
been used for colors. 

G. G. — The books j^ou mention are very good. "Dow's Composition 
and Design" is also a good one. Yes, the work should be kept flat when out- 
hned and when some shading is used it is also treated in a flat way. 

L. S. — Enamels should have a glazed finish when fired, when they have a 
(lull finish they are underfired. 

I. M. M. — The special oil called for in the treatment you mention is Fry's 
Special Tinting Oil. 




SEDJI SUGAR AND CREAMER— MARIE CLAYBAUGH 

Outline, Dark Green. Leaves, Empire Green. Bands, Green Gold. Flowers, Cream Enamel, shaded darker in centre. 
Stamens, Yellow Enamel. The design is evolved directly from analysis drawing of flower. 



CLASS WORK OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 







/* , /V,' "5 " 






I • »^E-E-T=» 


'TM E- 


F^l F^E- 


A-.L- 1 V^e:-. • 1 



CONTRIBUTORS 



ARTS AND CRAFTS SOCIETY, ORANGE, N. J, 

JESSIE M. BARD 

HARRIETTE B. BURT 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

A. W. DONALDSON 

HALLIE DAY 

WINIFRED S. GETTAMY 

OLGA GORENSEN 

NEWARK SOCIETY OF KERAMIC ARTS 

JEANNE M. STEWART 

WALTER S. STILLMAN 

GEORGD^ B. SPAINHOWER 

EDNA MANN SHOVER 

V. SIMKINS 



n/lGflZiriEfOR Til E POTTER AND DECOR«T0fV 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and thearticles mus t notbe reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF SEPTEMBER, 1912 



Editorial Notes 

Arts and Crafts Society of Orange, N. J. 

Round Box 

Creamer and Sagar 

Mt. Hood Lily 

Alder 

White Poppies (Sttpplement) 

Btitterfly Design for Plate 

Bowl 

Butterflies and Moths 

Butterfly Border Designs 

Butterfly Design for Vase 

Butterfly Studies 

Forget-me-nots 

Pyrethrum 

Radish Blossom and Seed 

Newark Society of Keramic Arts 

Ghost Flower or Indian Pipe 

Sumac 

Sassafras 

Answers to Correspondents 

Lessons for Beginners in Gold and Lustre for a Vase 

Scarlet Sage 

Scarlet Sage 

Clematis 



Hallie Day 

"Winifred S. Gettamy 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

Photo by Walter S. Stillman 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

Georgia B. Spainhower 

Olga Gorensen 

Georgia B. Spainhower 

Georgia B. Spainhower 

Georgia B. Spainhower 

Edna Mann Shover 

V. Simkins 

Photo by Walter S. Stillman 

A. W. Donaldson 

Photo by Walter S. Stillman 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
A. W. Donaldson 

Jessie M. Bard 
A. W. Donaldson 
Harriette B. Burt 
Harriette B. Burt 



Page 

93 

94-96 

94 

96 

97 

98 

98 

99 

99 

100 

100 

100 

lOi 

102 

103 

104 

105-107 

108 

109 

no 

no 

no, ni 

n2 
n3 
n4 



i6 



THE OLD RELIABLE IbEHH FITCH KILNS 



^t 




The thousands of these KHaa in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




^ 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 

Glaze and Color Tone ^SS^^^B^'^^tfi^ 

No. 2 Sl*eI4 X 12 to. $30.00 ) / No. J Size tO x 12 in $15.00 

No. 3 Sl«e 16 X J9 to 40.00 Gas Klin 2 sires Kfla 4 al.« P°- ^ Size 16 x 12 in. 20.00 

) v.a«co«iXBni»««.. < ^^2 Size J6 x 15 in. 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. I No. 4 Size Wx 26 to. 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



^ 



Vol. XIV. No. 5. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



September, I9I2 




T is a pleasure always to show Ker- 
amic. Studio readers the work of the 
Newark Society of Keramic Arts. 
This month we show also two photos 
of the exhibit of the Orange Societj^ 
of Arts and Crafts. It is a novel 
idea and a pleasing one, to carry out 
the same motif not only on each piece 
of a set of china but also on tray, 
linen, etc., as well. It will make a 



most attractive ensemble for a lunch or tea table. 



Next month we will illustrate the work of the Four Winds 
Summer School and an interesting exhibit our readers will 
find it. A few pieces finished at the last moment escaped the 
photographer but only a few. 

We find it more difficult every month to get really good 
flower studies both in color and black and white, especially of 
subjects not too hackneyed. We shall add to our competition 
to be closed the fifteenth of October the following prizes, in 
order to procure for our naturalistic friends some new and, we 
trust, better studies. 

For the best study in color of any flower, naturalistically 
treated, first prize $10.00; second prize, $5.00. 

For the best study in color, of any flower, semi-naturalisti- 
cally treated, first prize, $10.00; second prize, $5.00. 

For the best study in black and white, of any flower, 
naturalistically treated, $5.00. 

For the best study in black and white, of any flower, semi- 
naturalistically treated, $5.00. 

We would suggest that at this time of year new studies can 
be made of Phlox, Aconitum (Monkshood), Bell Flower, vari- 
ous Lilies, Delphinium (Larkspur), Stock, Salpiglossis (Velvet 
Flower or Painted Lady), various Dahlias, (show, shingle, 
decorative, collarette and cactus varieties,) Chrysanthemums, 
(old-fashioned, button, and show,) flowering shrubs, such as 
Clethia and Buddleya, Wistaria, Honeysuckle and a dozen other 
things special perhaps to your locality. 

The general feeling in regard to the suggestions made in 
last issue as to changes in Keramic Studio, seems to be that we 
do very well as we are. Some few would like crafts added, 
most prefer to keep Keramic Studio for ceramics exclusively. 
All the letters we have received speak approvingly of the 
photographs of flowers, several wish that they could be ac- 
companied by conventionalizations of the flower forms, and 
designs from them by way of illustration of how the photos 
can be used. To this end we will give a list of the photos on 
hand and ask our designers to send us on approval, a sheet of 
conventionalizations of each or any of the flowers and one or 
more designs based upon the conventionalizations. We have 
photos of German Iris, Cornflower or Bachellor's Button, 
Oriental Poppy, Columbine, Peony, Holly-hock, and all the 
flowers mentioned earlier on this page. 

Others ask for a page of designs for score and dinner 
cards, book backs for Graduation, Guest, Brides and Baby 
Books, also designs for little objects in china to be used for card 



prizes, Christmas presents, etc. We would be glad to have such 
designs submitted to us at an early date. 

We will ask our readers also to send us photos of attractive 
studios, novel and useful contrivances in studios, for use of 
teacher and pupil, work tables, etc., and of anything in this 
line that they think will be of interest to our readers. We wUl 
gladly pay for these photos if they can be used, also for any 
little articles along the lines suggested in the August issue. 
While we will not be able to open a serious crafts department 
as we had hoped, on account of the general feeling that it will 
interfere with the ceramics, we would be pleased with contribu- 
tions describing the methods of making any little article in 
metal, wood, embroidery, etc., suitable for Christmas. These 
should reach us before the last of October. 

We receive many letters, both of praise and otherwise, 
but the following letter is published, not so much for its com- 
mendation, as for the spirit it shows. If more of our readers 
would use the Keramic Studio published designs as inspira- 
tion rather than copy the forward movement in keramic work 
would be even more marked than it is. Such letters are wel- 
come visitors to the editorial table. 

"I enjoy the magazine immensely. Sometimes I would like to copy the 
designs published, as they are so beautiful, but I think I learn more by (nearly 
always) makmg my own designs, even though I camiot make nearly as good 
ones as the professional decorators who are your contributors. But I try to 
improve my taste by studying your illustrations, and I am just selfish enough 
to insist that I get something out of my work for viyselj when I am making 
pieces of china to give away or use in the house. It is such 'fun' to make a 
flesign, one enjoys the mental exercise even when the result is a failure. 

Your editorials are such a help, so original and artistic in tone and so 
frequently applicable to other things as well as to china decoration. I think 
we, who read and enjoy the many fine publications of our day, too often for- 
get to say a word of appreciation and gi-atitude to the publishers, writers and 
artists who contribute so much to our pleasure and our education. This is 
why I venture to say a word just now when the thought occurs to me. 

I do hope you wUl have the articles on 'methods of teaching, conductmg 
classes, etc.,' mentioned in the current number of Keramic Studio. I am sure 
they will be interesting to every reader, whether teacher, pupil or merely 
pri^-ate 'experimenter' like myself. AA'ith best wishes for the continued suc- 
cess of your magazine, I am," Very truly yours, L. B. M. 

Many readers desire the February, 1911, Keramic Studio. 
Here is an opportunity: 

"I have an extra Keramic Studio, February, 1911. Price 
postpaid $1.50. D. Fenton Frazier, 

Studio, 905 N. 9th St., Lafayette, Ind." 

Is it not "better business" to renew your subscription at 
once? 

STUDIO AND SHOP NOTES. 

Leah H. Rodman will, on September 1st, open a New York 
studio at 47 West 36th St. in the building to be occupied by the 
Art China Import Co. and she will also retain her Brooklyn 
studio at the present address, 7 Parkside Court, Flatbush. 

Miss Sally Holt, New Orleans, has moved to a more 
commodious studio at 1434 Pleasant St. 

The third annual exhibition of Decorated White China 
will be held at Burley & Co., 7 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111., 
beginning September 9th, 



94 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. IRENE GRANBERRY 

ARTS AND CRAFTS OF ORANGE, N. ). 

CRAFT work of all sorts for porch service formed the 
especial feature of the recent exhibition given by the 
Arts and Crafts Society of Orange, N. J. This Club has its 
quarters in a quaint old house, where a tea-room and per- 
manent exhibition and salesroom are maintained. There are 
also rooms free to the members for classes and for meetings. 

There are classes in the various crafts, most of which are 
free to the members. Ceramic workers will be interested in 
the way in which the designs were developed on the china. 
Perhaps a point ; overlooked by most workers on china is the 
relation of the decorated piece of china to its surroundings. 
In this exhibition, especial attention was given this side of the 
problem. The Club has had a class in design, this past winter, 
talight by Jetta Ehlers. From the work of this class designs 
were chosen and the members formed into groups to carry out 
the scheme. A group of needle-workers, executing the design 
on the linens, another group doing stencils, still another group 
doing china, and others the metal things and baskets. The 
result was a charming and most harmonious exhibit. The 
members whose designs were chosen for this special work are 
Mrs. Irene Cranberry and Mrs. John Lincoln Adams. Miss 
Mary Brigham designed the poster announcing the exhibition. 
The stand upon which the things are photographed was made 
by Miss Mahon. It was intended to inset panels using the 
same motif as used in the other pieces but lack of time prevented. 
Perhaps this suggestion will be of use to other clubs in getting 
up exhibitions. 




"^^^^ 



MRS. JOHN LINCOLN ADAMS 



MRS. CRANBERRY'S DESIGN 

Body of basket, grey green. Bands and handles, grey 
blue. Grapes, light grey green. Apple, same color as 
grapes only darker. Oranges, low toned orange. Leaves, 
grey green. 

MRS. ADAMS' DESIGN 

Body of basket, light brown. Handle and lines on 
basket, same, but much darker, Oranges, yellow brown. 
Grapes, Violet No. 2. Leaves, two tones of grey green. 

MT. HOOD LILY— (Page 97) 

Jeanne. M. Stewart 

UPON opening these flowers are pure white with mai'kings 
or spots of maroon. They gradually turn pink while 
the old blossoms beginning to fade are almost a purple. 

The following palette is used: Rose, Ruby Purple, Band- 
ing Blue, Lemon Yellow, Yellow Brown, Wood Brown, Maroon, 
Yellow Green, Turquoise Green, Brown Green, Shading Green 
and Grey. 

The shadows in white flowers are Grey and a little Lemon 
Yellow, with Lemon Yellow in depth or center of blossoms. 
The stamens are Yellow Brown shaded with Wood Brown 
which are a much deeper brown in the old flowers. To obtain 
the more purple pink of the faded flower use a little Banding 
Blue with the Rose and Ruby Purple in the shadows. The 
buds are white with shadings of Lemon Yellow and Grey. 
The leaves are more of the blue green tones. 




ROUND BOX 

Hallie Day 

TO be done in Coalport Green for triangle forms, and light 
part and triangle on side of box in Silver and the entire 
outline very fine in Black. 

SHOP NOTE 
The Art China Import Co., importers of white china for 
decorating and specialties of Bohemian Glassware, are moving 
this month to their new quarters at 47 W. 36th St., where 
they will occupy a four story building which they have leased 
for a number of years. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



95 




SPRING EXHIBITION ARTS AND CRAFTS SOCIETY OF ORANGE, N J. 



96 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SPRING EXHIBITION ARTS AND CRAFTS SOCIETY OF ORANGE, N. J. 



CREAMER AND SUGAR 

Winifred S. Gettamy 

TINT Yellow Ochre and Yellow Lemon. 
Center motif and handle, Yellow Ochre 
and Pompadour Red. Leaves Yellow Green, 
Shade Green and Yellow Ochre. Outline, 
heavily in Black. 

GHOST FLOWER— (Page 108) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

SKETCH design in carefully, then paint 
background in with Banding Blue, Vio- 
let and Apple Green. The flowers are ten- 
derly washed with a thin wash of Lemon 
Yellow. The stems are Lemon Yellow and 
Apple Green. 

Second Firing — Touch in shading of 
flowers with Apple Green and Violet. The 
stems are washed with a little Violet in the 
shadows. 




CREAMER AND SUGAR— WINIFRED S. GETTAMY 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



97 




MT. HOOD LILY— JEANNE M. STEWART 



(Treatment page 94) 



HHRAMIC STUDIO 





ALDER— PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



WHITE POPPIES— (Supplement) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

FIRST Firing — Paint in the dark touches around flowers 
with Copenhagen Blue and Violet; the leaves are Apple 
Green and Yellow; the dark leaves are Brown Green and 
Moss Green; buds are Moss Green and Brown Green; stems 
Yellow Green and Shading Green. Poppies: the shadows 
are Yellow and Violet and a little Grey for Flesh; the centers 
are Yellow and Yellow Brown; deepest touches are Brown 
Green. Background is Copenhagen Blue, Violet and Yellow 
Brown. Second Firing — Use same colors used in first firing for 
leaves, strengthen all the darks with Shading Green and a 
little Black; use a little Yellow in the poppies. 

BUTTERFLY DESIGN FOR PLATE— (Page 99) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE of design and black spaces are gold. Outline 
butterfly also. Second Fire — Paint a thin wash of 
Yellow Lustre on wings of butterfly and all the remaining 
gi'ey with Yellow Brown Lustre. An ivory tone may be 
painted over the background. 




FULL SIZE CENTER OF BOWL— OLGA GORENSEN 



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RERAMIC STUDIO 



99 




BUTTERFLY DESIGN FOR PLATE— GEORGIA B. SPAINHOWER 




BOWL— OLGA GORENSEN 



100 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




T 




BUTTERFLY DESIGN FOR VASE 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINES and all black spaces are painted with Black and 
fired . Second Fire — Tint all white spaces in the design and 
lower part of vase with a thin wash of Yellow Green to which 
a touch of Black has been added. Paint all the darker grey 
spaces with Dark Green and the lighter grey with Lemon Yel- 
low and a touch of Grey for Flesh. 

BUTTERFLY BORDER DESIGNS 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

FIRST, second and fifth borders may be outlined with 
Grey for Flesh and a little Blood Red. Light grey tones 
are Albert Yellow and a little Grey for Flesh and the darker 
tones are Blood Red and a little Grey for Flesh. Background 
is a thin wash of Pearl Grey and a little Yellow. 

Third Border — All of this design may be carried out in 
Green Gold except the body of the bug and the small square 
forms, which are painted in with Yellow Green and Apple Green. 

Fourth Border — Outline and body of bug in Gold. The 
light grey form is a thin wash of Yellow Brown Lustre. Dark 
bands Gold. 



BUTTERFLIES AND MOTHS— GEORGIA B. SPAINHOWER 



BUTTERFLY STUDIES— (Page lOI) 

Edna Mann Shover 

'HE butterflies on china are most effective done in lustres. 
Outline with firm Black outlines, then fire. Use Black, 
Yellow Brown, Steel Blue for the larger spaces, for the white 
spaces, which are to be the brightest colors, use Orange or 
Yellow lustre. 




r£m^ 



J«JHMi"aaBl!l~ 













II 



BUTTERFLY BORDER DESIGNS— GEORGIA B. SPAINHOWER BUTTERFLY DESIGN FOR VASE-GEORGU B. SPAINHOWER 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



lOI 







BUTTERFLY STUDIES— EDNA MANN SHOVER 




(Treatment page 100) 



102 



ri:ramic studio 



RADISH BLOSSOM AND SEED— (Page 104) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
'T^HE seeds and stems are Moss Green, Brown Green; the 
J- flowers are Lemon Yellow and Apple Green; the stamens 
are Yellow Brown. 

Second Fire — Outline design in Grey for Flesh. 
Third Firing — Wash background with Apple Green and 
Violet No. 2. Go over the flowers and seed pods again with 
colors used in flrst firing. 

SUMAC— (Page 109) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
Tj^LOWERS are painted in with Blood Red, Yellow Red, 
A Ruby Purple ; the stems are Blood Red and Violet ; the leaves 
are Moss Green, Shading and Violet; the light side of leaves 
are Apple Green and Violet. 



Second Firing — Paint backgi-ound with Violet, Blood Red 
and Brown Green. Then go over the flowers again using Yel- 
low Red and Blood Red on the light side and Blood Red and 
Roman Purple on shadow side. The leaves are strengthened 
with same colors used in first firing. 

SASSAFRAS— (Page 11 0) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
Tj^IRST Firing— Outline design in Black, then fire. 
-T Second Firing— Paint leaves with Moss Green and Brown 
Green, the flowers are Yellow Red and Yellow Brown. 

Third Firing — Paint backgi^ound in with Albert Yellow 
and Grey for Flesh; shade leaves with Yellow Green and Brown 
Green; stems with Moss Green and Brown Green; the flowers 
are shaded with Pompadour and Yellow Red. 




FORGET-ME-NOTS— V. SIMKINS 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



FLOWERS are Deep Blue Green, with touches of Banding 
Blue; the stems are Apple Green, and a little Shading 
Green; the stems are Moss Green, Shading Green and a little 
Violet, the buds are Rose and Deep Blue Green. Second Firing 



— Touch up flowers with Deep Blue Green, Violet No. 2; the 
centers are Lemon Yellow and Yellow Brown. Use same color 
for leaves used in first firing. Third Firing — The background 
is Grey for Flesh, Apple Green and Violet. 



HERAMIC STUDIO 



103 




PYRETHRUM^PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



PAINT flowers in very delicately with Blood Red, the 
centers with Albert Yellow, Auburn Brown and a little 
Yellow Brown. The flowers have a thin wash of Yellow around 
the centers, this is washed over the Blood Red. The stems are 



Violet and Brown Green, the foliage is Brown Green and Moss 
Green. Second Firing — Paint background with Albert Yellow, 
Blood Red and Violet; the flowers are washed with Rose and 
deeper shading in flowers with Blood Red added to the Rose. 



104 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




RADISH BLOSSOM AND SEED— A. W. DONALDSON 

(Treatment page 102) 



NEWARK SOCIETY OF KERAMIC ARTS 

ONE goes to an exhibition of the Newark Society of Ker- 
amic Arts with the feehng that it will be something very 
much worth while. This Club has long since established a 
reputation for strong and original work, and each season finds 
the workers adding to the strength and character of their ex- 
hibits. From the first, it has been the aim of the Club to de- 
velop the individuality shown in the early work of its members, 
and the results prove that the Educational Committees have 
chosen and managed the study courses with much wisdom. 

During the past season, special attention has been paid 
to the designing of Children's sets and the work exhibited 
would suggest that the problem had been a happy one. The 
photograph shows better than can any description the amount 
of charm and variety expressed by the members. All the sets were 
very pleasing, from Miss Harrison's very simple set with its "bun- 
ny" head, designed and applied in medallion form, and done in soft 
blue tones, to the more elaborate and strongly colored sets by 
Miss McDougall and Mrs. English. A motto added greatly 
to the interest of Mrs. English's set, and the child with animals, 
flatly treated in color and design, made Miss McDougall's set 
unique. Mrs. Rodeman showed a well balanced design in her 
"bunny and vegetable" motif and a nice feeling for color in 
the handling. Mrs. Waterfield's ducks, very pompous and 
amusing, made a splendid design against the unusually dark 
but good background color. 

In Miss Suhr's set the light and dark was nicely felt and 
the two chicks were nicely designed and linked by the straw of 
contention. Miss Condit accomplished a set of pleasing tone, 
and good design. The birds and blossoms were charmingly 
treated on Miss Ehlers' set, and made a distinctive note in the 
group. Miss Ehlers' strong work has always been an inspira- 
tion to the Club and many workers in keramics throughout 
the country. Her simple and refined handling of table service 
is well known, and the fruit set with its quaint basket-of-fruit 
motif shown this year is of particular interest. 

A little breakfast set that gave a great deal of pleasure 
was done by Mrs. Woodruff. It surpassed anything done be- 
fore by this member, and for an example of a discreet use of 
red it was worth noting. We confess to a sense of joy at each 
view, and while other and more ambitious pieces claimed our 
approval and admiration, yet we would often turn back to 
this little set with its refreshing charm. 

Another set very personal in design, by Miss Casperson, 
was a well thought out monogram, set into a "sprig" border. 
It was a successful variation of border and monogram design- 
ing. Mrs. King's breakfast set was well handled and showed 
nice feeling for color and design. The set designed by Miss 
McDougall, and executed by her in white and gold, was a good 
example of consistent design and color. The chocolate set 
by Mrs. Vail was imusual and pleasing with its rather severe 
treatment. Mrs. Van Voris was successful in applying a very 
interesting design to a difficult shape, making of the whole a 
very pleasing piece. 

Mrs. Waterfield's exhibit showed a great deal of character, 
a pitcher and bowl being of especial interest in design and color. 
Miss Harrison's work was a delight as usual. One found strength 
and refinement in design and color and that loving execution 
which has always marked her work for distinction. Besides her 
children's sets,her candlestick and fern jar gave particular pleasure. 

Another strong worker is Miss Foster, whose work this 
year in white and gold was fine in design and satisfying in color. 
The same motif, applied to plate, bowl and candlestick, with 
the necessary changes in the adaptation of the design to the 
various forms, was alone an interesting and profitable study. 



heramic studio 



105 






Mrs. Rodermann 


Miss Witter 






Miss Suhr 


Miss Leach 
Miss Cameron 




Miss Condit 


Mrs. Black 
Mrs. Nye 




Miss Ehlers Miss Forster 

SPRING EXHIBITION, NEWARK SOCIETY OF KERAMIC ARTS 



106 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




Mrs. Watcrfield 



Mrs. VanVoris 



Miss Harrison 




Mrs. Simonds 



Miss Lingley 



SPRING EXHIBITION, NEWARK SOCIETY OF KERAMIC ARTS 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



107 




Mrs. "Waterfield 



Mrs. Rodemann 



Miss Harrison 
Miss Suhr 



Miss Efalers 
Miss McDougall 
Mrs. English 



Miss Gondii 
Miss Harrison 




Mrs. King 



Miss Paine 
Mrs. English 



Mrs. Vail 
Mrs. "Woodrufi 



Miss McDougall 



Miss Douglass 
Mrs. Casperson 



SPRING EXHIBITION, NEWARK SOCIETY OF KERAMIC ARTS 



108 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




GHOST FLOWER OR INDIAN PIPE— PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 96) 



The work shown by Miss Lingly places her among the very 
best of the Club's designers. Her design for a child's set was 
strong and delightfully thought out and adapted. The choc- 
olate set with conventionalized yellow rose was extremely suc- 
cessful in design, and wonderfully lovely in color. 

Mrs. Simond's punch bowl was one of the important pieces 
in the exhibition. It was very unusual in color, and the touch 
of red, orange, and black in the border gave a brilliance to a very 
successfully designed and executed piece. The fern dish, by 
the same member, showed a good design of conventionalized 
animals, and a pleasing color harmony. 

Miss Leach had a thoughtful exhibit, one of her most 
pleasing pieces being a plate in yellow, black and gold. Miss 
Suhr's luncheon set was a nice bit of table service. A very 
satisfying little fern jar was designed and executed by Miss 
Cameron. It was particularly good, both design and color 
being in harmony with the purpose of the jar. Mrs. N^e's 
fern bowl was another harmonious piece of work. It was 
nice in color, thoughtfully designed and well executed. 

Although the children's sets were the strong notes in 
both Miss Condit's and Mrs. Roderman's exhibits, yet Mrs. 
Roderman's bowl was a very creditable piece of work and a 



plate by Miss Condit was excellent in design and color. In 
Mrs. Black's exhibit was a little bowl with a basket-of-fruit 
motif. It was charmingly suggested and well treated through- 
out. Miss Witter's exhibit showed study and care. One of 
her best pieces was a candlestick in gold and white. Miss 
Paine's bowl in lustres was harmonious in color. 

Miss Douglas was very successful in the design and color 
of her large pitcher. The problem was a difficult one and very 
well and pleasingly solved. The color was particularly soft 
and quiet. Mrs. English's design expressed a quaint and 
individual point of view. Besides her table service for children 
was a deep plate of yellow earthen ware, decorated very flatly 
with flower and leaf motif. 

A few of the members allowed themselves not to be repre- 
sented. This is to be regretted, for one of the best lessons 
derived from an exhibition is one which reaches the exhibiting 
members through seeing their work in association with that of 
many other minds of different points of view. The standards 
of the Newark Club have always been so high that to find one- 
self represented at the annual exhibition is a distinction which 
all members should be jealous of receiving. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



109 




•• 4 



SUMAC— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



(Treatment page 102) 



no 



IlERAMIC STUDIO 




SASSAFRAS— A. W. DONALDSON 
(Treatment page 102) 



LESSON FOR BEGINNERS IN GOLD AND LUSTRE FOR 
A VASE 

Jessie M. Bard 

TAKE the width of one section of the design and find how 
many times it will go around your vase. The vase in 
the illustration has four sections. Draw a line around the 
vase at the top and bottom of where the main part of the design 
will come ; it will aid you in keeping the design straight. 

This can be done with a gauge or banding wheel but where 
neither are to be had the narrow strip of paper may be used by 
measuring from the bottom of the vase up, measuring all 
around the vase about an inch and a half intervals and then 
drawing as straight a line as possible, free hand, between these 
marks. Then divide the vase in as many parts as the design 
will fit on your vase. All division lines should be fine India 
Ink lines. 

Make a careful tracing of the design and transfer it to the 
vase according to previous instructions. Outline with a fine 
grey India Ink line being very careful to keep the character of 
the flowers. Watch the width of the background spaces more 
than the spaces of the design. Too much care and thought 
cannot be given to this matter; it cannot be hurried. Put in 
all the design with Roman Gold, both the outline and the wide 
bands, with the exception of the stamen in the flowers and the 



dark spot in the buds. It is then ready 
to fire. Give gold a hot fire the first time. 
Second Fire — Go over the entire 
vase with Light Green Lustre. If the 
lustre is fresh use it just as it is, otherwise 
add a few drops of Lavender Oil to thin it. 
Be sure that the room is free from lint 
and also that everything you use is per- 
fectly clean. Pour a little of the lustre 
in a china slant or a small concave dish 
and with a No. 6 square shader that has 
been used for nothing else but lustre 
apply the lustre to the vase. Fill the 
brush well with the lustre and apply it 
as evenly as possible without working 
back into your last stroke. Work very 
quickly for the lustre dries rapidly and 
if the edges become dry it will show your 
brush strokes. Have a nice pad ready 
before beginning the work; the cotton 
should be free from knots and the silk free 
from wrinkles. As soon as the vase is 
covered with the lustre it should be 
padded until it looks perfectly smooth. 
All imperfections will be gi-eatly increased 
after the fire so do not hope that it will look all right after the 
fire. If it is not a perfect piece of work wipe it off with alcohol 
and be sure to wipe off all the alcohol. Never use turpentine 
with lustre. 

When the tinting is satisfactory wipe the color from the 
flowers and buds. The color can be wiped out by wrapping a 
small bit of cotton very tightly around the end of a brush handle ; 
it can be moistened with alcohol or water but care must be taken 
not to have too much in it so that it spreads beyond your line. 
Especial care must be taken with the alcohol as it spreads very 
easily. 

When it is perfectly clean paint a thin wash of Yellow Lustre 
over the parts wiped out using about a No. 4 square shader. 
Never put a lustre brush away without cleaning it. Clean it 
well with turpentine and be sure that all of the lustre is out of 
it and then clean out the turpentine with alcohol. Rub the 
brush back and forth against your hand until it is perfectly dry 
and fluffy. 

Third Fire — Go over all the wide vertical lines with Green 
Gold and all lines going round the vase and the outlines of 
flowers with the Roman Gold. Paint in the stamen and the 
dark spot in the bud with Yellow Red paint. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

L. C. — Try using a little china eraser on the spot. The pompadour and 
carnation are probably not fired hot enough. There should be no trouble m 

glazing them. 

L. L. Mc. — Silver should be polished the same as gold. Mix a \'cry little 
oil of tar with the powder silver, hardly enough to hold the powder together 
and then thin it with oil of lavender. Silver should be applied in two very 
thin washes, if it is applied too heavy it has the effect you speak of. Try 
light green lustre over the silver. One of the most satisfactory ways to buy 
it is in a paste and is called White Gold. 

Miss McL. — M. & H. Outlming Black is made by Mueller & Hennig, 
Dresden, Germany and may be procured from any of the leading art dealers. 

A. C. S. — Powdered zinc is used for cleaning the carbon out of a kiln. 

A. F. P. — ^We would advise you to leave the set as it is for the lustre 
would be just an experiment. 



HERAMIC STUDIO 



in 




VASE— JESSIE M. BARD 



112 



ni:RAMIC STUDIO 




SCARLET SAGE— A. W. DONALDSON 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



If3 



SCARLET SAGE 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE leaves are painted in with Brown Green, Moss Green; 
the stems are Blood Red and Yellow Brown; the flowers 
are Albert Yellow and Yellow Red. 

Second Firing — The background is painted in with Yellow 
Brown and Blood Red with a little Grey for Flesh. Go over 
the flowers again with coloring used in first firing. 
1^ '' Third Firing — Outline design with Blood Red. 



CLEMATIS— (Page 114) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

FLOWERS are painted in with Violet No. 2 and Banding 
Blue the coloring toward center is Banding Blue with a 
little Roman Purple; the leaves are Shading Green, Moss 
Green, and Apple Green; the stems are Violet No. 2 and Blood 
Red; the stamens are Apple Green. Second Firing— Wash 
in background with Violet, Blood Red and Apple Green, use 
same colors in flowers and leaves used in the first firing. 



SCaRLiCT 
SAGC. 



^S 










SCARLET SAGE— HARRIETTE B. BURT 



Il4 



hekamic studio 




CLEMATIS— HARRIETTE B. BURT 



(Treatment page IlS) 



K-EL-EL-T=> 



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CONTRIBUTORS 



E. L. BAKER 

JESSIE M, BARD 

HARRIETTE B, BURT 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

CLARA L. CONNOR 

ALICE W. DONALDSON 

FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMIVDER SCHOOL 

PEARL MONRO 

ADAH S. MURPHY 

PAULPIERING 

EDITH ALMA ROSS 

OLGA SORENSEN 

JEANNE M. STEWART 



OCT. MCMXII Price 40c. Yearly Sitocriptto 



A 



nflCftZIHE FOR rnf POTTER AND DECORATOR- 



The entire contentsof this Magazineare covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CX)NTENTS OF OCTOBER, 1912 



P-^^B* 



Editorial 

Four Winds Pottery Summer School Ceramics 

Green Grapes 

Red Grapes 

Bloe Grapes 

Conventional Grapes 

Plate Design, Black-eyed Susan 

Tobacco Jar 

Dahlias 

Rectangular Box 

A. D. Cap and Saucer 

Elderberry 

Plate 

Bowl or Round Tile 

Amaryllis (Supplement) 

Evening Primrose 

Conventional Amaryllis 

Answers to Correspondents 



Kathryn E. Cherry 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Olga Sorensen 
E. L. Baker 
Paul Piering 
Harriette B. Burt 
Adah S. Murphy 
Clara L. Connor 
Jeanne M. Stewart 
Edith Alma Ross 
Pearl Monro 
A. W. Donaldson 
A. W. Donaldson 
A. W. Donaldson 



Page 
US 

115-122 
123 

124-125 
126 
127 
128 
128 
129 
130 
130 
131 
J 32 
133 
134 
134 
134 
134 



t6 



m!^ FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



"€ 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 Sizel4xt2in $30.00) irjo.t Si»e JO x 12 in. $15.00 

No. 3 Size 16 , 19 in 40.00 Gas Kiln 2 sizes ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^ ^_^^^^ U,^ 2 Sl« 16 x 12 In. i.. 20.00 

„ Not 5 Size 16 x 15 to. 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 Size 18 x 26 to, 60JtM 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



9 




y 



Vol. XIV. No. 6. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



October 191 2 




T is with a gi'eat deal of pride and 
pleasure that the editor presents 
this month the ceramic work of the 
summer school at Four Winds Pot- 
tery, since it was done in her pottery 
studio, by her friends, the pupils; 
under her friends, the faculty; in 
her summer vacation, and added 
materially to the pleasure and profit 
of over sixty souls, including her 
friends, the faculty. And bye the bye, please note the clear 
photographs we have had taken, so many send us photographs 
of china so badly taken that they are hardly worth publishing. 
A pointer to those who are taking photographs of china for 
publishing in Keramic Studio — rub the surface toward the 
camera, also insides of rims, bowls, plates, etc., with soft putty; 
it will take off the too strong reflections and show the designs 
better; also, take note that a light backgi'ound gives a better 
effect than a dark one, and that a better effect is made by 
grouping a few pieces, than by crowding a conglomerate mixture 
into one photograph. 

Do not forget our various competitions, now that the fall 
season is at hand and work has begun in the studios; before the 
rush comes get your designs carefully thought out and executed 
and remember that good executions go a long way. Many 
an otherwise indifferently good design has been accepted be- 
cause of the neat and workmanlike execution, whereas many 
really good designs have been refused because so carelessly 
done that their good points were lost. Be sure and mark every 
design plainly on the back with name and address and pin or 
fasten to it a separate sheet with the color scheme and treat- 
ment in mineral colors. Mail flat so the design can be easily 
seen, and enclose stamps so that the designs may be promptly 
returned if not available. We trust that we will have a real 
Christmas surprise box full of good stuff for future issues of 
Keramic Studio. 

GREEN GRAPES— (Page 122) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

PAINT grapes with Apple Green and Lemon Yellow very 
delicate on hght side. Shading Green very thin on shadow 
side with a little Violet on the dark accents. The stems are 
Violet No. 2 and Blood Red. The leaves are Shading Green 
and Violet for the darker tones and Moss Green and Y'ellow 
on the light tones. The background is Lemon Yellow, Shading 
Green, Copenhagen Blue. 

Second Firing — Wash a thin wash of Lemon Yellow on 
lighter side of leaves and Yellow Green over shadow side; put 
the dark touches with Brown Green and Shading Green. The 
grapes are touched up with same colors used in first firing. 

RED GRAPES— (Page 124) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

THE leaves are painted in with Pompadour and Violet and 
Yellow Brown for the light grapes, for the dark ones use 
Blood Red, Roman Purple and Violet. The leaves are Yellow 



Green, Brown Green on light side and Shading Green, Brown 
Green and Violet No. 2 on dark side. The stems are Violet 
and Blood Red. The background is Yellow Brown, Violet 
No. 2 and Grey for Flesh. Second Fire — Use same colors for 
retouching as used in first firing. 

RED GRAPES— (Page 125) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

LEAVES are painted in with Lemon Yellow, Apple Green 
and just a little Brown Green on light side. Brown Green, 
Shading Green and Violet on shadow side. The back of leaves 
are Violet and Apple Green. Grapes are Blood Red and Violet 
for the light grapes, Blood Red and Roman Purple on shadow 
side. The stems are Yellow Brown and Blood Red with 
touches of Brown Green. 

Second Fire. — Wash a thin wash of Yellow on light side 
of leaves, a little Yellow Green on shadow side. The veins in 
leaves are Blood Red and Violet. The grapes are strengthened 
with same colors used in first fire. The background is put in 
with Copenhagen Blue, Violet and Brown Green. 
,?» ^ 
FOUR WINDS POTTERY SUMMER SCHOOL 

THE Four Winds Summer School was unusually successful 
for the first season, the attendance numbering sixty al- 
together, the ceramic class claiming twenty and the rest of 
the pupils being divided between the sketching, pottery, metal, 
leather and basketry classes and the children's classes in 
basketry and sewing for the girls, carpentry for the boys. 

Altogether it was a delightful six weeks. The weather was 
at its best and the outdoors vied with the attractions of the 
indoor classes. The classes in ceramic design and decoration 
were full to over-flowing both with pupils and enthusiasm and 
the quantity of work executed was truly remarkable consider- 
ing its fine quality. 

The accompanying photographs show most of the import- 
ant pieces although perhaps a dozen escaped the photographer, 
being taken away before he arrived. It would be difficult to 
select the best pieces among so many good ones but we will 
mention a few to give an idea of the general effect of the work. 

A number of pieces were executed on the Satsuma ware 
which proved very popular on account of the soft mellow tone 
which it gives. Among the most satisfactory pieces were 
the small cylindrical vases executed by Miss Browning, Miss 
Weed, Mrs. DeLano, Miss McCoy, Mrs. Holland. These were 
executed in different shades of gold on the Satsuma gi'ound, 
with outlines at times in black and touches of flat enamels in 
the flowers. The tea caddies of Mrs. DeLano, Mrs. Hopton 
and Miss McCoy were executed in the same style, also the 
marmalade jar of Mrs. Chadwick and the small bowls by Miss 
Clapp, Mrs. Brown, Mrs. DeLano and Mrs.Hopstein. The small 
bowls were particularly choice in design and color. 

Some very attractive teapots and cups and saucers were 
executed on the celadon Sedji ware, the designs being in silver 
with touches of flat enamels. The teapots of Miss McCoy and 
Mrs. Hopstein were particularly nice. 

A number of large vases, round serving trays and plates 
were etched and decorated in various shades of gold combined 



116 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




Miss Bertha Riblet Mrs. A. A. Robineau 

Miss Jessie M. Bard Mrs. Kathryn E. Cherry Mr. Dawson Watson 



with yellow and orange lustre, the large serving tray by Miss 
Hetlage being the inspiration. The principal pieces carried 
out in this style were the plates by Mrs. Chadwick and Mrs. 
Hopton; the vases by Mrs. Hopstein, Miss Neally and Mrs. 
Donovan; the candlestick by Miss Hill and the serving trays 
by Miss Weed and Miss Neally. 

Several round and cylindrical vases were effectively 
decorated with birds and flowers in rich browns, greys and 
blacks on an olive lustre ground. Among the most successful 
were those belonging to Miss Maud Myers, Mrs. Hopstein and 
Mrs. Holland. 

A number of dainty semi-conventional pieces were at- 
tractively executed by the beginners in ceramic decorations, 
the creamers of Miss Jean Roberts and Miss Weed being 
especially attractive. Most of these pieces were painted with 
dainty little roses enclosed in decorative panelling in gold. 

In the dusted color work the bowl of Miss Browning was 
unusually successful the soft tender shades of grey, green and 
yellow blending perfectly into the creamery glaze of the bowl. 
Other attractive pieces in this style of execution were the bowls 
by Miss Weed in browns and that of Mrs. Donovan in blue 
and green on white. The comport of Miss Browning in green, 
the fernery of Miss Hill and the marmalade jar of Miss Irene 
Muller in blue and white, were quite unusual in effect and 
the large serving trays of Miss McCoy, Mrs. Chadwick, Mrs. 
Scott Smith, Miss Hill, Miss Clapp and Mrs. DeLano were 
very striking, both in design and color. In fact there was not 
an unsuccessful piece and those we have not room to mention 
were equallj^ dainty and successful. 




Mrs. V. E. Hopstein. 



Miss E. Hall. 



Flavia E. Holland. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



117 





#' 



fl^lS^-xmmm^\ 



Mrs. L. R. DeLano. 



Myrtle McCoy. 
Jean Roberts, 



Myrtle McCoy. 




Flavia E. Holland. 



Addie Weed. 



Irene MuIIer 



Flavia E. Holland. 



118 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Elsie E. Browning 

Jean Roberts 



Jean Roberts 

Grace H. Neally 



Jean Roberts 
Mrs. L. R. DeLano Myrtle McCoy 



Addie Weed 




Elsie E. Browning Jessie L. Clapp Bessie L. Hill 



Mrs. W. E. Hopton 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



119 




Mrs. H. K. Chadwick 



Mrs. Paul A. Donovan Mrs. "W. E Hopton 





Mrs. L. R. DeLa 



Elsie E. Browning Miss Hetlage 



Addie Weed 



120 



PLERAMIC STUDIO 



.^^ 




Jean Roberts 
Mrs. "W. K Chadwick 



Myrtle McCoy 
Jessie Clapp 



Grace H. Neally 
Grace H. Neally 



Mrs. Geo. Brown 




-^•' 



Mrs. V. E. Hopstein Jean Roberts Mrs. L. R. DeLano Mrs. L. R. DeLano Grace H. Neally Myrtle McCoy 



KEKAMIC STUDIO 



121 





Mrs. John Garnett 



Bessie L. Hill Mrs. Scott Smith 



Jean Roberts 




J 



Jessie Clapp Myrtle McCoy Bessie L. Hill Jean Roberts Mrs. V. E. Hopstein 



122 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





Jean Roberts Mrs. W. E. Hopton Myrtle McCoy 



Mrs. V. E. Hopstein 




Elsie E. Browning 



Myrtle McCoy 

Mrs. Paal A. Donovan 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



J23 




GREEN GRAPES— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



(Treatment page 115) 



i24 



n^RAMlC STUDIO 




nilRAMIC STUDIO 



125 




RED GRAPES— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



(Treatment page 115) 



126 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




BLUE GRAPES— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



(Treatment page 130) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



127 




CONVENTIONAL GRAPE PANEL— OLGA SORENSEN 



(Treatment page 130) 



128 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE DESIGN, BLACK-EYED SUSAN— E. L. BAKER 



OUTLINE design in Black and put bands in Gold. Sec- 
ond Fire. — Paint flower and the wide space between 
the two lower bands with a thin wash of Lemon Yellow and 
a touch of Grey for Flesh. Leaves and the outer space around 



flower, Moss Green, a little Shading Green and a touch of 
Black. Background in wide flower band Yellow Brown and 
a little Auburn Brown. Center of flower Vandyke Brown. 
Go over gold again. 




TOBACCO JAR— PAUL PIERING 



(Treatment page 130) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



129 




DAHLIAS— HARRIETTE B. BURT 



(Treatment page 133) 



J30 



MIRAMIC STUDIO 




RECTANGULAR BOX 

Adah S. Murphy 

OUTLINE flowers and leaves in Black. Panels in gold. 
Make center flower yellow, shaded darker at bottom, 
with red center. Flower at right side mulberry. Flower 
at left side, blue. Leaves green. 



BLUE GRAPES (Page 126) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

THE leaves are painted in with Moss Green, Yellow Brown 
and Albert Yellow on light side and Brown Green, Yel- 
low Green and touches of Blood Red on shadow side. The 
veins of leaves are Violet. The grapes are Banding Blue, 
Violet No. 2 on light side. Banding Blue, Copenhagen and a 
little Roman Purple on the dark side. The stems are Blood 
Red and Violet. The background is painted in with Violet 
No. 2, Blood Red and Yellow Green. 

Second Firing — Wash Deep Blue Green over the light side 
of the bunch of grapes, Violet No. 2 on shadow side. In the 
deepest touches use Banding Blue, Black and Roman Purple. 
Use same colors for retouching the leaves. 

CONVENTIONAL GRAPE PANEL— (Page 127) 

Olga Sorensen 

THIS design can be repeated around a cylindrical vase with 
good effect. An attractive treatment is to draw the 
design carefully and outline in Copenhagen Blue. Dust the 
background with the same color. After firing, dust the entire 
vase with Copenhagen Blue or Grey Green, according to shade 
desired. 

TOBACCO JAR 



/^UTLINE design in Gold. 



(Page 128) 

Paul Piering 
Second Fire. — The small 
flower form above and below center line, Orange Lustre, 
also the center pointed figure in lower fan shaped figure — body 
of beetle. All dark background a thin wash of Yellow Brown 
Lustre. Third Fire. — All light parts of design Yellow Lustre. 
Go over the Orange Lustre with the same. 




AFTER DINNER CUP AND SAUCER 

Clara L. Connor 

FIRST Fire— Outlines in Pompadour with sugar 
water. Tint all over with a very thin coat of 
equal parts of French Grey and Pompadour. 

Second Fire.— Go over design, handles and 
feet with Pompadour and French Grey. Retouch 
outlines if necessary. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



m 






ELDERBERRY— JEANNE M. STEWART 



(Treatment page 134) 



132 



heramic studio 




PLATE— EDITH ALMA ROSS 

OUTLINE flower with Blood Red. Paint leaves with Yellow and a very little Yellow Brown. The dark space 

Yellow Brown, a little Brown Green. Dark figures in center with Yellow Brown. When color is dry put in dots 

between panels Hasburg's Green Gold. with Yellow Red and a little Yellow Brown. Background 

Second Fire— Paint flower with a thin wash of Lemon back of dark part of design a thin wash of Apple Green. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



J33 



DAHLIAS— (Page 129) 

Harriette B. Burt 

PAINT the flowers in Yellow Gold, the leaves in Green Gold, 
first drawing outline in Light Brown. After firing cover 
the flowers with Ruby Lustre, the leaves with Green Lustre, 
the backbground with Yellow Lustre. 

For the third fire, cover entire piece with Orange Lustre 
thin and strengthen the outlines with the powder brown mixed 
with sugar and water. If the colors come out too strong, 
cover with Yellow Lustre and fire again. 



STUDIO NOTES 

It will interest our Northwestern subscribers to know that 
a Club was formed last spring of St. Paul and Minneapolis 
china workers. Meetings are held regularly and a course in 
design by Miss Louise Pinkney was the feature of the summer 
work. The'officers are: Miss Elizabeth Hood, St. Paul, Presi- 
dent; Miss M. Etta Beede, Minneapohs, Vice-President; 
Mrs. Josephine Alcott, Treasurer. ; Mrs Winifred Sandy, Secre- 
tary, 2205 Chicago Avenue, Minneapolis. 




BOWL OR ROUND TILE— PEARL MONRO 



OUTER band is Dark Green painted on. The next line 
and the design leading from it Yellow Brown and a 
little Carnation, also the five small spots in center. Re- 



mainder of the design Moss Green and a little Brown Green. 
Backgi'ound may either be left white or tinted a soft ivory. 



134 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENCE 

G . P. — You probably did not use the right proportion of sugar and water 
for the outhning, sometimes it works better after it has been mixed awhile. 

Making enamel of relief white and a little color is alright but it requu-es 
a hot fire which is usually an objection for the last fire. 

O. F. — There is a cement for mending china which comes in the powder 
form and can be bought from any art dealer. Mix a little of it with warm 
water using a bone knife, to the consistency of thick cream and spread it 
over the crack and when dry give it a light fire. Mix fine clay with water 
for mending a kiln, just thin enough to spread even over the cracks. Cam- 
pana's plate divider is good for cups, vases and any round surface. 

M. J. — As an example of semi-naturalistic treatment of flowers wc would 
call attention to the beautiful study of Amaryllis, by Alice WiUits Donaldson, 
in this issue of Keramic Studio. Personally ,we prefer this style of study to 
the naturalistic, but we will he glad to see some really good studies in the lattej- 
stj^e. 

M. C. — The antique bronze and red bronze were applied too heavy, they 
should have two thin apphcatiors. The gold manufactured by the firm you 
mention is very satisfactory. 




EVENING PRIMROSE 

A. W. Donaldson 

THE flower should be painted with Albert Yellow, the 
leaves, etc., with Grey Green three-fourths, Albert 
Yellow one-fourth. The background dusted with Pearl Grey, 
outline in Grey Green. 

Second Fire — Dust over entire design and background 
with Pearl Grey. 




CONVENTIONAL AMARYLLIS 

Alice W. Donaldson 

TO be used on vase or pitcher with bands at top and bottom. 
Outline design carefully with Black and fire. Paint 
flowers with Yellow Brown and Grey for Flesh. The leaf 
forms with Yellow Green and Yellow Brown. The space 
between leaves and stems with Grey for Flesh and Apple 
Green. Third Fire — Oil piece decorated with Fry's Special Oil 
padded dry and powder the color on, using three parts Pearl 
Grey, one part Yellow Brown and then clean out the flowei's 
by using cotton end of sharpened brush handle. 

ELDERBERRY— (Page 131) 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

THE elderberry of the Pacific Coast is a brighter blue with 
more of the bloom than found on the elderberry of the 
middle west. 

Stewart's Blackberry is used for the berries which are laid 
in in masses with lights picked out with pointed bush to indi- 
cate shape of berries. The lighter ones should be kept very 
light in first fire, with but a thin wash of Banding Blue, while 
high lights are left white. 

The leaves are a rich dark green and background shading 
from a light tone of gi'ey to a mixture of Stewart's Grey and 
Blackbeiry in darker ^tones. 




AM A RYLLI S— ALICE WILLITS DONALDSON 



OCTOBER 1912 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF NOVEMBER, I9I2 



Editorial Notes 

Borders 

Plate 

Tea Caddy and Bowl 

Mountain Ash 

Plate and Sagar Bowls 

Double and Triple Columbine 

Plate, Cup and Saucer 

Columbine 

Plate, Cup and Saucer 

Mountain Laurel 

Cup and Saucer 

Cherries 

Plate, Cup and Saucer 

Long Spurred Columbine 

Plates, Cups and Saucer 

Study of Snow Ball Flower 

Cup and Saucer 

Kansas City Ceramic Qub Exhibit 

Exhibition of the Burlingame California Class of Miss Lola 

Harrison Yellow Rose 

Answers to Correspondents 

Snap Dragon (Supplement) 



A. W. Heckman 

A. W. Heckman 

A. W. Heckman 

A. W. Heckman 

A. W. Heckman 

Photo by W, S. Stillman 

A. W. Heckman 

V. Simkins 

A. W. Heckman 

Harriette B. Burt 

A. W. Heckman 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

A. W. Heckman 

Photo by W. S, Stillman 

A. "W. Heckman 

Daisy Zug 

A. W. Heckman 

A. Willits 

Photo by W. S. Stillman 

Harriette B. Burt 



Page 

J 35 
J 36 
137 
138 
139 
140 
Hi 
142 
143 
144 
145 
H6 
147 
US 
149 

150-152 
151 
153 

154-155 
155 
156 
156 
142 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORiaiNAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




^ 



THE OLD RELIABLE Mm FITCH KILN: 




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The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 Size 14 x J2 in $30.00 ) / No. J Size JO x 12 ixu $15.00 

No. 3 Size J6 x 19 in 40.00 Gas Kil. 2 shes ) ^^ ^ gize 16 x 12 in. 20.00 

1 No. 3 Size 16 x 15 in. 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 Size is x 26 in. saoo 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



y 



Vol. XIV. No. 7. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



November 191 2 




E illustrate this month the work of 
the Kansas City Club and the San 
Francisco Class of Miss Willitts. 
We are always glad to show the 
work of clubs and classes, if inter- 
esting, but we must refuse hereafter 
to publish photographs which are 
too small, too crowded, too indis- 
tinct, too dark or too full of high 
lights. They make very poor re- 
productions and do not do justice either to the work or to 
Keramic Studio. We suggest if you wish to show photos 
of work, that you have them taken by a good photographer 
on a plate that is five by seven at least. Before photographing 
dab the pieces with soft putty to remove the too strong reflec- 
tions and high lights and use a light background. It is also well 
to bear in mind that dark and light pieces should not be photo- 
graphed together; Pieces should be selected as much as possible 
in the same color schemes. For instance, a group of blue and 
white, a group of gold decorations, a group of brown and greens, 
a gi'oup of pinks and yellows, etc,, etc., dark pieces needing a 
different time exposui-e from light pieces. Attention to all 
these little details will add greatly to the effect of work shown 
photographically. Photographs of china should be taken with 
a camera having a good lens and on special plates. Photo- 
graphs taken with an ordinary small amateur camera are gen- 
erally worthless. 

As we go to press the competition material is arriving in a 
flood, a peep into some of the packages assures us of an inter- 
esting lot to show our readers for the Christmas issue, so you 
can safely whet your appetite for the Christmas feast. 
►J' 

We are printing this month a number of designs by Albert 
Heckman, because we have had many requests for simple 
designs for Christmas work. We wish to call attention to the 
beautifully neat execution of the designs, and impress on our 
designers the great advantage of careful execution for repro- 
duction. We regret that through some one's carelessness 
the color directions written by Mr. Heckman himself, were lost 
at a moment too late to get new treatments and we have been 
obliged to content ourselves with hastily written color notes. 
But the designs are so beautifully simple that the ceramic 
worker ought not to find much difficulty in carrying them out 
to his own satisfaction. 

Will our readers, students or teachers, who have attractive 
studios, send us photographs of their pet corners or any particu- 
larly interesting spot, of their work tables arranged for work, 
of any especially helpful contrivance of their own. We would 
like to make up some pages of such views with the idea of help- 
ing others to arrange their own studios more conveniently or 
attractively. We will gladly pay for the photographs. We 
wish some more of our good teachers would send us "Helpful 
Hints." We have had lately a number of letters from appreci- 



ative readers which have been very encouraging. Now we 
would like to find some new ideas for our readers. Have you 
not each of you some thought that would be worth while, help- 
ful and encouraging to other workers? 

Who will send us right away, some nice designs of holly 
berries or mistletoe for little things for Christmas? We would 
like them by November fifth at the very latest and earlier if 
possible? Will some one send us little things designed for 
card party prizes for Valentine favors, for Easter gifts? Designs 
for little things to make are always acceptable. We have 
plenty of plate designs and large things. Send us something 
dainty both in design and color scheme. 

We have a plan for another year that may evolve into 
something worth while to our Keramic workers. The plan, as 
yet, is vaguely outlined in our minds and is something like this: 
Keramic Studio annual Christmas sale. Little things in china 
for Christmas gifts, nothing over ten dollars; sale to be held 
first at the office of Keramic Studio and then in some other city 
or cities. All work to pass a jury. Work from unknown 
ceramists to be judged by photograph before sending; a small 
percentage to be charged to cover expense of handling. Con- 
tributors who pass a certain standard to be craftsmen mem- 
bers of the Keramic Studio Keramic Guild. Those passing 
a still higher standard to be "Master Craftsmen" of the Guild. 
Those passing a certain lower standard to be "Apprentices." 
The list to be published yearly in Keramic Studio and the 
"Apprentices" to be advanced yearly to "Craftsmen" and the 
"Craftsmen" to "Masters" as their work comes up to the neces- 
sary standard. No naturalistic work accepted, except on panels. 
When the membership is sufficiently large there are other mutual 
advantages that might accrue in the way of lectures, exhibi- 
tions — perhaps at the San Francisco Panama Exposition, etc., 
etc. We would be glad to hear from our good workers on the 
subject both as to their willingness to take part and as to any 
suggestions they might have. The guild should be self-sup- 
porting from percentage on sales. Anything that Keramic 
Studio can do to encourage our workers and advance the 
craft will be gladly undertaken without any pecuniary consider- 
ation. Let us hear from you all at an early date. 

STUDIO NOTES 

Miss Amy P. Dalrymple, artist and teacher for oils and 
water color painting and china decoration, has removed her 
studio from Boylston St., in Copley Square, to Trinity Court. 
See full address on teachers' page. 

Miss Minnie C. Taylor, of San Francisco, sails on Novem- 
ber 5th, for Europe, where she will remain for a year studying 
in London and later in Dresden and Vienna. 

Mrs. S. Evannah Price, a teacher of china decoration, has 
moved her New York studio to 208 W. 85th St., where she will 
resume the teaching of china painting and designs. 

Miss Jessie M. Bard will be at the Williamsport-Dick- 
inson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa., for the winter. 



136 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




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BORDERS— A, W. HECKMAN 

"^HESE borders may be applied to plates, cups and saucers, gold and rich blue or green on white, gold and red or gold 

bowls, etc. and may be carried out in two colors or and green on cream tint, gold and rich blue on pale green, soft 

gold or silver and a touch of bright color. blue and gi-een on white, soft yellow, yellow brown, dull pink 

Some good color combinations are gold and yellow on white, and gi-ey gi^een on white. 



T^ 



Ili:KAMIC STUDIO 



137 



BOWL (Page 138) 

Albert W. Heckman 

BOWL can be treated same as plate if desired to use as a 
set, if not oil dark in design and dust with Shading 
Green, one part; Pearl Grey, eight parts; Apple Green, one 
part; then fire. 

Second Fire — Oil entire bowl and dust with Ivory Glaze, 
five parts; Apple Green, one part. Design can also be carried 



out in two shades of gold and two tones of Yellow Brown 
Lustre. 

CUP AND SAUCER (Page 153) 

Albert W. Heckman 
''UP and saucer in Gold and Green. The leaf forms are 
Green and Gold the outline of flower and bands are 
Roman Gold; the little forget-me-nots are Yellow Green and a 
little Sea Green. 



c 




PLATE— A. W. HECKMAN 



OUTLINE design in India Ink then oil the entire design 
and dust with Banding Blue, three parts; Deep Blue 
Green, one pai't; Copenhagen Blue, one part; then fire. 



Second Fire—Oil band and dust with Deep Blue Green, 
one part; Ivory Glaze, six parts. Wipe white in design out 
carefully. 



138 



nERAMIC STUDIO 




TEA CADDY. 

Albert W. Hechnan 

OUTLINE design in India ink, then oil the dark design and 
dust with two parts Pearl Grey, one part Yellow Green, 
one part Violet No. 2, then fire. 

Second Fire — Oil entire surface of caddy and dust with 
Pearl Grey, five parts; Apple Green, one part. Then wipe out 
the center of flower forms and the white space in wide band. 

ANOTHER TREATMENT 

First fire cream tint. Then tint the band with Pearl 
Grey, the balance of background with Pearl Grey one-half, 
Yellow Brown one-half. Clean out design and center of 
flower form and edges of band. Put Capucine or Orange Red 
thinly, on the center spot and carry out balance of design in 
Gold, first carefully drying the color. 

MOUNTAIN ASH (Page 139) 

Albert W. Heckman 

FIRST Firing — Leaves are Moss Green and Lemon Yellow 
used thin for the lights in leaves; shading the leaves with 
Yellow Green and Brown Green, the darker leaves are painted 
in with Brown Green and Shading Green. The stems are 
Moss Green and Violet, the darkest touches are Brown Green 
and Blood Red. Berries are painted in with Yellow Red, 
Yellow Brown and Blood Red and Carnation. The background 
is Yellow Brown, Brown Green and Blood Red. 

Second Firing — Use same colors in leaves washing the 
Y''ellow Green very thin in lights; the shading is done by using 
color in washes and applying thin. The berries are kept bright 
in the lights and strengthened in shadows by using same colors 
as used in first firing. 



m 



"(StT- 



^ 




TEA CADDY AND BOWL— A. W. HECKMAN (Bowl treatment page 137) 



RERAMIC STUDIO J39 




MOUNTAIN ASH— A. W, HECKMAN 



140 



tVERAMIC STUDIO 



THIS design is to be 
carried out in gold ; 
the two squares in flow- 
ers form may be put in 
with bright colors. 




THIS design is best carried 
out in Green Gold on 
a band of Yellow Lustre, 
then fire. 

Second Fire — Paint entire 
sugar with Yellow Lustre 
applied thin. 



SUGAR 

FIRST Fire— Draw design in 
carefully, then put design 
in with Green Gold, then fire. 

Second Fire — Paint Yellow 
Luster in band and handles and 
over the flower form. 

This design can also be exe- 
cuted in a soft grey green with 
lighter tinting. The flower in 
brown, center not too strong in 
color. 




PLATE AND SUGAR BOWLS— A. W. HECKMAN 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



Ht 




DOUBLE AND TRIPLE COLUMBINE— PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



Usually seen in tones of Purple, Dark Blue, Plum, Old Rose, Lavender Pink, Lavender Blue and Whites. Sometimes self 

colored throughout, sometimes with white corolla. 



142 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



SNAP DRAGON (Supplement) 

Harriette B. Burt 
CJ KETCH design in carefully and outline with Black, then 
►^ wash in background with Yellow Brown and Grey for 
Flesh, then fire. 

Second Firing— Paint Red flowers with Blood red in 
bright lights and add a little Ruby Purple on shadow side, the 
yellowish red is Blood Red and Yellow Red, the white flowers 



are Lemon Yellow painted in with thin Yellow Brown and a 
little Violet No. 2. The stems are Moss Green and Shading 
Green and touches of Brown Green; then go over the back- 
ground with Yellow toward the top, shading with Violet, Yellow 
Brown and Brown Green. 

Third Firing — Use same coloring used in second firing 
leaving the lights clear and just washing a thin wash of color 
on shadow side. 




PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER— A. W. HECKMAN 



This design is to be carried out in Gold.; the oval shape dot is painted in with Yellow Green. Medallion on cup may be used 

for center of plate. 




SNAP DRAGO N — H AR RI ETTE B. BURT 



NOVEM BER 1912 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



143 




l- 




-L i^ 




COLUMBINE— V. SIMKINS 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard nttle Brown Green. The backgi'ound is Yellow Brown, Yel- 

OUTLINE design carefully with Grey for Flesh, then low Green and Shading Green, 
fire. Flowers are painted in with Yellow Brown and Third Firing — Wash a thin wash of Ruby over the blossoms 

Blood Red using color very thin. The stems are Blood Red on the shadow side, touch leaves up with Apple Green and 

and Violet. The leaves are Moss Green, Shading Green and a Moss Green, the stems with Yellow Brown. 



144 



REKAMIC STUDIO 





PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER— A. W. HECKMAN 



PAINT this cup in with Green Gold, leaving square flower for dinner plates. If carried out in blue dust the dark in design 

forms white. with one part Copenhagen Blue, three parts Banding Blue, two 

Second Firing — Paint Yellow Brown Lustre over the parts Copenhagen Grey, 
flower forms. Next Fire — Paint a clear Banding Blue over the white 

This plate design can be carried out in any color scheme, flower forms. 
The blue is usually preferred for breakfast plates, the gold 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



145 




MOUNTAIN LAUREL-^HARRIETTE B. BURT 



(Treatment page 146) 



146 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



CHERRIES (Page 147) 

Jeanne M . Stewart 

IT is important in painting cherries to keep them 
bright, crisp and transparent. Dresden Yellow, Red 
and Pompadour 23 will make the brightest tone, shaded 
to Pompadour with Stewart's Pompadour and a little 
Ruby Purple in darkest cherries in shadow. I^emon 
Yellow is used in lightest tones also a little Yellow Green 
in those cherries not ripe. 

The usual greens are used in the leaves with Yellow 
Brown, Chestnut Brown and Pompadour where an old 
withered effect is desired. The background may be 
kept in soft greys or greens, keeping it very dark at one 
side or under prominent portion of design. 

The lightest side should be padded off into a delicate 
ivory yellow so none of the white china is left. 

A few shadows thrown in last fire with a grey made 



of S. Pompadour and Banding Blue, padding some of 
the edges into the background, gives a pretty finish. 

MOUNTAIN LAUREL (Page 145) 

Harriette B. Burt 

FIRST Firing — Outline designs with Blood Red and a 
little Violet. Paint leaves in with Brown Green and 
Shading Green. The stems are Violet and Brown Green. 
The flowers are Rose very thin, shaded with Violet and Blood 
Red. The background is Blood Red and Grey for Flesh. 

Second Fire — Wash Rose over flowers and using Yellow 
with Rose toward center of flowers. The stems are Blood 
Red. Go over leaves again washing them with Yellow Green 
and Brown Green. Go over background again with Blood 
Red and Violet. 




CUP AND SAUCER— A W. HECKMAN 

First firing: oil design except the mushroom shape form. Dust this with Sea Green, one part; Deep Blue Green, two 

parts; Copenhagen Blue, one part. Then oil the mushroom shape form and dust with Apple Green, one 

part; Deep Blue Green, one part; Ivory Glaze, two parts. 



HlEramic studio 



147 




CHERRIES— JEANNE M. STEWART 



(Treatment page 146) 



148 



tlEKAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER— A. W. HECKMAN 

This design is to be painted in with Gold with a touch of color in center of the three oval forms, this can be painted in with Blue 
Green or Red. Medallion on cup may be used for center of plate. 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



149 




LONG SPURRED COLUMBINE— PHOTO BY WALTER'S. STILLMAN 

This variety comes in light shades of Yellow, Pink, Lavender, Blue and White, the large ends of the corolla usually 

being white or yellow. 



150 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER— A. W. HECKMAN 



PAINT rose form in with Peach Blossom and a little Yel- 
low Brown; the leaves are Yellow Brown and Yellow 
Green. The bands are Brown Green and Yellow Green. 

The plate can be carried out in two shades of gold with 
a little color in center of flowers. Paint the leaves in with 



Roman Gold and the roses with White Gold, then the centers 
with Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Red. 

This design may also be in soft grey pink with greenish 
or brownish grey leaves; lines in color or gold as preferred. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



m 




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1—1 

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P^ 
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1-1 

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152 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER— A. W. HECKMAN 

This design is to be carried out in silver or white gold; the diagonal form in flower is painted in with Banding Blue and 
Copenhagen Blue. The plate can be carried out in Copenhagen Blue dusted on or in gold. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



153 



KANSAS CITY EXHIBIT 

THE Kansas City Keramic Club held their sixteenth annual 
exhibition last spring. The Club as a whole has-been 
studying design during the past two years and this was evi- 
denced in the originality of most of the pieces exhibited. One 
of the features was a friendly competition in designs on bowls, 
from the tiny cabinet piece to the largest salad size. 

Mrs. J. Edward Barker exhibited a number of Satsuma 
pieces and all showed exquisite careful work. A large bowl in 
nuts was especially fine. Mrs. Alys Binney was happy in the 
choice of her design for a vase in blue and grey. A salad bowl 
was much admired. The etched dinner set of Mrs. Hanna 
Cuthbertson was one of the most elaborate and attractive 
pieces of the exhibit, while a chocolate set in dull blue made 
everyone desire to be the owner. Mrs. Edwards showed a 
charming variety of pieces, especially good was a tall vase in 
conventionalized hollyhocks. 

Mrs. Frederic Griffith's work was very dainty in color- 
ing and design, a creamer and sugar in silver and green being 
particularly attractive. Mrs. Pauline James' fern dish in 
gold and lustre was delightful and a chop tray in blue was 
very effective. On account of its simplicity, a tray in tiles 
and an ice-water pitcher to match, by Miss Carrie Mae Kings- 
bury, was very interesting to decorators. A tall landscape 
vase in brown and blue showed a beautiful blending of colors. 



Mrs. William McCamish showed some dainty work on candle- 
sticks, vase and small fernery. Mrs. J. N. Moore's dinner 
plates were very pleasing with a simple medallion, while a 
jardiniere etched in gold, silver and green was attractive in 
its harmony. Mrs. Nutter showed a number of bowls, candle- 
sticks in peacock-feather motif and a fernery in yellow and 
green. Mrs. Osborne was represented by a dainty bowl and 
vase. The bird vase of Miss Eva Ross was particularly attractive 
and a jardiniere in flat enamels showed a thorough knowledge 
and fine workmanship. Mrs. G. W. Smith was especially good 
in an etched coffee set and a dresser set in enamels and silver. 
Her work all showed the charming effect of simplicity in design. 
All of the pieces of Miss Jennie Somers were dainty and refined 
in treatment. Especially noticed was a small bowl in enamels. 
Mrs. W. T. Timlin showed a large vase in conventional apple- 
blossoms, a beautiful bowl in Japanese design and a number of 
pieces in enamels. In Mrs. Gertrude Todd's exhibit was noted 
careful thought in workmanship and design. A chocolate set 
in brown and gold was quite restful. The breakfast set in 
yellow and cream on a green wood tray by Mrs. Twyman was 
one of which one would never tire. 

Miss Harriet Ware exhibited a number of fine pieces in 
Satsuma. One of the best was a chowder bowl in lavender 
and green. The Club can feel that at the close of this their 
sixteenth year they are surely going ahead. 




CUP AND SAUCER— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment page 137) 



154 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




MISS WARD. MRS. W. T. TIMLIN. 

JMRS. TIMLIN. MRS TIMLIN. 

MISS WARD 



MRS. J. N. MOORE. 
MRS. GRIFFITH. 



MISS HARRIET WARD. 

KANSAS CITY CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT 



MRS. MOORE. MRS. FREDERIC GRIFFITH. 
MRS. MOORE. 

MRS. GRIFFITH. 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



155 




MRS. W. H. McCANISH. MRS. EVA J. EDWARDS. MRS. EDWARDS. 

MRS. EDWARDS. MRS. McCANISH. 

MRS. McCANISH. 



MISS JENNIE SOMERS. MRS. GERTRUDE TODD. MRS. TODD. 

MRS. TODD. MISS SOMERS. 

MISS SOMERS. MISS SOMERS. 



KANSAS CITY CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT 




EXHIBITED BY THE BURLINGAME CALIFORNIA CLASS OF MISS LOLA O. WILLITS 



The class is composed of the following ladies: Mrs. F. C. Bates, Mrs. E. C. Douglas, Miss Hazel Clifford, Miss Doris 

Robertson, Mrs. J. B. Gough, Mrs. D. B. Seger. 



156 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




HARRISON YELLOW ROSE—PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

LEAVES are Moss Green, Brown Green, Shading Green, 
the stems are Blood Red and Violet. The roses are 
Lemon Yellow, Albert Yellow, Yellow Brown and Carnation, 
the centers have touches of Auburn Brown. The background 
is Yellow Brown, Yellow Green and Brown Green. Second 
Firing — Go over the dark leaves with Yellow Green and 
Shading Green, the light leaves are Apple Green washed 
very thin. Shade the shadow side of roses with Yellow Brown 
and Brown Green with touches of Yellow Red in centers. 

SNOW BALL FLOWER (Page 151) 

Daisy Zug 

FIRST Firing — Sketch design in, then paint leaves with 
Moss Green, Shading Green light for the lighter side of 
leaves, using color heavier for the shadow side, adding a little 
Brown Green. 

The flowers are painted in delicately with Lemon Yellow 
and just a little Apple Green for the light side, shading shadow 
side with Apple Green and a little Violet No. 2. The stems are 
Shading Green and a little Black. The background is Violet, 
Apple Green and Copenhagen Blue. 



Second Fire — Use same color as first firing. Do not work 
over the lights; strengthen the shadow side and put touches of 
Lemon Yellow in blossom in the snow ball flower. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

D. S. — Drying oil should be used as it is and mixed in the colors. It can 
be used over the colors after they are dry but if it is to be used as a varnish 
it would be better to U£e French varnish. There are a gi'eat many different 
makes of oil and water colors that are good, among them Winsor & Newton's, 
Hatfield's, Rembrandt, etc. An adjustable desk would be best, otherwise 
get the slanted. Write to our advertisers. It is best to use easels so 3'ou 
may step away from your work occasionally. 

G. B. — Use one-third enamel and two-thirds relief white and you may add 
any color you wish to this mixture. The enamel is in powder form and should 
be mixed with a very little medium if there is not enough oil in the relief 
white. For the shell pink roses use Lemon Yellow and just a very little Blood 
Red and Rose. U.se it very thin for the light tone and heavier for the dark. 
The mat colors fire without a glaze. The colors are bought ready prepared 
and are dry dusted on. 

E. H. — We do not advise firing cla}' models in a Revelation or Perfection 
Overglaze Kiln. They are not built for clay work. You might try them 
for very low fire clays or for only baking the clay, not going much over cone 010 
but the higher you fire your overglaze kiln the quicker it will wear out. You 
must determine first at what temperature your clay is properly fired or baked 
and use the Seger cones which sell at one cent a piece. If you do regular clay 
work get a pottery kiln. 





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•TM El- F-^J R-EL- 


A_L- 1 v^e:-. • 



® 



r®" 



QONTRiBUTORS 



JESSIE M. BARD 
HARRIETTE B. BURT 
MARY L. BRIGHAM 
BURLEY EXHIBITION 
CRAFTSMAN GUILE 
CLARA L. CONNOR 
MRS. M. W, CAUDLE 
HELEN COOLIDGE 
WALTER K. FITZE 
KATE CLARK GREENE 
H. E. HANSCOM 
A. KREBS 
M. e, McCORMltK 
HENRIETTA B. PAIST 
L. H; RODMAN 
RUTH M, RUCK 
ALICE Bv SHARRARD 
A, W, SLOAN 
WALTER S. STILLMAN 



DEC. MGMXII Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF DECEMBER, J9J2 



Edftorial Notes 

Place Cards 

Lesson for Beginners in Enamels 

Blue Bells 

Pointsettia Plate 

Salad Bowl 

Salt and Pepper 

Border for Salad Bowl 

Cap and Saucer and Sugar Bowl 

Sugar Bowl 

Melon Bowl 

Delphinium 

Plate Border 

Barley Exhibition 

Chocolate Pot 

Child's Set 

Campanula or Chimney Befl Flower 

Tankard 

Celery Salts 

Salt and. Pepper 

Borders for Cups and Saucers 

Plate 

Medallions 

Monk's Hood 

Fruit Bowl 

Sandwich Tray 

Place and Menu Cards 

Plate 

Winter Green Berries (Supplement) 

Answer to Correspondents 



Alice B. Sharrard 

Jessie M, Bard 

Harriette B. Burt 

A. W. Sloan 

M. C. McCormick 

Kate Clark Greene 

M. C. McCormick 

Clara L. Connor 

Mrs. M. W. Caudle 

L. H. Rodman 

Photo by Walter S. Stillman 

Ruth M. Ruck 

Craftsman Guild 

Alice B. Sharrard 

Photo by Walter S. Stillman 

Henrietta B. Paist 

Alice B. Sharrard 

Ruth M. Ruck 

Helen Coolidge 

Walter Karl Fitze 

M. W. Caudle 

Harriette B. Burt 

Henrietta B, Paist 

A. Krebs 

Alice B. Sharrard 

Mary L. Brigham 

H. E. Hanscom 



Page 

157 
158 

158-160 
159 
J60 
161 
161 
161 
162 
163 
163 

164-165 
166 
166 
167 
168 
169 
J70 
171 
171 
171 
172 
172 
173 
174 
175 

176, 177 
J78 
178 
178 



THE OLD RELIABLE lElJai FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE JUM 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST Ln'TLE TO OPERATE 




•e 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 Size 14 x J2 in $30.00 ) / No. » Six* fO x 12 hu $15.00 

No. 3 Size t6 x 19 in 40.00 Gas Kiln 2 sizes Kiln 4 sizes. P^" 2 Sl« W x i2 in. 20.00 

' NaS Size 16x15 in. 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. I No. 4 Size W x 26 ixu SaOO 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



-y 



Vol. XIV. No. 8. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



December 19 12 




HE Christmas Competition received 
the largest contributions Keramic 
Studio has ever experienced and the 
average was surprisingly good. We 
had expected to use the prize designs 
for the Christmas issue but made the 
mistake of setting the closing date 
too late so that there was not time 
for the engi-avers to do justice to the 
work. We will have to give them 
later. The prizes were awarded as follows: 

Naturalistic study in color — first prize, J. Kallaus, Mil- 
waukee, Wis.; second prize, C. L. Wiard, Waukegan, Mich. 

Semi-naturalistic study in color — first prize, Jane P. 
Baker, Philadelphia.; second prize, Helen J. Hulme, Mt. Holly, 
N.J. 

Naturalistic study in black and white — first prize, Albert 
W. Heckman, Meadville, Pa. 

Semi-naturalistic study in black and white — first prize, 
Wm. G. Whitford, Maryland Institute, Baltimore. 

Bird design — first prize, Alice B. Sharrard, Louisville, Ky.; 
second prize, Florence R. Weisskopf, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Animal design — first prize, H. L. Bridwell, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Fish design — first prize, Ophelia Foley, Owensboro, Ky.; 
second prize, H. L. Bridwell, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Fruit design, first prize, Leah H. Rodman, New York City; 
second prize, Mrs. McElheney, Dallas, Texas. 

Nut design, first prize, May Hoelscher, Elgin, III; second 
prize, Grace Bruner, Kokomo, Ind. 

The first and second prizes both naturalistic and semi- 
naturalistic will be given as color supplements as will also the 
first and second prize, fish, fruit, nut and bird designs. They 
will be found to be unusually good in color and composition. 
We are so snowed under with good designs of all kinds that we 
have had to return many of merit and wonder how we can use 
all that we now have on hand and what we will have after the 
January competition is closed. We are looking forward to 
the latter competition with great interest. It ought to be of 
great value to our workers, showing what can be done in one 
fire. 

We have not heard from as many as we would like in re- 
gard to a "Keramic Guild" as mentioned in the October issue. 
Let us hear from all interested. 

We will give in the January issue illustrations of the cer- 
amic work at the annual exhibition of Arts and Crafts at the 
Art Institute, Chicago. We were unable to give it earlier as 
we are waiting for some of the illustrations. 

It will interest Keramic readers to know that the Arthur 
Heun prize for the best exhibit of craft work of original design 
in the Chicago exhibition was awarded to Mrs. Adelaide Alsop- 
Robineau, for her porcelains. This makes the fifth recognition 
of her work in one year and is duly appreciated. These five 
honors are as follows: First, Grand Prize, Turin; second, sixteen 
pieces accepted in the Exposition des Arts Decoratifs, Musee 



des Arts Decoratifs in the Louvre, Paris; third, fifteen pieces 
accepted at the Salon in the Grand Palais, Paris; fourth, (as 
a result of the Salon exhibit) invitation to become a member of 
the Union Internationale des Beaux Arts et des Lettres, among 
the names of whose members are Rodin, Anatole France, 
Troubetzkoy, Rudyard Kipling, Bernard, Roll, Gerome, 
Gabrielle d'Annunzio, Charpentier, Degas, Paul and Victor 
Margueritte, Monet, Raifaelli, Sorolla, Carriere, etc., etc., 
etc.; fifth, first recognition in her own country by the jury of 
the Art Institute, Chicago, in awarding the Albert Heun prize 
for crafts work. 

As recognition in America is the great reward for which 
she works and hopes, the editor feels in some ways more en- 
couraged by this last award than all the foreign honors. So 
will you all pardon her anxiety to let her ceramic friends know 
all about it through Keramic Studio? She feels toward the 
readers of Keramic Studio much as her little daughter does 
when she prints a new word or draws a new picture and comes 
running with "See what I did, Mamma!" 

The National Society of Craftsmen holds its usual annual 
exhibition this month in the galleries of the National Arts Club. 
As the New York Society of Keramic Arts is now incorporated 
with the first mentioned society we will endeavor to give our 
readers good illustration of the work shown by that society 
in the February issue of Keramic Studio. 

•5- 

Good things come slowly, so do not despair of some time 
seeing in Keramic Studio all the good things we have promised 
or hoped for on the editorial page. It is one thing to plan to 
have certain contributions and another thing to get them. 
"You can fetch a horse to water but you can not always make 
him drink." We have received many promises but our cer- 
amic workers are all such busy folks! Slow and sure! 

Our holly and mistletoe designs all came so late that we 
will have to save them for next Christmas. It was unfortun- 
ate that the editor made such a miscalculation in the date, 
hereafter we will endeavor rather to be ahead of time. But 
we, at least, are ahead in the matter of designs and color sup- 
plements, we have never before had so many and so different 
good things to oiler, as you will agree with us when you see 
the coming issues. It seems hardly possible that our ceramic 
designers could have made such forward strides in the last 
few years. 

The world of ceramic decorators will feel deeply the loss 
of Mrs. Thomas M. Fry, who passed away at her home "Meadow 
Cot" Southampton, Long Island, October 26, after many 
weeks of suffering. Her name has been a familiar and honored 
one among a host of friends and ceramic students. She was 
an indefatigable worker, always cheery and kind; however 
much they may miss her, all will feel that she has well earned 
her reward of rest and peace. The sympathy of the whole 
ceramic fraternity goes out to her husband, her son Howard 
and to her son Marshal Fry, whose name has been a talisman 
to hundreds of students of the higher ceramic decoration. 



158 



heramic studio 




PLACE CARD— ALICE B. SHARRARD 

LESSON FOR BEGINNERS IN ENAMELS 

Satsuma Jar 

Jessie M. Bard 

DIVIDE the jar into four equal parts, make a careful trac- 
ing of one section of the design and transfer it to the jar 
and go over the lines with a very light grey India ink line. 
Watch the study and make the necessary corrections in the 
drawing while outlining for the hand is not always steady when 
transferring. Paint in all of the tones 
corresponding to No. 4 in the grey scale 
with a thin wash of antique green bronze 
This is put up in small boxes the same 
as the gold and is thinned with Garden 
lavender oil just as the gold is treated. /' 

Be sure not to apply it heavily, two 
thin washes of it are much more satis- 
factory. Paint in tone three (which 
is the bands, leaves and stems) with 
green gold and it is ready to fire. Sat- 
suma requires a light fire about the 
same as Belleek. 

Second Fire — Outline the parts 
indicated with M. & H. outhning black 
thinned with lavender oil and go over 
all the gold then prepare the enamels as 
follows: 

Take four parts M. & H. relief 
white, which comes in a tube, one part 
Hancock's hard white enamel and a bit 
of flux. If the relief white is very oily 
put it on a piece of blotting paper until 
the oil%ad been absorbed. Place all of 
these ^'on' a clean piece 'of ground glass 
and grind thoroughly, with a glass muller 
at least ten minutes, then remove it to 
a china slant; take about a half of the 
mixture and add to it enough color to 
make a bright green, using Apple Green, 
and about half as much Yellow Green 
as you do of the Apple. Enamels fire a 
little brighter and stronger so allow for 
this in mixing. 



For the blue enamels use two parts ready prepared Fry's 
Cobalt Enamel and one part Banding Blue paint, add just 
painting medium to moisten the color but not enough to hold 
it together. Rub it through thoroughly, (it is not necessary 
to grind it as long as the light mixture) and add Garden lavender 
oil. Be sure the lavender is not old and oily. 

Take the remaining half of the white mixture and add a 
little Sea or Russian Green, enough to make a light blue or 
turquoise coloring. 

The dark blue enamel is to be in the tone marked No. 5; 
the light blue in tone No. 1, which is the wide light space in the 
large circle and the light part of the three next size circles. 
The green is in No. 2 or the long space under the large circle 
around the small outline circles where it is indicated. Use a 
No. 1 sable brush for the smaller spaces. Thin the enamel with 
Garden lavender to the consistency of thick cream, so that it 
will flow easily from the tip of the brush. Pick up as much of 
the enamel as the tip of the brush will hold, do not press the 
brush into it, but pick it up from the side, raising the brush up, 
keep the brush well pointed whfle doing this, then carry it 
to the china. It should be dragged from the brush, not pressed 
off, barely allowing the tip of the brush to touch, this causes it 
to flow on smoothly. If the enamel is painted on in strokes as 
is done with the color the enamel will have a rough surface. 
It should be perfectly smooth without showing any brush 
marks or joins. Avoid adding lavender oil as much as possible, 
for there is danger of getting it too oily. The enamels should 
dry within ten'or fifteen "minutes after they are put on, other- 
wise they are too oily and there is danger of blistering in the 
fire. It is best to thin just a little of the enamel at a time to 
prevent it from getting oily. 

When covering a large surface the enamel is made thinner, 





heramic studio 



159 




BLUE BELLS— HARRIETTE B. BURT 



(Treatment page 161) 



160 



KEKAMIC STUDIO 



work very quickly and work from one edge to the other to keep 
them all open, if you work from one edge until the starting point 
is reached it will become dry and show the joint but by working 
first at one end and then the other it will all be kept open. 

Enamels require the same fire as for rose color. They 



is due to underfire, they will often blister if overfired, though 
this is not always the cause of the fire as has been said previously, 
it is also due to being too oily. 

Any dark colored enamel may be obtained by mixing the 
powder colors until you obtain the desired color and then add 



should have a high glaze if fired properly; if they look dull it one-fifth relief white and thin with lavender oil. 




POINSETTIA PLATE— A. W. SLOAN 



PAINT group of leaves in center with a thin wash of Blood 
Red and a little Carnation. All other leaves and outer 
band Yellow Green and a little Violet. Dotted backgi'ound 
Gold. The dark background Yellow Brown and a little 



Auburn Brown. Second Fire — Outline with Shading Green 
and Grey for Flesh. A thin wash of Albert Yellow and 
Yellow Brown over backgi'ound in the center. 



RURAMIC STUDIO 



i6t 



MONKS HOOD (Page 1 73)— HARRIETTE B. BURT 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE design carefully with Copenhagen Blue then 
fire. Second Firing— Paint design in with Banding 
Blue and Violet for the light side, shading with Banding Blue 
and a little Ruby. The centers are Violet and Blood Red; 
the leaves are Moss Green and Shading Green. The back- 
ground is Yellow and Grey for Flesh and Copenhagen Blue. 
Third Fire — Use same colors used in second firing, strenth- 
ening the shadow sides and putting clear washes on light side. 

BLUE BELLS (Page 159) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE design in Grey for Flesh, then fire. Second 
Firing— Paint flowers with Deep Blue Green shading 
with Banding Blue and Violet. The stems are Brown Green 
and Violet; the foliage is Shading Green and Moss Green, 

Third Fire — Go over design with same colors used in first 
firing. 




SALAD BOWL (I size)— M. C. McCORMICK 

A LL oranges, pears, peaches and the pomegranate to right 
-^^ center, yellow, made of Silver yellow and a little Orange, 
toned with Deep Purple and Brown 4 or 17, using more enamel 
for the lighter shades. Seeds of Pompadour and Capucine Red 
equal parts. 

Grapes and lower center pomegranate made of Light 
Violet of Gold toned with Brown 4 or 17. Pomegranate on 
left of center Dark Blue toned with Brunswick Black and 
Deep Purple. All leaves Apple Green toned with Deep Purple 
and Brunswick Black. 

The tint is three tones of Satsuma, body of bowl lightest, 
background panels next, and bands the darkest tone. 





^ 




SALT AND PEPPER— KATE CLARK GREENE 

Gold with touch of color or enamel. 

DELPHINIUM (Page 165) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
'T^HE darker bunches are painted in with Banding Blue 
A and Violet No. 2. Leave centers white in first firing, 
in second firing shade centers with Lemon Yellow and Grey 
Flesh. The light lavender bunches are painted in with Deep 
Blue Green and Violet No. 2. The centers are Blood Red, 
Banding Blue and Violet No. 2. The leaves are Shading Green, 
Yellow Green and Violet No. 2. The stems are Browni Green 
and a little Violet. The background is Violet, Blood Red and 
Grey for Flesh. Use same colors for touching up the shadow 
side of bunches. 

DELPHINIUM (Page 164) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
A RRANGE these flowers for a tall cylinder shape vase or 
-^^ tall pitcher. Carefully sketch design in, then wash 
fight side of flowers with Deep Blue Green and a little Violet 
with touches of Roman Purple and Banding Blue in centers. 
The centers in the upper bunch have light center made of a 
thin wash Yellow, shaded with Grey for Flesh. The light 
bunches are a very delicate lavender blue; for this use Deep 
Blue Green and Violet are much more delicate. The centers 
are Roman Purple and Black. The leaves are Shading Green 
and Copenhagen Blue with touches of Grey for Flesh. 

Second Firing — Shade the shadow side of bunches with 
same color used in flowers, use a little Grey for Flesh with it. 
The background is Lemon Yellow and Grey for Flesh with 
touches of Violet. Use same colors for touching leaves used in 
first firing. 




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BORDER FOR SALAD BOWL— M. C. McCORMICK 



162 



nERAMlC STUDIO 




CUP AND SAUCER— CLARA L. CONNOR 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OIL the four petals of flower and dust with two parts Yel- Grey for Flesh, one-fourth Lemon Yellow, four parts Pearl 
low Brown, one part Albert Yellow and three parts Grey. 
Pearl Grey. Oil band and handle and dust with one part Stems and oval forms are Roman gold. 




SUGAR BOWL— CLARA L. CONNOR 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



Wide bands and handles Yellow Brown Lustre for first fire and Yellow Lustre over it in second fire. Outline and flower form 
painted with Black. This should be gone over m the second fire. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



163 




SUGAR BOWL— MRS. M. W. CAUDLE Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

All dark parts of design are Green Gold. The three large flowers are oiled and dusted with two parts Apple Green, one part 
Yellow Green. All small flowers are painted with Yellow Lustre. 




MELON BOWL (Leaves, Silver; Melon, Gold)— L. H. RODMAN 



164 



nURAMlC STUDIO 



')^ 




DELPHINIUM— PHOTO BY WALTER S. STJLLMAN 



(Treatment page 160) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



165 




DELPHINIUM— PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 



(Treatment page 160) 



166 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



5^^ 



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PLATE BORDER— RUTH M. RUCK 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THIS should be painted very delicately. Out- 
line is gold. Flowers painted with Rose, a 
very delicate pink at the edge and a little 
heavier toward center. Stems and leaves Apple 
Green and a little Violet. 



BURLEY EXHIBITION 

Photographs of the exhibition work are shewn in the Burley advertisement 
on page XV of this (December) number. 

THE annual exhibition given by Burley & Co. showed this 
year a few less pieces but of greater merit. Each year 
proves more emphatically the great value these exhibitions 
are to the workers in the various parts of the United States at a 
central point where the fruits of their industry can be attrac- 
tively displayed to the visiting pubUc and in friendly competi- 
tion for the several cash prizes that are awarded. 

Among so many, only a few can be mentioned within the 
space of a short article. We will first call attention to the 
prize winning pieces of conventional ornament. Both the 
clever designing and good execution on a Chocolate Pot by 
Miss Mabel Emery of Indianapolis, Ind., carried off the first 
prize. Her conventional lines in gold formed the pleasing 
ornament disposed on an odd blue top border with gi-een ac- 
cents, and a dull rose background which cut into a soft cream 
ground on the lower half of the pot. 

The second prize went to Mr. Otto Trepte on a Tea Set of 
three pieces. The comment of the Jury was, that it showed the 
best proportioned decoration in etched gold on white back- 
ground so far exhibited in Chicago. It has a firm, snappy 
handling of flowers and leaves well conventionailized. The 
handle and spout are treated in plain gold against the uncovered 
body of white china giving a pleasing contrast. 

The first Honorable Mention was given to Miss Etta M. 
Beede of Minneapolis, on a Chocolate Pot. The ornament and 
color scheme combined a tone of faded gi-een with gold bands, 
flower groups in metal colors attractively conventionalized. 
There was a specially clever spacing and coloring of the handle 
and spout. This piece was particularly noticeable for the 
good proportion in the decoration. 

Miss Marie S. Maddox, of Texas, displayed a Chop Plat- 
ter done in golden yellows and gi'eens, a dandelion leaf and bud 
pattern ingeniously worked out and delightful in general color- 
ing. This took the Second Honorable Mention. 

Mrs. J. W. Dixon of Kokomo, Ind., received the Third 
Honorable Mention for plates in resist style of ornament, a 
delicate one color decoration on white of seemingly simple 
forms rather suggestive of the Orient. 

The following are a few of the other conventional decora- 
tions. Mrs. A. P. Latham of Toledo showed a pretty bowl 
done without outline which is hazardous generally. Colors soft 
greens, border design with a strewn all-over pattern outside 
and a well divided broken band on the inside of the ring. 

Miss Gertrude Gilpin of Portland, Ind., had a tall pitcher, 
roses and stalks, graduated rosettes as an upper flower band 
with cream bands as a background; the scheme has much merit 
but rather too irregular and lacks firmness of outline. 



Miss Mary B. Cameron of Minneapolis, showed a bowl of 
pleasing ornament and well thought out in its divisions and color 
The ground is a soft green tone, leaves and stems in darker 
green, flowers in rose, double band of green and gold at the top, 
no thought has been given to the inside, this is a drawback — 
a rich all-over scheme of color on one side and a blank white 
on the other is a mistake — ^not a part of the interesting but un- 
written law of contrasts we all are working with. 

Miss Grace Gale of Evanston, 111., displayed plates of 
heavy, decisive borders, the designs and color scheme give 
promise for the future if she will give additional study to execu- 
tion. 

Mrs. A. M. Barothy of Chicago, showed a bowl and ladle, 
the design and coloring of the flowers are lovely, but a strong 
deep blue geometrical figure is too prominent, attracts the eye 
from the intended center of interest, with this detail in a light 
or neuti-al color the whole would be indeed charming. 

Miss Armenia Sampey of Newton, Iowa, showed several 
good pieces, soft color schemes, interesting and delicate designs. 

Mr. C. 0. Manspeaker, of Battle Creek, Mich., displayed 
in one place a fine color scheme in grey blues and gold of most 
ingenious design, we would suggest that with this talent he 
adds more accuracy in execution. 

Mrs. LeRoy T. Steward, of Chicago, showed a chop or 
fruit platter that is one of the richest in color and design ever 
produced by this talented atrist, it is a unique handling of the 
geometrical forms with white marguerites; as always, she marked 
it "not in competition." 

The following naturalistic work received prizes: 

The first prize was awarded to Mr. E. Chalinor, of Chicago, 
for a plate with a foreign landscape decoration in blue greys 
touched with delicate yellows and rose in the foregi'ound. 

Mrs. Heimerdinger's claret pitcher shows that she loved 
her piece and had deft fingers for executing her convictions; 
the decoration is a misty golden rod, rich, and novel in handling, 
it took the second prize. 

The first Honorable Mention was givei". lor a most inter- 
esting Tea Set to B. B. Carlson, of Chicago. 

Mrs. H. L. Freeman, of Chicago, displayed a set of fruit 
plates of sturdy design, gold ornaments holding in frame form 
various fruits all very rich in color contrasts to the white and 
shade ground. She was given the second Honroable Mention. 

The third Honorable Mention was awarded Mrs. L. Petrie, 
of Chicago, on her dainty realistic figure painting; she has been 
rewarded for her courage as this style of ornament does not 
appear to have been gi'eatly used for some time. 

A ship in full sail painted by Arthur Cummings, is a fine 
picture painted on china — not a decoration, as china decoration 
is now understood. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



167 




CHOCOLATE POT— CRAFTSMAN GUILD 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



CIRCLE, back of peacocks hard places on lid, handle and 
spot are Antique Green Bronze. Dark tones in peacocks 
and the band at top and bottom of pot are Green Gold. Wings 
Yellow Lustre. Remainder of peacock is Yellow Lustre for 
the lights and shaded into Yellow Brown Lustre. Light tone 



on Ud, bands and between peacocks, are oiled and dusted with 
one part Grey Yellow, one-half Yellow Brown, three parts Ivory 
Glaze. The remainder of the pot is oiled and dusted with two 
parts Pearl Grey, one part Grey for Flesh, one part Yellow 
Brown and one-half Meissen Brown, 



J68 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CHILD'S SET, FROGS— ALICE B. SHARRARD 

To be executed in blue and green on white. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



169 




CAMPANULA OR CHIMNEY BELL FLOWER— PHOTO BY W. S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 178) 



170 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




TANKARD— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



TANKARD, PEACOCK AND WISTARIA 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

TRACE and outline the entire design including the 
boundary line, with outlining Grey or Black 
(water mixture). Tint the entire piece with a tint 
made of Copenhagen Grey, three-fourths; Copenhagen 
Blue, one-eighth; Blue Violet, one-eighth. 

After firing lay the foreground with a wash of 
Grey Green, padding to make an even tone. Lay the 
flowers with Blue Violet, (or any Violet color not too 
red); the leaves with Grey Green and the stems with 
a hght tone of Wood Brown. The peacock must be 
kept down, not as brilliant as usually treated. Begin 
by laying most of Blue Green over the head and neck, 
not too strong, blend gradually into Moss Green and 
then to Grey Green for the tail. Clean out the center 
of feathers, laying in Deep Blue Green in the eyes and 
Moss Green in the area around the eyes. 

The stone lantern at the extreme right is laid with 
Neutral Grey. Fire again and go over the colors deep- 
ening some of the flowers and smoothing and flattening 
the colors of the peacock. The foreground must be a 
little lighter than the tail. Three firings should com- 
plete this piece which should have a general tone of grey. 

BORDERS (Page 171) 

Treatmeyit by Jessie M. Bard 

NO. 1 — Leaves and stems are oiled and dusted with 
two parts Grey for Flesh, one part Pearl Grey, 
one part Apple Green. Flowers oiled and dusted with 
two parts Peach Blossom, one-half part Blood Red, 
one part Pearl Grey. 

No. 2 — Leaves and stems oiled and dusted with 
two parts Pearl Grey, one-half part Grey for Flesh and 
just a little Lemon Yellow. Flowers oiled and dusted 
with one part Lemon Yellow and four parts Pearl Grey. 

No. 3 — Leaves and stems oiled and dusted with one 
part Moss Green and four parts Pearl Grey. Flowers 
outlined with same color and painted with two parts 
Albert Yellow and one part Yellow Brown. 

No. 4 — Petals of flowers and the two inside bands 
are oiled and dusted with two parts Banding Blue, 
one-half part Copenhagen Blue, two parts Pearl Grey. 
The dots and two outer bands are Roman gold. 

No. 5 — Outhne Meissen Brown and a little Yellow 
Brown. Leaves and stems, small square are oiled and 
dusted with two parts Moss Green, one-half part Grey 
for Flesh, four parts Pearl Grey. Flowers oiled and 
dusted with four parts Pearl Grey, one part Yellow 
Brown, one-fourth part Meissen Brown. Background 
a soft Ivory tint. 

«f ¥- 

CELERY SALTS (Page 171) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE designs in two tones may be carried out en- 
tirely in Green Gold or a little Light Green or 
Yeflow Lustre may be used. For the three tones use 
Green Gold for the dark tone, Apple Green and little 
Lemon Yellow for the grey tones and Yellow Lustre for 
the light. 



HERAMIC STUDIO 



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CELERY SALTS— ALICE B. SHARRARD 








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SALT AND PEPPER SHAKER— RUTH M. RUCK 

Treatment hy Jessie M. Bard 

IN the abstract design the grey lines are Green Gold out- 
lined with Black. The dark background is painted with a 
thin wash of Apple Green and little Yellow. Green or a thin 
wash of Yellow Brown Lustre. 

Flower motif: outline, Roman Gold; light background 
oiled and dusted with Pearl Grey and just a touch of Deep Blue 
Green; light part of flowers painted with Deep Blue Green and 
a little Sea Green. The dark parts are Banding Blue and little 
Copenhagen Blue. Leaves, caps of flowers and dark tint are 
painted with two parts Apple Green, one part Shading Green 
and a little Violet. 




l»ttiVAtiB®®«lfj|B®«®iim^®B< 



liilliilliil 

BORDERS FOR CUPS AND SAUCERS— COOLIDGE 



LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE 



172 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE— WALTER KARL FITZE 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OUTLINE, stamen and stems are black. Dark part of design and edge of plate may be oiled and dusted with Pearl 
flower Yellow Brown Lustre, the Ught turned over edges Grey and a little Lemon Yellow or the design may be moved 
are Yellow Lustre. Leaves, Roman Gold. Section between nearer the edge and it will not be necessary to have a tint. 




To be executed in blue and white or two tones To be executed in gold on white or lustre. 

MEDALLIONS FOR BONBONIERE OR TEA TILE— M. W. CAUDLE 



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Treatment 
page 161 



174 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




RERAMIC STUDIO 



175 



FRUIT BOWL 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

PINT the entire bowl with Satsuma, Neutral Yellow, or 
any deep old ivory. After firing trace on the design. 
Lay the leaves and stems with Grey Green. The apples with 



Apple Green. The blossom ends with Wood Brown. x\b- 
stract lines in unfluxed gold. After firing, go over thefgreen 
lightly to smooth the wash and flush on a little Deep [Red 
Brown over the lower portion of the [apples. Outline jwith 
unfluxed gold and go over all the gold lines. The inside of 
the bowl is tinted a lighter tone of the ivory. 




SANDWICH TRAY (Redaced)— A. KREBS 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



T ARGE light space in flowers, buds and all of the light 
-L/ spaces in center are oiled and dusted^ with three parts 
Copenhagen Grey, one part Pearl Grey, and one part Apple 
Green. Grey tones in flowers and center and narrow band at 
edge are oiled and dusted with two parts Sea Green, one part 
Banding Blue, two parts Pearl Grey. 



Leaves and all the grey tones are oiled and dusted with 
two parts Yellow Green, one part Violet, two parts Pearl 
Grey. Darkest tone is oiled and dusted with three parts Pearl 
Grey and one part Shading Green. 

Second &ce. Oil over entire surface of tray and dust 
with Pearl Grey and a little Deep Blue Green. 



176 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



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WEDDING PARTY— ALICE B. SHARRARD 




PLACE CARDS— ALICE B. SHARRARD 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



177 



j~yyn 








MENU CARDS— ALICE B. SHARRARD 



178 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CAMPANULA (Page 169) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

FLOWER white, shaded with a very little Violet and 
Lemon Yellow. Center, Yellow Brown; foliage, Apple 
Green and a little Shading Green for the light; Shading Green 
and a little Brown Green for shadow. Background a thin 
wash of Yellow Brown with a little Brown Green. 

"WINTERGREEN (Supplement) 

H. E. Hanscom 

BERRIES, Carnation and Yellow Red, 4-1, Stamens, 
Black; darker tones. Blood Red. Leaves, Moss Green 
and Grey for Flesh, 2-1. Reddish leaves. Grey Green and 
Blood Red, 4-1. Backs of leaves. Pearl Grey and Blood Red, 
4-1. Stems, Dark Brown and Blood Red, 3-1. Background, 
Shading Green and Pearl Grey, 1-4. Blossoms, shaded with 
Grey for Flesh and Apple Green, 4-1, and warmed with faint 
wash of Lemon Yellow in lights. 

TREATMENT BY JESSIE M. BARD 

FIRST Firing— Paint leaves with a little Moss Green and 
Shading Green for the light leaves; for the darker leaves 
add a little Brown Green; the reddish leaves are Yellow Brown 
and Blood Red ; the stems are Auburn Brown and a little Blood 
Red; the berries are Yellow Brown with a little Yellow Red on 
the light side. Blood Red and just a little Roman Piirple on 
shadow side. 

Second Firing — Outline carefully with Black and just a 
little Ruby added to the Black, then carefully paint a back- 
ground of Grey for Flesh and Yellow Brown. Then paint the 
leaves in again by using a thin wash of Apple Green in the lighter 
leaves and Brown Green on the darker leaves. The berries 
are washed with the Yellow Red applied thin and Blood Red 
on the shadow side. 

STUDIO NOTES 

Emily F. Peacock announces a special exhibition of antique 
jewelry and brasses and her own hand wrought jewelry, at 
578 Madison Avenue, between 56th and 5'7th Streets, New 



York City. Exhibition and sale November and December. 
Miss Sally S. Holt of New Orleans, La., has changed her 
address to 1434 Pleasant Street. In the fair held at Jackson, 
Miss Holt received three first premiums on her decorated china 
and one on her designs. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

M. W. — A punch bowl may be placed in any way in a kiln. If it is placed 
on the bottom of the kiln it would be best to put it on a stilt or something that, 
would prevent the base from heating too quickly. The best way is to stanfl 
it on edge against the side of the kiln. The base can be raised up by putting 
some square pieces of fire clay, which are used in the pottery kilns, under il, 
placing it almost perpendicularly and thus saving a good deal of room. 

One who has been greatly helped by the Sludio. — The cause for Mother 
of Pearl Lustre turning to a powder in the firing is that it has been applied 
too heav3r. 

A. W. — You will find full directions for dry dusting in the "Lesson for 
Beginners" by J. M. Bard, in the April, 1912, Keramic Studio. There is no 
stated length of time for the oil to dry, sometimes the oil is applied heavier 
than at other times and requires more time for drying and the condition of the 
weather also affects the drying. It is best to use the dauber en a large surface, 
it is almost impossible to get it even without. 

J. J. H. — -Yes, you can fire glass in a china kiln but it requires a vei-y 
much lighter fire, not much longer after you begin to see color, you cannot 
stack the glass on top of each other. A special gold is prepared for it. 

S. L. G. — -Dresden designs were used on china a number of years ago. 
The flowers are treated in a flat semi-conventional manner and usually arc 
very small and in garlands. The figures are colonial. You will probably 
find illustrations of the work in an encylopedia. It will be all right to decorate 
the traj' in pink and blue. 

W. W. N. — ^The following is a formula for grounding oil, three parts boiled 
linseed oil, six parts essence of turpentine, four parts asphaltum. Boil a 
half hour stirring constantly wth a stick upon the end of which is fastened a 
bag of litharge. It should be the consistency of .syrup. Care should be taken 
so the flame does not reach it and catch fire. Cork it up tightly anil set aside 
for use. 

F. D. W. — Sugar and water can be used for the outlining color, or the 
medium, which ever you prefer. Silver is quite satisfactory on china antl is 
used a great deal. A very satisfactory kind is that which is put up in small 
boxes the same as the gold, in some makes it is called white gold. 

H. E. A. — It would be best to take the lustre off if it can be done without 
interfering with the rest of the design. Lustre comes off very easily with the 
use of eraser for chma. The platinum pins should not affect the china as it 
takes a much greater heat than you can give the china, to affect them. 




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CONTRIBUTORS 



JESSIE M. BARD 
B. BENNETT 
JETTA EHLERS 
A. W, HECKMAN 
MRS. H. G; HUFFMAN 
ORILLAK MINER 
WALTER S. STILLMAN 
ELLA MIRIAM WOOD 
lONE WHEELER 



DEC 801912 ^: 



n nonTHLY n/iGflziNE for twi potter amddecor/mor- 



Theentirecontentsof thisMagazinearecovered by the general {x^jnght, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF JANUARY, 1913 



Editorial Notes 

Lanch Set (First Prize) 

Breakfast Set (First Prize) 

Dinner Set (First Prize) 

Chicago Ceramic Art CUsb Exhibit 

Golden Rod and Butterfly (Supplement) 

Iris, Lohengrin 

Iris, Pallida Dalmatica 

Iris, Mme. Ch.ztea.ti 

Iris, Jacquesiana 

Arts and Crafts Exhibition of the Chicago Art Institute 

Helpful Hints 

Aaswers to Correspondents 



A. W. Heckman 
Jetta Ehlers 

Ella Miriam Wood 

lone Wheeler 

From colored photograph by Walter S. Stillman 

Photo by Walter Stillman 

Photo by Walter Stillman 

Photo by Walter Stillman 

Photo by Walter Stillman 

B. Bennett 

Orilla E. Miner and Mrs. H. G. Huffman 



Page 

179 

180, 181, 182 

182, 183, 184 

185, 186, 187 

188-190 

190 

I9J 

192 

193 

194 

195-200 

199 

200 



THE OLD RELIABLE illEiIil FITCH KILNS 



The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 




THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST UTTLE TO OPERATE 




•e 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 

Glaze and Color Tone ^^^^jiS^" ®l#^^tf«* 

No. 2 Size tA x 12 fa 430.00 ) i No. I ^m* iO x t2 in. J%tSJ0O 

No. 3 Size J6 x 19 fa 40.00 Gas Kiln 2 sizes Kifa 4 sizes. P"" 2 Size 16 x J2 fa. 2a00 

_ ' No. 3 Size U X 15 in. 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 Size fS x 36 in. «0.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



^ 



Vol. XIV. No. 9. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



January I9I3 




E are presenting this month, in black 
and white, the three prize winning 
sets in the New Year's competition. 
We regret that the time is too limited 
to produce them in color as they were 
really charming. The first prize 
breakfast set by Miss Jetta Ehlers, 
of Newark, N. J., is exquisitely dainty 
with its lavender blue border broken 
with pink posies and is, perhaps, 
from the point of view of ease of execution in one fire, the best 
of the three, but the luncheon set of Albert Heckman, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., has a refined elegance when seen in the color 
scheme of green, silver and gold that makes it exceedingly 
attractive,'while the dinner set of Miss E. Miriam Wood, of New 
Orleans, is very restful with its wide sweep of pale sea green and 
occasional accent of pale rose. We have a number of other 
excellent designs purchased from contributors to the competi- 
tion which are not far behind the prizes and we shall give them 
in the near future. 



Believing it will be of interest to a large number of Ker- 
amir. Studio readers we quote below a few paragi'aphs from a 
recent letter of Marshal Fry in regard to the passing away of 
his mothei", whose name is a household word with hundreds of 
ceramic workers all over the United States. 

"I do not need to tell you what it means to me to be with- 
out my mother, as you know how inseparable we always have 
been. During my entire life my mother and I have been con- 
stant companions, scarcely ever being separated. During the 
last ten years we have been nearer together than ever, and as 
I have been getting older, I have more and more appreciated 
her, and realized how wonderful she was, and what a marvel- 
lous and precious thing her sympathy and love for me was. It 
is one of the things I have to comfort me now, that I really did 
in a large measure appreciate her, and she knew that I was 
absolutely devoted to her. I have very few regrets in that line. 

"Her gi'eatest ambition was for my success in painting. 
She felt that I had taught long enough, and that it was time 
that I had a chance to devote all my time to my own work, and 
so for two years I have had no classes, and have been painting, 
and have exhibited in the Academy every year for three or four 
years, having also had pictures in Philadelphia, Washington, 
and Pittsburgh. Her whole ambition was bound up in my 
making a success of painting, and she was so anxious for the 
last few years to get me fixed financially so that I would not 
have to agonize over money matters too much. To this end, 
we remodelled our beautiful old house at Southampton with 
reference to renting in the summer, the house being so at- 
tractive that it rents readily at a good price. My mother was 
deeply interested in this venture, and helped to foster it in 
every way, helped to plan it last winter, and helped me in 
furnishing it, in the Spring. Every bit of the house, every tree 
and shrub about the grounds is associated with my blessed 
mother, — her heart was there at Southampton, and our beauti- 
ful house we had helped to create, together, — we had planned 
it all together, and worked it all out together, planted the trees, 
many of them om'selves, everything reflects her blessed presence. 



"You can understand how thankful lam that our last few 
weeks together could have been spent in the beautiful house 
that w^e both loved so much. During the summer we lived in 
the little cottage which I bought, near my studio, but on 
October 1st we took possession of the beautiful big house, and 
the last weeks were spent so much more comfortably than 
would have been possible anywhere else, having steam heat, etc. 

"While mother wanted me to paint pictures rather than be 
engaged in any keramic work, she always had a great affection 
for the latter, and nothing gave her greater joy than to get out 
her lustres and experiment for interesting and unusual color 
combinations. When I gave up teaching keramic work 
mother had in stock many hundreds of dollars worth of white 
china, and she has been so attached to it that we have kept it 
all these years, intact. She has always hoped that I would be 
able to make use of it. One of the things she has been doing 
the last two or three years is to make a very large dinner set of 
beautiful plain shapes in china, and treating them with wide 
bands of gold. She was planning to have enough dozens of 
things so that they could be divided among Howard and myself 
and Charlie's children. She had nearly completed the set, a 
large number of pieces being finished ready to fire at the time 
of her death. The set was exceedingly handsome and dis- 
tinguished, all the pieces having been selected with great care 
as to form, etc. The completing of this set is one of the 
things I shall feel it a sacred privilege to do. 

"I am constantly receiving beautiful letters from friends 
all expressing so much love and affection for mother, such 
beautiful lettersl Have received so many letters from people 
who had only met her in a business way in the old days when 
we were teaching and doing firing, and everyone who knew her 
was impressed with her rare qualities, her gifts, her strong 
mentality, her courage and her sweetness. People who per- 
haps only met her a few times never forgot her, and some of 
the letters I have had tell of the wonderful impression mother 
made on them, how much comfort sheTwas to them at times 
when they needed comfort, etc. 

"It has been'one of the gi'eat comforts to'us to learn how 
much she meant to other people, how much she was admired 
and beloved." 

Two valuable new books on design have just come to the 
editorial table and we [would advise all students who can 
afford it, to add these to their equipment. They are books to 
keep always on the work table for reference. Both are fully and 
beautifully illustrated in black and white. 

"Theory and Practice of Teaching Art," by Arthur Dow, 
Columbia College. 

"Text Book of Design," by Charles Kelly, of University of 
Illinois and Wm. WouU, of Harvard College. 

We have received for the October competition designs by 
E. Senderling, M. Philhps and J. Slocomb, which we were 
unable to return to their authors because their address was not 
written on the designs and had been mislaid or lost in some 
way. We also had offers to make them for some designs we 
wish to keep. Will these three designers be kind enough to 
write to us ? 



180 



nE:RAMIC STUDIO 




LUNCH SET--A. W. HECKMAN 
First Prize in Lunch Set Competition 



THIS set may be executed in one firing by first sketching 
in the design with diluted India ink, use distilled water 
in diluting, and then tinting the background, after which the 
piece should be dried well in a hot oven previous to painting 
in the units and connecting lines. For the flower forms and 
upright center stems use two parts Yellow Brown, one part 
Copenhagen Grey with a touch of Sepia. The leaves and 
outer lines are two parts Olive Green and one part Copenhagen 
Grey. The centers of the flowers are a bright Yellow. For 
tinting the lighter part of the background use Lemon Yellow 
with a little Yellow Green and for the darker parts add Yellow 
Brown. The border on the bottom of the jar is to be used on 
the edge of the fid. 

This design is much more effective when done in several 
flrings, using Yellow and Yellow Brown lustre together with 



Gold, Green Gold and a touch of Bright Green color. For the 
first fire mark out the lines along the edge of the borders and 
paint in the lustre. The lighter tint is Yellow padded very 
thin and the darker values are Yellow Brown lustre. Tint the 
lid the same as the body of the jar and use the narrow border 
on the edge of the lid. For the second fire paint in the leaves 
and outer bands with Green Gold and the flower forms in 
Roman Gold. Paint in the centers of the flowers and center 
upright stems with Empire Green. Repeat this fire, burnish 
the gold and give the whole jar a wash of Yellow Brown lustre. 
The handle may be in gold or in Yellow Brown lustre ac- 
cording to the individual preference. If gold is used wash the 
lustre over it also as with the flower forms. For a simpler 
one-flre treatment execute in gold, silver and green or blue 
green and yellow brown on the white china. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



181 





PLATE AND CHOP PLATE FOR LUNCH SET— A. W. HECKMAN 
First Prize in Lunch Set Competition 



182 



MIRAMIC STUDIO 





PEPPER SHAKER^ALBERT W. 
HECKMAN 



LUNCH SET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
First Prize in Lanch Set Competition ^ 

BREAKFAST SET 

Jetta Ehlerfi 

IT IS necessary in doing things for one fire, to be particu- 
larly careful in the handling of the color. Only enough 
oil should be used to keep it pliable, the less the better. Use 
a small brush, a number four square shader is excellent. Lay 
the color as smoothly as possible, avoiding the use of a pad as 
one is apt to lose much of the life and snap of the work in pad- 
ding it. A very simple list of colors was used in this design. 
Dark Blue, Ruby Purple, Carmine No. 3 and Moss Green V, all 
Lacroix colors, chosen because the quality of the tube color is 
so especially adapted to this kind of work. The colors were 
mixed with a bit of painting medium. 

The band and basket are blue-lavender made with Dark 
Blue toned with Ruby Purple and used in rather a light tone. 
The flowers are painted with Carmine No. 3. The leaf shapes 
are Moss Green V, toned with a wee touch of Ruby Purple. 
After the bands are painted in, the outer edge is cleaned by 
means of a paint rag held over the thumb nail. 

The edges of all the pieces are left white. No outline is 
used, and the design is applied by means of tracing paper 
and graphite impression paper. 

Anyone possessed of a little ability in drawing can easily 
paint in the little florets freehand. The set can be done with 
little labor. It simply requires exactness in handling. 




BREAKFAST SET— JETTA EHLERS 
First Prize in Breakfast Set Competition 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



183 




184 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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RERAMIC STUDIO 



185 




DINNER SET— ELLA MIRIAM WOOD 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

TRACE in design and oil stems, leaves and 
handle of cup with Special Tinting Oil and dust 
with four parts Pearl Grey and one part Deep Blue 
Green. Oil between the two bands and dust with 
Pearl Grey and a touch of Deep Blue Green. Paint 
the flower with a thin wash of Rose using it a 
little heavier over the darker parts. Center of 
flower a thin wash of Yellow. 





FULL SIZE SECTION OF PLATE, AND CUP AND SAUCER, DINNER SET— ELLA MIRIAM WOOD 

First Prize in Dinner Set Competition 



186 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




RERAMIC STUDIO 



187 




DINNER SET— ELLA MIRIAM WOOD 
First Prize in Dinner Set Competition 



188 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




Ingle Gammon. 



M. Ellen Iglehart. 



Margaret Hammond. 



CHICAGO CERAMIC ART CLUB EXHIBIT 

lone L. Wheeler 

THE twentieth annual exhibition of the Chicago Ceramic 
Art Association opened October first to continue until 
the twenty-third. In the variety and individuality of work 
shown, this display is of particular interest, maintaining the 
reputation of the Club for strong and original work. Members 
realize the necessity of erecting designs influenced by their 
study of nature and of not depending upon historic ornament 
for their inspiration. 

For the most appropriate design for a dinner set the A. H. 
Abbott Prize was awarded to Miss Lillian Foster. The design 
is of small flowers in enamels, connected with bands of grey 
outlined in gold. The spacing and proportions in this set are 
most successfully planned. 

Miss Mary E. Hippie received the A. H. Abbott Prize for 
the best piece of work in enamels. This is presented upon a 
Satsuma Vase with strikingly original design. For its motif 
the author has utilized the daisy. This piece is a very welcome 
departure from the general use of enamels in very small flowers 
adapted from historic ornament. The artist has been success- 
ful in floating her enamels over much larger spaces than the 
average worker generally shows and the work is intensely inter- 
esting in the original style of handling. 

The F. B. Aulich Prize offered for lustre in design on an 
eight inch vase was presented to Mrs. Isabelle C. Kissinger. 
Nasturtiums in colored golds band the vase very effectively. 
The base of the vase is in yellowish green lustre. 

Mrs, lone L. Wheeler was awarded the Special Prize for 
the best group of lustre. 

Miss Marie Bohmann shows a teapot and tray in a strong 



and pleasing bleeding-heart design painted in tones of pink, 
green, brown and gold. 

From this studio too, come a dresser set, daintily done in 
bands of blue with pink flowers upon a ground of ivory tint, 
and a satsuma card plate with all-over design in pink and 
gi-een enamels with a background of a pleasing shade of tan. 

A sandwich tray and six plates executed by Miss Bessie 
Brower form a striking note in the exhibit. The motif used is 
the dwarf cedar, the colors are blue grey and rich reddish 
brown. 

Miss Anna Cornich shows a plate in tones of blue that 
would make a pleasing breakfast set. She also offers a vase in 
pale blue lustre. 

Miss Amanda Edwards sends a tray with a Japanese 
poppy motif, very strong in color and unusual in design, also 
a cup and saucer in a New Zealand design. 




Abbie Pope Walker. 



heramic studio 



J89 




lone Wheeler, awarded special prize for best lustre group 



Lillian Gunther, Marguerite J. Rood, Marie B. Bowman, M. Ellen Iglehart, 
Amanda Edwards 



Miss Ingle Gammon is represented by a unique tea set 
in gold and yellow and green lustre. Miss Margaret Hammond 
shows a dinner plate in a pleasing arrangement of small blue grey 
flower, and a satsuma teapot and tile in gold and red enamels, 
which shows admirable restraint in decoration. 

Strength and originality are shown in the work of Miss 
Mary Hippie. A cleverly arranged geometric ornament in 
rich tones of olive green, brown and gold on a satsuma tint 
background makes a most charming decoration for a chocolate 
set. A cup and saucer decorated with clusters of flowers, nar- 
row bands of gold and blue enamel, with the prize vase already 
mentioned, complete her exhibit. 

Miss M. Ellen Iglehart is represented by a very elaborate 
dresser set skillfully executed and the design is cleverly adapted 
to the various shapes. A pleasing effect of small flowers in the 
colonial coloring presents the soft, harmonious tints for which 
this artist is noted. As a dresser set is for constant use, the 
flat color is far more practical than the enamels. A particularly 
successful arrangement of fruit is displayed on a set of punch cups. 



Mrs. Isabelle C. Kissinger displays one of the most at- 
tractive pieces in the exhibition, a finely executed punch bowl 
with an elaborate design of bitter-sweet. The color is rich 
and harmonious and the structural lines used add greatly to 
the strength of the design. A set of monogram plates are 
well thought out, the monogram comprising part of the design 
and so not offensively thrust upon one's notice as is often the 
case. A blue and green enamel box is perfect in execution and 
color. A dresser set in tiny flowers thoughtfully arranged in 
a design which recognizes the value of the corners, and adapts 
nicely to all different shapes, is most attractive, and extremely 
dainty and fitting for any rooms in which it might be placed. 
Equally successful designs are shown upon salt and pepper 
shakers and three very attractive lustre bowls. 

Bertha Lockwood sends a lustre vase good in design and 
most attractive in color effect obtained with copper, gold 
and nasturtium lustre, also a compote in green lustre with 
grape design worked out in Roman and green golds and a 
charming dinner set in green and pink. 




Margaret • Hopple. 
Awarded the A. H* Abbott Prize for the best piece i 



. Enamels. 



Lillian M. Foster. 
Awarded the A. H. Abbot Prize for the Most Appropriate Design for Dinner Set. 



190 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




Bertha L. Locfcwood. Bessie S. Brower. Anna V. Cornish. 

Abbie Pope "Walker. Maud Meyers. 

Maud Meyer's offerings are all in dark coloring, making 
attractive spots among the more daintily colored pieces. She 
is represented by two vases in blue, a candlestick in black and 
silver, an incense jar in black and gold, and an effective satsuma 
vase in red and green enamels. 

Abbie Pope Walker sends a garden coffee set, quaint in 
design and colors of pale green, pink and gold. A very at- 
tractive salad bowl is in grey blue enamel with narrow gold 
bands. The effect of the basket of flowers in green, pink and 
black is pleasingly worked out upon a faience plate. A large 
bonbon with a geometric design in three colored golds and 
enamel jewels combined with green lustre is very successful. 
A landscape design in gold and silver outlined in paste is 
effectively carried out upon a very attractive fernery. Four 
pieces in pale gi'een lustre and a vase of lustre over gold, com- 
plete her exhibit. 

Marguerite Rood sends a beautiful vase decorated with a 
band of conventionalized nasturtium leaves and flowers in 
gold on a rich green lustre background. This is very success- 
ful both in design and color. 

GOLDEN-ROD AND BUTTERFLY (Supplement) 

Colored Photograph by Walter S. Stilhnan 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

FOR the tender light on flowers use a thin wash of Lemon 
Yellow and for the warmer light use Albert Yellow, 
for the shadows add Yellow Brown and for the dark- 
est tone add a little Brown Green. Stems and leaves, 
Apple Green and a little Violet for the lights, add a little Brown 
Green for the shadows and for the darkest tones use Shading 
Green and Brown Green. Background, Grey for Flesh and 
little Lemon Yellow for the light tone and Grey for Flesh and 
Violet for the darker. 

Butterfly, Albert Yellow for the light tone shaded with a 
little Yellow Brown, Banding Blue and Black for the lights on 
the darker tone and Black with a little Ruby for the shadow 
side. 

IRIS, MME. CHEREAU, WHITE WITH VIOLET FRILL 

Photo by "Walter S, Stillman (Page 193) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

CAREFULLY draw this design in, then paint a backgi'ound 
with Copenhagen Blue, Violet No. 2 and Grey for Flesh. 
Then paint flowers, the shado'ws, with Apple Green, A'^iolet and 
a bit of Grey for Flesh. The edges are marked with Violet. 
The stamen is Yellow Brown, very thin and a little Grey for 
Flesh. The stems have a little Blood Red and Violet. The 
leaves are Apple Green and Shading Green. 

Second Firing — Use same colors used in first firing. Over 



the flowers wash a very thin wash of Lemon Yellow. The 
shadows are gone over very delicately. 

IRIS PALLIDA DALMATICA, LAVENDER BLUE 

Photo by "Walter S. Stillman (Page 192) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

FIRST Firing — Flowers are painted in very delicately with 
Violet No. 2, just a little Deep Blue Green and shaded 
with Violet and Apple Green. The yellow in flower is Lemon 
Yellow; the calyx is Yellow Brown and Brown Green used 
very thin; the stems are Apple Green and Brown Green. 
Leaves are Shading Green and Yellow Green. 

Second Firing — Touch up the shadow side on flowers with 
Banding Blue and a little Grey for Flesh, then shade leaves 
with Yellow Green and Brown Green. Paint background 
with Blood Red and Violet delicately and Brown Green and 
Shading Green around flowers. 

IRIS— JACQUESIANA, STANDARDS, GREY CLARET, 
FALLS, CLARET 

Photo by "Walter S. Stillman (Page 194) 

Treatment by Mrs. K. E. Cherry 

FOR the lighter side of flowers use Deep Blue Green, Band- 
ing Blue and Violet No. 2; for the darker side use Band- 
ing Blue and Royal Purple; in the very deepest touches use 
a little Roman Purple and Banding Blue; the markings are 
Lemon YeUow; the striping is Blood Red and Violet; the 
leaves are washed in with Shading Green and Yellow Green, 
very light, then the darker tones are Shading Green and Copen- 
hagen Blue and a little Black; the buds are Deep Blue Green 
and Violet; the lower part of flowers end buds are made with 
a thin wash of Yellow Brown and Brown Green. 

Second Fire — Use the same colors as first firing in flowers 
using the colors very light on the lighter side; use same colors 
in leaves on shadow side. Wash a thin wash of Apple Green 
over the light side; wash background with Lemon Yellow, 
Yellow Brown, Grey for Flesh and Violet; the stems are Lemon 
Yellow, Y''ellow Green shaded with Yellow Green and Shad- 
ing Green. 

STUDIO NOTE 

Miss May E. Reynolds, Auditorium Bldg., Chicago, 111., 
has recently bought out the entire studio stock and goodwill of 
Miss May Armstrong and will hereafter occupy both studios. 




Isabelle C. Kissinger, awarded the^F, B. Aulich Prize for the best decorated 
Lastre Vase 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



m 



115 and 116. In this transfer she has acquired all of Miss 
Armstrong's water color studies for china in the conventional, 
semi-conventional, Japanese, etc. 

The Fine Arts Journal of Chicago writes of this young 
artist as follows : Miss Reynolds is a graduate of the Cincinnati 
Art Academy, a pupil of Duveneck, a member of the "Woman's 



Art Club" of that city, and for many years studied under 
Vincent DuMond, Walter Appleton Clark, and others as a 
member of the Art Students' League of New York. While a 
student of portraiting, exhibiting in the Cincinnati Art Museum, 
Miss Reynold's love of color and nature led her to paint china, 
in which she is wonderfully successful. 




IRIS. LOHENGRIN— PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



THESE flowers are an old rose color marked with darker 
streaks of lavender, with rich orange beard. Paint 
flowers, the three upper leaves, with Yellow Brown, Blood 
Red and a little Violet. The lower leaves are Violet and Copen ; 
hagen Blue. The markings are Royal Purple and Blood Red; 
the beard is Yellow Brown, Albert Yellow. The stamen is 



Yellow Brown and Violet. The stems are Blood Red and 
Violet. The leaves are Shading Green and Grey for Flesh. The 
background is Violet, Blood Red and Grey for Flesh. 

Second Firing — Use same color used in first firing. Do not 
go over the lights, just strengthen the shadow side. 



f92 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




IRIS PALLIDA DALMATICA, LAVENDER BLUE— PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 

(Treatment page 190) 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



193 




IRIS, HME. CHEREAU, WHITE WITH VIOLET FRILL— PHOTO BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 

(Treatment page 190) 



194 



IlERAMIC STUDIO 



Ui:-.'. ""XV. 




IRIS, JACQUESIANA, STANDARDS, GREY CLARET, FALLS, CLARET— PHOTO BY WALTER 

S. STILLMAN (Page 190) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



195 




INTERIOR GALLERY CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE— ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION 



CERAMICS AT THE ELEVENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 
OF ART CRAFTS OF THE CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 

B. Bennett 

IT is unfortunate that words cannot convey the subtlety 
or pecuUarities of color which are some of the prime 
qualities in pottery results. The enthusiastic admirer can 
but call attention to the ideas conveyed by the various potters 
thereby arousing sufficient public interest to create the desire 
first to see and examine, and then to possess. There are two 
necessities to consummate the desired result, the first to obtain 
novel, well wrought pieces to exhibit, the second to spare no 
pains in installing the work to be exhibited before the public 
eye. 

The Art Institute of Chicago is the only big museum in 
this country that so far recognizes the crafts in art that it holds 
annually an exhibition of work gathered from every part of the 
United States. The large galleries are decorated in novel 
manner each year, but the exhibition just closed certainly 
excelled all that have gone before. 

One illustration shows the general arrangement of one of 
the five picture galleries devoted to the crafts this season. On 
the walls, that were done in soft linen tones, with a deep green 
running stencil pattern, along edges of walls and cases, were 
flat cases containing small pieces of weaving and lace and 
embroideries. The floor cases, some large, some small, held 
all manner of objects such as silver, pottery, porcelain and 
carvings. 

The case containing the Robineau porcelains is shown with 
its special installation on a changeable tan marquisette over 




MRS. J. W. RICE AND MR. VOLKMAR, POTTERS 

DURANT KILNS POTTERY 



196 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




3SC- fcrj-,-ij Mammc, 
Ftilper Pottery 



Jr'iicher j-i--' bniiU Jrlowl lu 
Mary M. Hicks 



cream ground. This brought out the colors like jewels in the 
collection that has created the greatest ripple of international 
interest to potters and collectors since the invention and per- 
fection of Rookwood ware. 

Mrs. Robineau has devoted her time to what is perhaps 
the most difficult work in the ceramic field, the making of 



porcelain decorated with high fire colored glazes. The use of 
these glazes precludes all decoration by painting, the only pos- 
sible decoration being the modeling in some way of the designs 
in the dry paste, before firing. Of the very few processes at 
her disposal for this decoration of the body of a vase, Mrs. 
Robineau prefers one which has been very little used in the 
history of pottery, because it requires much time and infinite 
patience. It is technically called "excised decoration" and 
consists in tracing a design on the vase, and then scraping the 
background until the design stands out in relief. The tall 
vase with scarab design, the lantern and the vase with an all- 
over pattern of daisies and grotesque figures of Satyrs, are 
fine examples of this difficult work. For more simple pieces 
Mrs. Robineau uses beautiful mat, crystalline or flamm6 
glazes. One of our illustrations is of a charming little vase in 
pale blue crystalline glaze with carved white stopper. The 
tall, fusele vase, in the same illustration, in pale gi'een crystals, 
is a remarkable example of throwing and firing. 

The finest pieces from the Rookwood kilns dm"ing the 
year are collected and sent to be displayed: the soft grey 
blues and delicate browns in the landscape vases, the soft greys 
and whites and pinks of the smaller Japanesque mat glazes, 
the dream-like depth to the iris ware with its wonderful flowers 
white and sea-shell pin poppies on a ground suggestion of the 
dawn, rose sprays fairly sparkling with the morning dew. 
Such decorators as Sallie E. Coyne, Sara Sax, K. Shirayamadani, 
Edwards Diers, Leonore Asbury, Lorinda Epply and Charlie 
Schmidt, should go down to posterity as some of the art makers 
of the day. 




CASE OF ROOKWOOD POTTERY 



Hli:ramic studio 



197 




CASE OF ROBINEAU PORCELAINS 



The Durant Kilns, Mrs. J. D. Rice, and Mr. Volkmar, 
potters, have added novelty to the work by their display of 
pieces for table use in Persian feeling, white enamel glaze 
showing rose pink quality, in plates, serving dishes, candle- 
sticks and so on, and deep Persian blues, and lemon yellows 
in great and small vases. Italian influence is shown in some 
of the designs of this luxurious looking soft faience. 

A collection of vases by R. G. Cowan of Cleveland, Ohio, 
shows fine examples of drip glaze on stoneware, a most legiti- 
mate and artistic product. Two examples are shown here, 
one a vase in green grey drip glaze, the other a flaring vase in 
fawn grey drip. 

Frederick E. Walrath of Rochester, New York, displayed 
excellent^work, pottery expressed in still another vein, dull 
soft feeling mat glaze with colored inlays, in great variety of 
shapes. His designs have an elusive quality that is quite 
fascinating. We illustrate a tall green vase with rose design, 
and a mug from a sturdy cider set in browns and orange yel- 
lows. A bonbon dish in heavy grey, inlaid with orange trees 
in orange color, was quite surprising and very firmly wrought. 

The Fulper Pottery Company of Flemington, New Jersey, 
is working along lines that promise great things in the future. 
The forms as yet are rather heavy, but their lustrous flambe 
glazes are fine and attracted much professional interest. A 
rose bowl in delicate gi-een and black lustre found its way into 
the hands of a well known collector. A vase with handles 
brown flambe, was most subtle. The illustration shows a 
lamp base in cafe au lait flambe, the mirror-like sm'face re- 
flecting pools of light in its tawney sides. 

Mary M. Hicks of West Woodstock, Connecticut, is doing 



valiant work in trying to revive the legitimate use of lustre on 
a common pottery vase. We illustrate a pitcher in copper 
and orange lustre, and a low bowl in lemon, yellow and copper 
lustre. Her work is artistic though still a trifle uncertain in 
workmanship. 

It is true this year that the pottery workers far out- 
distanced the overglaze decorators, but some creditable work 




Vase and M«g, F, E. Walratb 



Vases, R. G. Cowan 



198 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. K. E. CHERRY AND PUPILS 
CHICAGO ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION 



was shown. Grace McDermott of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 
had a fine exhibit, a very large vase in enamel colors on 
satsuma body being of good draughting, design and execution, 
and giving some idea of the artist's favorite type of work. 

Mrs. K. E. Cherry and pupils sent an admirable display of 
overglazed work. The designs were handsome or quaint to suit 
the forms to be decorated , the colors spirited and varied. These 



workers have a style all their own that could not be improved 
upon. 

As it would be impossible to give every one a mention we 
will close with the Paul Revere Pottery products made by the 
Saturday Evening Girls of Boston. Not only young people 
but grownups enjoy the nursery rhymes illustrated in gay 
colors on tableware. 




MRS. K. E. CHERRY AND PUPILS 
CHICAGO ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



199 




Vase — Decorated Porcelain, Mrs. McDermott 
CHICAGO ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION 

HELPFUL HINTS 

I WOULD suggest the use of World's Fair tooth picks with 
cotton swab for cleaning out design in tinting. This is the 
longest round tooth pick I have found and is easier to use than 
a brush handle. I also find that it is better to have the cotton 
pad loose in the silk, so that the pad may be easily slipped to a 
new spot in the silk and also that I may pull off the wet outer 
layer of cotton from time to time. 

I like a Spencerian No. 1 pen for outlining much better 
than a croquill pen. The former gives more character to the 

line. Orilla E. Miner 

* * 

In using the Keramic gauge first rub the china over with 
the finger dipped in turpentine, and it will be found to write, 
but should it be placed where you cannot do this, dip the 
lead in the turpentine and wipe off any excess amount. I have 
found this very helpful in placing lines through or near an out- 
lined design. 

To make a perfectly straight line in places when it is not 
convenient to use the banding wheel, for instance, to make a 
line around the top of a cup, fill your pen with your outlining 
paint, moisten the tip of the third finger and place it on the 



edge of the cup and slide it along with the pen, hold the china 
firmly. A little practice will enable one to make a perfectly 

straight line. Mrs. H. G. Huffman 

* * 

HOW TO PREVENT CARBON ACCUMULATION IN A 
REVELATION OIL KILN. 

In regard to the accumulation of carbon in the combus- 
tion chamber of an oil kiln, will say that we have never tried 
zinc ourselves, but are told by people who are using it to put 
a small piece of it in the burner pan, which will prevent the 
carbon from clogging. However, I doubt if this will clear away 
carbon that has already formed. The cause of this trouble 
comes from insufficient chimney draught. 

We find that frequently in the summer season we have 
trouble, when kilns are attached to chimney flues which also 
accommodate other heating devices, and which are not in 
operation in the summer, and we have found that a dead heat- 
ing furnace or stove is pretty sure death to a china kiln when 
it is connected to the same flue, and when the heating appara- 
tus is not being used in the summer it should be tightly 
dampered off, so as to give the kiln a chance. If your kiln is 
stopped so that you cannot start it, the best way is to dig out 
the cement in the seams of the bottom plate, and raise the 
plate, and, from that point, you can get at the combustion 
chamber, and clean all the carbon away. You might run a 
stiff copper wire up some of the tubes. This should have a 
rag fastened to the end of it, so as to clean the tubes out thor- 
oughly. All it requires is enough tubes open to be able to 
start your fire. Then, in starting the fire, take great care not 
to feed too much oil on the start. Work it up very gradually, 




Poppy Vase — Lenore Asbury, Rook wood Pottery, 
CHICAGO ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION 



200 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



taking perhaps two hours to fire it or more, and, after you have 
given it a good hot fire once, you will consume all the carbon, 
and then, after that, you may not have any more trouble, if 
you do not feed the oil too fast, and have the heating stove or 
whatever it may be, dampered off when not in use. When 
there is fire in your heating stove it does not cause as much 
trouble as when it is dead. 

If you find the carbon collecting, and the burner smoking 
during the firing, turn the oil down to a rapid drop, and take 
the plug out of the front of the kiln, allowing a rush of air to 
go into the combustion chamber, and, in a few minutes, it will 
clear up, and you can go on with the firing. If you have an 
unobstructed flue for the exclusive use of your kiln, in a good, 
high chimney in your house, you will never have any diffi- 
culty such as you write about. The kiln is a natural draught 
kiln, and requires a good, unobstructed draught to make it a 
success. 





PORCELAINS— ADELAroE ALSOP ROBINEAU 

(Illustrations of the Scarab vase, the Lantern and the Daisy vase will be found in 

August, J9II, Keramic Studio.) 

CHICAGO ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION 



VASE, LANDSCAPE DECORATION— ROOKWOOD POTTERY 
CHICAGO ARTS AND CRAFTS EXHIBITION 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

C. G. E. — Mother of Pearl lustre should be flowed on very heavily. 
The cause of its firing out is probably due to its not having been ap- 
plied heavy enough. An over fire may also cause it. 

A. M. T. — If the kiln used had an iron fire pot the cause of your 
rose discoloring is probably due to dampness in the kiln. If rose is 
underfired it is a bricky color and the color remains on the surface of 
the china. The cause of the gold rubbing off was probably due to being 
underfired. 

M. B. W. — ^A punch bowl may be placed on the bottom of the kiln 
with a stilt under it or something to raise it sUghtly or may be placed 
against the side by standing it on edge and placing a fire clay shelf support 
or something of that kind under the base to keep it from shpping. Fire 
very slowly at first until color is seen in the kiln. 

M. A. K. — For enamels use four parts Relief White, one part Hard 
White Enamel and a bit of flux and add color desired for the light 
enamels. Use a bone knife for mixing, grind thoroughly. Use the 
tube Relief White, add a very httle lavender oil before giinding and 
then thin to the proper consistency with lavender as you use it. Enamels 
should not be affected by lustres in the kiln, probably something you 
used in mixing was not thoroughly clean. 



.,,Ji/:^^ 



K-E-E-T=> I^M 



F^l R_l 



/\_L- 




Theentirecontentsof thisMagazineare coTered by the general c opyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF FEBRUARY, I9J3 



Page 



Editorial Notes 

Cover for Round Box 

Chrysanthemom 

Enameling 

Salpaglossis 

Tobacco Thermidor 

Hollyhock Vase and Bowl 

Candlestick 

Gladioli 

Plate 

Gladioli 

Hat Pin Holder 

Borders 

Borders 

Rose Border 

Vase 

Jelly Plate 

Bachelor's Button 

Plate 

Phlox 

Plate 

Gladioli (Supplement) 

Helpful Hints 

Full Section of Plate 

Answers to Correspondents 





201-202 


Margaret Latham 


202 


Photo by Walter S. Stillman 


203 


Dorothea Warren O'Hara 


204-208 


Photo by Walter S. Stillman 


209 


Hallie Day 


210 


Henrietta B. Paist 


211 


The Craftsman Guild 


212 


Photo by Walter S. Stillman 


213 


Winifred Gettemy 


214 


Harriette B. Burt 


215 


Winifred Gettemy 


216 


Chas> Babcock 


2J6 


Clara Conner and Ruth M. Ruck 


216 


Katharine Soderberg 


216 


Mrs. G. R. Monro 


217 


M. C. McCormick 


218 


Photo by Walter S. Stillman 


219 


lone Wheeler 


220 


Photo by Walter S. Stillman 


22J 


Mary L. Brigham 


222 


Joseph Kallaus 


222 


Mrs. Earl Ramsey and Florence Huntington 


222-223 


L. R. Lightner 


223 




223 



THE OLD RELIABLE iOEllii FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




The only fuels which give perfect results in 

Glaze and Color Tone ' ^^^^s^"^^***^^**** 

No. 2 SizeJ4xl2 1n $30.00) /No. I Sl«« «0 x 12 to. $J5.00 

No. 3 Size 16 X 19 to 40.00 ( Gas Kiln 2 sizes Kiln 4 sizes, ^o. 2 Sl«, 16 x 12 in. 2a00 

No, S Size 16 X J5 in. 26.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 size W x 26 to. 60.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



VoL XIV. No. 10. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



Febrttary 1 91 3 




HE exhibit of decorated porcelains 
by members of the New York 
Society of Keramic Arts, in Decem- 
ber at the Galleries of the National 
Arts Society, New York, was very 
small and with a few exceptions of 
little interest. It is to be feared 
that the absorption of that society 
into the National Society of Crafts- 
men has had the effect of dampen- 
ing the ardor of the real workers and destroying the morale of 
the whole society. It would seem that the social side of club 
life has taken hold to the detriment of original production. 
The only exhibits of any importance were a collection of 
decorated pieces by Mrs. K. E. Cherry, of St. Louis, whose 
beautiful design and execution we have illustrated so many 
times and especially in the account of the Art Institute 
exhibit in the January issue of Keramic Studio, the work of 
Mrs. Dorothea Warren O'Hara which we illustrate in this issue, 
and some quaint and truly harmonious tableware by Miss 
Voorhees of New Brunswick, N. J., which we hope to 
illustrate in a coming issue. A few scattered pieces by other 
decorators were good but nothing notable. The whole exhibit 
was contained in an alcove about eight feet square. There was 
beside this, however, quite a large exhibit of Marblehead pottery 
with some new and very attractive effects in plaques suitable 
for wall decoration or fruit sets. One especially harmonious, 
had a design of a cock with flowers and fruit, centerpiece and 
border effect, the ground a dull orange, the design in various 
colored glazes, blue, green, red, etc., all with the effect of hav- 
ing an envelope of the same dull orange color. The control 
of the glazes shown in the cleai'ness and minuteness of the 
drawing in this and other examples is really an achievement 
worthy of remark. There is, however, the danger that with 
such skill in juxtaposing the colors the tendency will be to 
too much minuteness of drawing and detail which is not appro- 
priate to the medium. 

A small panel of castle and landscape in a fired mosaic of 
colored clays by Miss Alexander, was a new departure and 
opens up some interesting possibilities. There was a quantity 
of other low fire pottery work but not of great interest except- 
ing, perhaps, some bowls from the "Bowl Shops" with simple or 
child-like designs, not so much of interest from a keramic stand- 
point, as from their educational value. We understand that this 
work is done by poor girls as a sort of club amusement and 
instruction — as such it commands attention. 

An idea has been gi'adually forcing itself on our attention 
and late events confirm the idea. It is that ceramic workers 
do not realize at all the proper value of combination in club 
work. As soon as a club is formed, instead of searching out the 
advantages together, a struggle is immediately begun for 
supremacy in the matter of office holding or social position and 
the club soon degenerates into a game of follow-the-leader until 
it is led to extinction. This is not intended to be personal but 
is the case with nearly every club we have ever known even 
those that start originally with the idea of self -improvement. 

If we were to be asked — first, "What are the advantages 
of a ceramic club?" — second, "How would you organize it to 



gain these advantages?" we would answer somewhat as fol- 
lows: The advantages of a ceramic club should be, — 1. Fin- 
ancial; 2. Educational; 3. Social. 

We put first the financial question since bread is the staff 
of life and comes before cake. Each china decorator, however 
limited in knowledge, has a certain clientele and earns something 
in the way of pin money. If her circle of acquaintances were 
larger she would earn more. Alone, she cannot get together 
enough pieces to make an exhibit of importance which would 
draw a crowd; if she combines with the other decorators in her 
town, together they may be able to hold an exhibit and sale 
that would be profitable all around and teach the public where 
they can find small objects in porcelain at moderate prices and 
larger ones in proportion. In this way each one enlarges her 
circle. Here some will object that those that do the better 
work will draw trade away from the others, or that the one who 
does cheap and tawdry things will overpower those who do 
refined aesthetic work. No, there is a certain public for each 
sort of work. What the club members have to keep in mind 
is that it does not pay to run down any one's work to another 
person. They will think jealousy is the actuating cause. If 
each one makes a practice of calling attention to the good points 
in another's work, her listener will naturally conclude that she 
can afford to be generous because of her own superexcellence. 
This is simply good business pohcy. 

Supposing now that A, B, C, D, E, F and G have decided 
to form a club for mutual advantage. They will decide first 
that they will avoid any clash of personal interests by giving 
office alphabetically and in rotation. Each one will then strive 
to show that she is equal to any one in gaining advantages for 
the club so that her administration will be referred to in the 
future as "That year we had such a successful exhibit at Smith's 
store, etc." So then A is appointed president, B vice-president, 
C secretary, D treasurer, E, F, G committee for jury work. 
Next year B is president, C vice-president, etc, etc., which 
makes F, G, and A jury. Now then the decision is to have a 
Christmas exhibition and sale each year about the first of 
December. If the work is really worth while, some merchant 
in the center of the city can be induced to make room for the 
exhibit on account of the extra crowd brought to his store — 
a jeweler, crockery or art store or even a furniture store would 
be a good place. Possibly some member may have influence 
with the manager of a first class hotel. But the main thing is 
to get as good a place as possible costing as little as possible. 
The mistake so many clubs make is to hire some expensive 
room so that the profits are eaten up in expenses. This is 
where the "society bee" gets into the club bonnet and makes 
much buzzing for comfort and profit. Having settled on a 
place for exhibition, the decision is made to draw, say ten per 
cent, of the sale price of each piece toward expenses; if expenses 
are greater fifteen per cent, or even twenty per cent, can be 
taken. If the expenses are less the surplus goes into the 
treasury for future needs of the club. Having selected a place 
where a window can be used for display if possible, get your 
social directory and send out announcements and have a few 
prominent advertisements in the local paper. Then divide your 
china into two distinct sections, the exhibition and the sales. 
The exhibit should be small and choice showing the best effort 



202 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



for the year of each member and should be unhmited in price. 
This should be an educational feature: Perhaps it might be 
well to limit each exhibitor to — say three pieces. For the 
sales feature a limit in price should be made — say no piece over 
$5.00 or $10.00. It is better to sell many things cheaply and 
have your friends and public say, "Let us wait for the ceramic 
exhibit before purchasing our presents, they always have such 
a variety and so reasonable in price." It would be a good 
idea if the members should settle beforehand what sort of 
things to decorate so as to have a good selection: things suit- 
able for whist or euchre prizes and for the table or toilet, etc., 
etc. Then if plates and cups and saucers are shown, it is not 
necessary to make more than one with a card saying orders 
taken for the dozen at such a price. So much for the financial 
side though much more could be said to advantage and many 
clever ideas can be suggested by different members — such, for 
instance, as serving lunches during conventions, etc., having 
the tables furnished with china decorated by members and a 
sign on every table saying everything for sale from the salt 
and pepper to the teapot. 

For the educational features: The club should agree on a 
certain yearly fee and when a sufficient surplus has accumulated 
the first thought should be to pay the best teacher within reach 
to give an afternoon once a month for criticism and instruction. 
At these meetings problems can be given which will bear on 
the annual sale and so be beneficial in both ways. For instance, 
the members can each work out their problem one time on a 
pepper and salt, another time on a candlestick, etc., etc. 
Then at this meeting or at a bi-weekly one, members can 
bring pieces or designs for discussion and criticism by the 
others. Many other ways of helping one another will 
suggest themselves from time to time. But the main thing to 



keep in mind is that it pays to give all the information and 
help you can to the other members— don't be afraid that the 
advantage will all be on the other side even if you do not get 
a good idea in exchange for yours, you will have made your 
own ideas clearer to yourself, and have opened a door for 
more ideas to follow. Do not forget that there is no truer 
word than "that it is more blessed to give than to receive." 
As for the social side, don't try to climb dizzy heights. 
Seek only good fellowship, love and charity, and let the other 
things take care of themselves, don't waste your time or 
energy, your nerves or anything else, trying to scale heights 
which after all may only be depths inverted in a mirror of self 
delusion. In clubs, in art or ceramics, as in religious life, the 
truth of this saying holds good, "Seek first the kingdom of 
good and all other things (worth while) will be added unto 
you." 

The Keramic Society of Greater New York will hold its 
first annual exhibition in the Sun Parlors of the Waldorf- 
Astoria Hotel, from February 17 to 22 inclusive. The work 
shown will be table china exclusively, full services, and in- 
dividual pieces. 

In the account of the Chicago Ceramic Association ex- 
hibit, in February number, a mistake was made. The prize 
won by Miss Lillian Foster was wi^ongly credited to A. H. 
Abbott & Co. It should read: Lillian M. Foster, awarded the 
Burley and Company Prize for the most appropriate design 
for dinner set. 

The mention of Miss Lillian Gunther's excellent work in 
that exhibition was also omitted by mistake. 




COVER FOR ROUND BOX— MARGARET LATHAM 



Bottom of box and background of cover, pale gi'ey, using Pearl Grey and a little Yellow. Design darker grey adding 
Grey for Flesh to the light color, outlines darker still. On last fire dust with Pearl Grey all over surface. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



203 




' '-m^ ^ 




CHRYSANTHEMUM— PHOTO. BY WALTER S. STILLMAN Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



PAINT the light side of flowers with a wash of Lemon 
Yellow, then add Y^ellow Brown and little Albert Yel- 
low for Shading on the shadow side. Wash the dark with Yel- 
low Brown and a little Brown Green, then in the deepest 
shadows touch in a little Blood Red. The leaves are Moss 
Green and Yellow Green and shading with Brown Green and 



Shading Green. The background is Yellow Brown and Brown 
Green with a little Violet and Brown Green around the flowers. 
Second Firing — Use same colors used in first firing, shading 
the shadow side with a thin wash of Yellow Brown. Keep the 
lights clear Y^'ellow, then darken the leaves around the flowers 
using a little Brown Green and Shading Green. 



204 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




^ ENAMELING BY DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

AMONG the ceramic decorators who are coming rapidly 
to the front is Dorothea Warren O'Hara of New York, 
who is known mostly by her successful work in enamels. We 
are glad to be able to show our readers the accompanying 
photographs of her work and studio and quote a few lines from 
her "Art of Enameling" which has just come from the pub- 
lisher. The photgraphs of her work are also from this book. 

"The secret of good enamel work is to choose an enamel 
which suits your glaze. Soft enamels belong to soft glaze 
wares such as Satsuma, Belleek, English and Soft German 
china, etc., and may be raised in relief as high as desired with 
the feeling of true appropriateness if used on ware with which 
they agree. 

"They may be floated in high relief in one fire if the 
technique has been mastered, otherwise a second application 
will be better, this is especially true of large backgi-ounds and 
big flower designs. Sometimes as many as four applications 
are made. 

"As soft enamels on soft glazes may be fired a number of 
times there is no reason for turning out a bad piece of work — 
if untidy it can be cleaned up and brought out by re-outlining. 

"If your color harmony has been lost or your design does 
not hold together, an envelope of color will serve to fix up the 
w^ork. Some lovely effects are produced in this way. 

"Warm grey, Satsuma tint, yellow grey, grey green or 
any neutral color is good for this purpose. Soft enamels may 
be shaded with color. It should however, be done sparingly. 
Fine effects are obtained by floating one color over another 
and firing hard enough to bring the under color up. 

"Soft enamels on soft glazes are le^s difficult to handle 
than hard enamels on hard glazes such as the French and 
German china. The latter should be applied thinly to pro- 
duce a liquid transparent effect. This is especially more 
appropriate for tableware. Enamels on hard glazes will not 
always stand repeated firings." 

Mrs. O'Hara's book is full of information and designs 
with treatment and should be of great value in the studio. 



STUDIO OF DOROTHEA WARREN OHARA, NEW YORK 




STUDIO BUILDING 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



205 




SOFT GLAZE JAPANESE BOWL 

LARGE flower, background of panels, 
and background of inside band, 
done in Dark Blue Enamel. Flower in 
panels and inside band, as well as center 
and rim of large flower, done in Pink 
Enamel. Laves, Green Enamel. 

CRACKER JAR 

THIS jar is from Lenox Incorporated, 
Trenton, N. J. Decoration, five 
panels, with bell shape flower in pot. 
Colorings, Brown, Green and Lavender. 
Outlining and scribble done in Dark 
Brown color. Second fire a light tint of 
Dark Brown color was put over scribble. 
Flower pot. Brown Enamel. Leaves, 
Green Enamel. Flowers, Lavender 

Enamel and Dull Violet Enamel. 



SOFT GLAZE JAPANESE BOWL 




SMALL FRENCH CHINA FERN DISH 

DECORATION, Flower in pot, flat Enamels. 
Flower pots, narrow panels and tendrils, done in 
Royal Blue color and Turkish Blue color mixed in 
equal parts, with one-fifth Waterloo Glaze added. 
Flowers, Dark Yellow color, four parts, and one part 
Soft Yellow Glaze mixed. Leaves, Yellow Green 
color, four parts, and one part Blue Glaze. 




CRACKER JAR 



ENAMEL WORK OF DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 



206 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





BELLEEK PITCHER 



BELLEEK VASE 





GERMAN CHINA TOBACCO JAR SATSUMA CRACKER JAR 

ENAMEL WORK OF DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 



PLERAMIC STUDIO 



207 




FRENCH CHINA FERN DISH 



BELLEEK PITCHER 

THIS pitcher is from New Jersey China Pottery 
Co. (Willett's) of Trenton, New Jersey, 
after original drawing by Mrs. Dorothea Warren 
O'Hara. Decoration, Six hanging baskets of fruit 
and leaves. Baskets, bands and panels done in 
Brown Enamel. Panels at top and bottom, also 
handles, tinted with Satsuma color. Leaves, Blue 
Green Enamel. Pineapple, Persian Red. Large 
dark apples. Dark Yellow Enamel. Large light 
apples, Light Yellow Enamel. Small dark apples, 
Rhodian Red. Pears, Dull Yellow Enamel. 

BELLEEK VASE 

THIS vase is frorh the New Jersey Pottery Co. 
(Willett's), of Trenton, N. J., after original 
drawing by Mrs. Dorothea Warren O'Hara. Decora- 
tion, Five hanging baskets of fruit and leaves, with 
small sprig design in panels. Leaves, Green Enamel, 
No. 2. Pineapple, Persian Red Enamel. Large 
apples. Dark Yellow Enamel. Dark apples, Rhodian 
Red. Small apples in back. Dull Yellow Enamel. 
Small sprigs, Persian Red Enamel and Green Enamel 
No. 2. Small dark panels at top, Persian Red 
Enamel, with centers of Dark Yellow. Baskets and 
bands of gold. 



SATSUMA CRACKER JAR 

DECORATION, All-over pattern. Flowers, No. 1 
Enamel for light part; Lavender Enamel for dark part, 
and Light Yellow Enamel for center. Leaves, Brown 
Enamel. Background, Blue Green Enamel. After firing for 
last time the jar was soaked in the strongest black tea for four 
days to bring out the crackle of the Satsuma, and to also give 
it a very old appearance. It is recommended by some that 
Satsuma should be boiled for several hours, but experience 
teaches that better results are attained by soaking for several 
days. 

GERMAN CHINA TOBACCO JAR 

Decoration, Poppy motive. Entire design car- 
ried out in Rouen Blue Enamel. 



LARGE SATSUMA BOWL 

DECORATION, Peacock tail motive and quaint 
flower combined. Enamels used in Peacock 
Tail, Dark Blue, Blue Green, Green No. 1. Old 
Egyptian Turquoise Blue, and Dull Violet. Flowers, 
Pink No. 1 and Pink No. 2 Enamels. Leaves, 
Green No. 1 and New Green. 



FRENCH CHINA BOWL 

DECORATION, Sprig and panel design of apple 
blossom. Blossom and leaves in panel and 
inside band done in Sevres Blue Enamel. Back- 
ground, inside band leaves and stems of sprigs, done 
in Rouen Blue Enamel. Sprig blossoms, Sevres 
Blue Enamel. The centre of all the blossoms done 
in Dull Blue Green Enamel. 



FRENCH CHINA FERN DISH 

DECORATION, Baskets of fruit and flowers, done in 
Flat Enamels. Flat Enamels are made by mixing glaze 
with color; note proportions. Baskets, leaves, stems, large 
apples and grapes are all done in Apple Green color, five parts 
to one part Grey Green Glaze. Flowers and Pomegranates, 
Dark Yellow color, four parts and one part Soft Yellow Glaze. 
Pine apples, Kawmo color, four parts to one part Soft Yellow 
Glaze. Tint on fernery is made of Copenhagen Grey color, 
three parts to one part Pearl Grey color. 




LARGE SATSUMA BOWL 
ENAMEL WORK OF DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 



208 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




ENAMEL WORK 
OF 
DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 



FRENCH 
CHINA BOWL 




INDIVIDUAL BREAKFAST SET IN FLAT ENAMELS 



SATSUMA BOWL 

Decoration, Persian motive. Done in 
Dark Blue Enamel, and Blue Green Enamel. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



209 




SALPAGLOSSIS— PHOTO. BY WALTER S. STILLMAN Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



THKSK flowers are all varieties of colors, blues, yellows, 
reds, and some in variegated colors as well. 
Paint these in the bluish lavenders, for we are so limited 
with flowers of these colorings. 

First Fire— The lights are Banding Blue and Violet 
No. 2; toward centers add Ruby Purple to the Blue and 
Violet; in the very centers use Brown Green and YeUow 
Brown. The veining in flowers are Blood Red and Violet. 



The stems are Yellow Brown and Brown Green; the leaves 
are Brown Green and Moss Green; the buds are paler than 
the flowers, use the coloring bluer. 

The second firing use same coloring, strengthen the 
shadow side of flowers and put in the stamens of the dark 
colors ; in flowers use more of the Yellow Brown. The back- 
ground use Yellow Violet and Shading Green mixed with 
the Violet where the dark in background is wanted. 



210 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



HOLLYHOCK BOWL 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

TINT the lower part of the bowl and dust the upper band 
with Neutral Yellow. Tint the panels with Olive Green 
Lay the seed pods with Neutral Yellow or Yellow Brown to 
which a little Black has been added to quiet it. Lay the path 
in Yellow Gold. 

Repeat for the second fire and for third fire outline with 
Black or Green. These quiet color schemes are pleasing. 



HOLLYHOCK VASE 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 
TAUST the lower panels with a soft Mat Olive Green (Fry's 
-■--' Olive will do). Lay the leaves, stems, seed pods and 
the background spaces with a glaze, Olive Green, and the path 
in Green Gold. If necessary go over the glaze color for the sec- 
ond fire and lay another coat of gold. For the third fire out- 
line all with Shading or Outlining Green. If one prefers the 
seed pods may be laid with Satsuma or Neutral Yellow (a soft 
tan) but the green m onochrome is very pleasing. 





TOBACCO THERMIDOR— HALLIE DAY 

To be executed in silver and gold. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



211 




HOLLYHOCK VASE— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 




HOLLYHOCK BOWL— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



212 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CANDLESTICK— THE CRAFTSMAN'S GUILD 



DIVIDE china into three parts. Trace design on carefully, 
and outline in India Ink. Do the straight lines with 
the aid of a small flexible rule. Clean with turpentine. Paint 
the darkest parts of design with German Black, mixed as for 
any painting. Apply rather heavily as this gives almost as 
rich, glossy a black as the dusted color. Lower part of flower, 
thin wash of Blood Red. Upper part, same color, applied 
heavily. The stamens and stem portion are gold. This is 
all that can be done in the first fire. 

Second Fire — Tint the leaf, panels, and grey portion of 
cup with Shading Green applied evenly and lightly. Buds in 



Gold. No outline is needed if the background is padded 
evenly to the edges. 

TREATMENT BY JESSIE M. BARD 

Oil all dark parts of design and dust with two parts 
Shading Green, one-half part Apple Green, one part Grey for 
Flesh, one part Pearl Grey. The light part dividing the sec- 
tions, the stamen, the light part of design just above the sec- 
tion and the top of candlestick are Green Gold. Oil all the 
fiowers and dust with three parts Pearl Grey, one-half Albert 
Yellow. Oil all the remainder of the deisgn and dust with 
three parts Pearl Grey, one part Apple Green. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



213 




GLADIOLI— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 214) 



214 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



GLADIOLI (Pages 213, 215) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
OET palette with Rose, Carnation, Blood Red, Ruby, 
»^ Lemon Yellow, Apple Green, Shading Green and Yellow 
Brown, Grey for Flesh. 

Paint flowers in delicately with Carnation; the markings 
toward center are Blood Red and a little Ruby; the buds area 
little deeper, use the Carnation heavier; the leaves are Apple 
Green and a Little Yellow and shaded with Shading Green and 
a little Yellow Brown; the background is Lemon Yellow, 
Apple Green and Grey for Flesh. 

Second Fire— Wash a thin wash of Rose over the flowers; 



use Ruby and Rose in the centers and buds. Shade the shadow 
side of leaves with Apple Green and Shading Green. 

VASE (Page 217) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OIL entire surface of vase and dust with five parts Pearl 
Grey and one part Sea Green. Wipe out the place for 
the clouds and birds. 

Second Fire — Paint in the black quite heavy with Yellow 
Brown Lustre very thin. Paint a thin wash of Yellow over 
the clouds, just enough to soften the white. 




PLATE— WINIFRED GETTEMY 



OUTLINE design in Black. Center berry Blood Red 
and a little Yellow Red. Side sections of berry Blood 
Red and a little Violet. Leaves Dark Green and a little 
Apple Green. Wide band at edge Dark Green. Stems thin 



wash of Brown Green and a little Moss Green. 

Second Fire — Paint Special Oil over entire surface of 
plate, pad it until tacky and let it stand until partly dry, 
then dust it with Pearl Grey and a little Apple Green. 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



215 








GLADIOLI— HARRIETTE B. BURT 



(Treatment page 214) 



216 



RERAMIC STUDIO 





O 



HAT-PIN-HOLDER— WINIFRED GETTEMY 

Treatment Jessie M. Bard 

UTLINE design with Black. Cap of berries painted 
with Yellow Brown and a touch of Brown Green. Lower 
part of berry a thin wash of Yellow Red for light side and add 
Blood Red for shadow side. Stems, Brown Green and a little 
Yellow Brown. Leaves, Brown Green, a little Shading Green 
and a touch of Black. The dark color at top and bottom is 
Blood Red and a little Brown. The light background is an ivory 
tone, may be made of two parts Yellow Brown and one part 
Yellow Green. 



ROSE BORDER 

Katharine Soderberg 
Model the rose in a rather flat paste. Carry out wide 
stem with a line of hair paste. The narrow dark stem in flat 
Green Gold. Outline leaves with paste. 

Second fire. — Cover all paste with Mat Gold. Fill in 
leaves with Green Enamel made of Moss Green, a little Al- 
bert Yellow and a touch of Black and one-fifth part Relief 
White. 



7^^ />^v 7^ 




OWL BORDER— CHAS. BABCOCK 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

MOON, dark spot in eyes, outline of owl and bands are 
gold. Body of owl and three spots on head Yellow 
Brown Lustre, light part of eyes is Yellow Lustre. Back- 
ground, two parts Pearl Grey, one part Grey for Flesh. 





BEECHNUT BORDER— CHAS. BABCOCK 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

LIGHT part of nut Yellow and a little Yellow Brown, the 
outer part Auburn Brown and a little Yellow Brown, 
the dark touches Auburn Brown and Black. Stems and bands 
Auburn Brown and Blood Red. Background, a thin wash of 
Yellow Brown and a touch of Blood Red. 




'-^^i 



^^i 



T 



DESIGN FOR BORDER 

Clara Connor 
Design in two shades of gold with outline in color. 



JRONWEED BORDER— CHAS. BABCOCK 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

UTLINE and bands in gold. The dark form back of 
flower is painted with a delicate grey made of Pearl 
Grey and a very little Copenhagen Blue. Stamen, Deep Blue 
Green and a little Sea Green. Lower part of flower Aztec 
Blue and a little Copenhagen Blue. Stems, Apple Green. 



o 




MISTLETOE BORDER 



Ruth M. Ruck 



DARK leaves 
White Gold. 



m Green Gold. Light leaves Hasburg's 
Dots in Green Enamel using Apple Green 
and a little Yellow Green and one-fifth Relief White. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



2M 




o 
o 



P4 
6 

00 



W 

> 



218 



nERAMIC STUDIO 



BACHELOR'S BUTTON, (Page 219) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

COLORS on palette: Banding Blue and Deep Blue Green, 
Copenhagen Blue, Violet No. 2, Apple Green, Shading Green. 
First firing use Banding Blue and Deep Blue Green for 
the paler ones. The centers are Copenhagen Blue and Violet. 
The calyx is Apple Green and Shading Green. Stems are 
Shading Green. The darker flowers are Banding Blue and 



Copenhagen Blue. For background use a thin wash of Banding 
Blue at the top and shade toward flowers with Violet and Apple 
Green. 

Second Firing — Use same colors to touch up flowers; do 
not do much painting on the light side. Shade the centers 
with Violet and Banding Blue, then paint the stems and leaves 
with Apple Green and Shading Green with touches of Violet 
No. 2. 




JELLY PLATE— M. C. McCORMICK 



CENTER flower in blue, made of Dark Blue toned with a 
little Deep Purple and Brunswick Black with one- 
eighth enamel mixture. Flowers either side of center one 
yellow, made of Silver Yellow, toned with Deep Purple, add 
one-third enamel. Small half flowers in brackets, red of 
equal parts Capucine and Pompadour No. 23. 



Leaves, Apple Green toned with Deep Purple and Bruns- 
wick Black, add one-fourth enamel. 

Background of border dotted with gold, brackets filled 
with gold and handles and edge gold. Inlaid border, squares 
Black. 

Center of plate a delicate tint of Primrose Yellow. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



219 




BACHELOR'S BUTTON-PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 2 J 8) 



220 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



PHLOX (Page 221) 

Treatment, by Jessie M. Bard 

CAREFULLY sketch design in, then paint in the dark 
leaves back of flowers with Yellow Green, Shading Green 
and Black. Where the leaves come out in the light use less of 
Black and Shading Green; a little Apple Green with Yellow 
Green in the lightest leaves. The most delicate flowers are 
White leaving the white of china for lights and shading blos- 
soms with a little Apple Green and Violet in the darkest shadows. 
In flowers use a little Copenhagen Blue and Violet; the centers 



have a touch of Yellow and Blood Red. The bunch on right 
hand side of study is a deep Rose Pink. Paint blossoms with 
Blood Red very thin, so it is a delicate Rose color shade with 
a very little Violet added to the Blood Red. The centers are 
just the Blood Red. Background is Yellow, a little Violet 
and Apple Green around flowers and in deepest places use a 
little Grey for Flesh. 

Second Firing — Use same coloring used in flrst flre. The 
pink bunch is washed with a thin wash of Rose. Just strengthen 
the shadow side of flowers. 




PLATE— lONE WHEELER 

Outline of Black. Outer bands are of gold and spaces between are in Aztec Blue. 

various shapes of a dinner service. 



This design is easily adapted to the 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



221 




PHLOX— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN (Treatment page 220) 



222 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




GLADIOLI— (Supplement) 

Joseph Kallaus 
THIRST Fire— Paint pink flowers, the lightest tones with 
-T Rose Purple; the dark tones with Carmine Purple. 
Shade with Grey for Flowers. Paint petals with Banding 
Blue and Light Violet mixed. Paint light tones of white 
flowers with Grey for Flowers; use for the dark tones a little 
Light Violet in the Grey. For the centers use Albert Yellow. 
Wash out the light tones and what appears in the finished study 
as a light purple tone. Petals for white flowers with Copen- 
hagen Blue mixed with a little Ruby and a larger proportion 
of Ruby for the shading. The red flowers paint with Blood 
Red and shade by mixing a little Grey with it. Paint the bright 
tones with Yellow Red and wash out the high lights. For the 
petals use the same colors as used for the petals of the white 
flowers. Paint in the background with Blue Green and Grey 
and Light Violet and paint the faded flowers with a mixture 
of Light Violet, Yellow Brown and a little Ruby; the leaves 
with Blue Green, Yellow Green and Grass Green, shade with 
a mixture of Grass Green and Yellow Brown; the darkest shades 
with Shading Green or Black Green and Yellow Brown mixed. 
Second Fire — Wash over the background with Ivory Yel- 
low and Yellow Brown, then paint the background flowers 
with Carmine Purple, Yellow Brown and Grey. Go over the 
light tones in the leaves with Lemon Yellow and the same 
Greens used in first fire wherever necessary. Paint over the 
red flowers with Yellow Red. Where the grey is prominent 
paint over with Yellow Brown and Blood Red. Use the same 
colors for the faded flowers. Use a mixture of Ruby Purple 
and Violet of Iron for the darkest shades in red flowers. Go 
over the white flowers with a thin wash of Lilac and take out 
the white parts. For the purple tones in the centers of the 
white flowers use a little Copenhagen Blue. Paint the center 



of the pink flowers with a little Albert Yellow and the darker 
parts with Yellow Brown. The dark shade is Ruby and for 
the darkest use Ruby mixed with a small part of Light Violet. 

HELPFUL HINTS 

USE small wisps of cotton wrapped around point of the 
handle of small outliner for cleaning up work. 

Cotton that has been used for padding can be pulled 
apart loosely and put in a small pasteboard box with a hole 
in the top. From this hole small wisps can be pulled out of 
the box without raising lint, the arch enemy of the china 
painter. If the silk used for padding seems a little thin, use two 
layers over the cotton in padding for dry dusting and lustre 
work. This leaves no lint. 

- Use point of wax china pencil to pick up lint, bristles from 
your brush and dirt out of a background. 

Hold the pencil at right angle with the china and touch 
just the point to the bit of dirt you wish to remove. The mark 
left by the pencil will fire out. 

After cleaning brushes with turpentine, when through 
with work give them a touch of olive oil or clove oil to keep 
them soft. This must be cleaned out of brushes before using 
them for gold. 

When you can try drying china in the hot sun. There is 
no lint out of doors. 

When holes appear in fired lustre, it shows dirt; paint and 
fire again. Try to use lustre where there is no dirt. 

In putting brushes away for the summer place moth balls 
or camphor with them to prevent moths. 

Clean brushes and china with alcohol for lustre work. 
Do lustre work on a clear day and be sure the china is dry. 




GL A Dl OLI— JOSEPH KALLAUS 



FEBRUARY 1913 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACU SE , N. Y. 



ri:ramic studio 



223 



Brushes that have been used and you wish to lay away, 
clean with alcohol or wash well with soap and water and 
rinse and dry well. They will be like new. 

Grind all colors well with muller and gi'ound glass slab 
and they will work smoothly. 

Try clearing up all materials one day in the week, put 
fresh papers on paint tables and put studio in order. 
Work will go better and time saved by having everything 
in order. Mrs. Earl L. Ramsey. 

* * 

In the last two numbers of the Studio you have asked for 
helpful suggestions about our studios. I have a few little con- 
trivances of my own which I will gladly give you if you think 
them useful. At the left of my table on the window casing I 
have a small wall pocket in which I keep my tracings of units 
being used in class the most. Below this I have hung my spool 
of adhesive tape. To the right of my pocket I have a wall 
vase which holds my brushes and knives. On my table I 
keep a hair receiver which holds cotton and I find by keeping 
it in this I have much less lint. On the left end of my table I 
have an old fashioned shoe bag with three pockets. In one I 
keep clean silk, in another dirty silk and the third holds rags. 



I find by the use of these things that my table is much less 
cluttered and I spend little time in hunting for the small things 
so easily lost. Florence A. Huntington, 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

M. M. C. — The cause of your lustre rubbing off is because it was not 
fired liot enough. The opal should be applied very heavy. 

O. M. A. — The unfluxed gold is used as a second coating over unfluxed 
gold. The same is also best for over raised paste and also on the belleek ware. 

Mrs. R. — We cannot tell the cause of your china turning milky, there 
might be a number of reasons for it, it may have been the ware you used, or 
if you are using a kiln with an h'on firing pot it may be due to dampness in 
the kiln. Have you had this trouble with other pieces? If you have more 
trouble and wish to write more m detail concerning it we may be able to help 
you. 

J. E. H. — The spot in your gold is probably due to somatliing not being 
clean, either the brush or the lavender oil. 

F. W. and E. E. R. — For a tinting oil use 5 parts oil of copaiba, 1 part 
oil of cloves and enough oil of tar to darken it slightly. 

W. H. C. — The matt colors are applied like any other dusted colors, 
you will find directions for dry dusting in one of the "Lessons for Beginners." 
You probably dusted the color on while the oil was too wet or you may have 
applied the oil too heavily. 




FULL SECTION OF PLATE— L. R. LIGHTNER 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



TRACE the design and outline with India ink, making the 
necessary corrections. Paint in the bands and the form 
which connects the flowers in the outer border with three parts 
Banding Blue and one part Copenhagen Blue. The leaves are 
two parts Sea Green and one part Banding Blue. The outline 
around the flowers and the dark spots in them is Apple Green and 



a very little Violet No. 2. Give this a very hot fire. Second 
Fire — Oil over the entire surface with Special Tinting oil and 
pad until tacky, then dust with Pearl Grey and a very little 
Deep Blue Green, just enough of the latter to give it a blusih 
tint. (The full plate (9 inch diameter) was published in May, 
1912 Keramic Studio.) 



224 



re:ramic studio 



j K. E. CHERRY'S CHINA COLORS J 

I THE NAME OF MRS. CHERRY l 

) is a guarantee that these new colors were selected ) 

J with special care and artistic taste. > 

I The palette contains only about 40 colors, but it is complete l 
i and all that a china decorator needs to do i 

C refined, artistic work. ■ 



Some of the Special Dusting Colors Arej 



KE.CHE1 

China Colors 




YELLOW 



!0BINEAUPOTTEI« 
SYRACUSE. K^ 



a 



WATER GREEN NO. 1 
GLAZE FOR GREEN 
WATER LILY GREEN 
FLORENTINE GREEN 
BRIGHT GREEN 
CAMEO 
DEEP IVORY 
WATER GREEN NO. 2 



WATER BLUE 

GLAZE FOR BLUE 

GREY BLUE 

DARK BLUE FOR DUSTING i 

DOVE GREY 

MODE 

COFFEE BROWN 

YELLOW FOR DUSTING I 



TRY THEM \ 

Send for Complete Price List. Ask your Dealer for them. \ 



THE ROBINEAU POTTERY 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



HALL'S 
SUPERIOR ROMAN GOLD 

For Quality and Quantity is Unsurpassed 

PUT UP IN DUST PROOF BOXES 

LARGE SIZE (18 grains) 75c per box. $7 20 per dozen 
FRENCH " (U " ) 50c " ' $4.75 " 
SMALL " ( 6 " ) 26c " ■' $2.60 " 

POSTAGE OR EXPRESSAGE PAID 

SEND FOB A FREE SAMPLE 

Man«facttirers also of the 



FAMOUS UNIQUE GOLD 



REGISTERED 

Put up in 

Sealed 

Glass Pans 

Single Box 50c 




U. S. PATENT 
No. 82511 



Requires but 

one application 

and one fire 



.75 per dozen 



Franklin Hall 



116 NORTH 
15TH STREET 



Philadelphia. Pa. 



DEALER IN ALL MATERIALS FOR CfflNA DECORATION 



ii 



THE ART OF ENAMELING ON PORCELAIN 



?9 



1 


'•■■■ 


I 


h" Art of Er.ameling - 
g,- on Porcelain 1 



By Dorothea Warren-O'Hara 



A Book of Great Practical Value to the Decorator 
Whether a Beginner or expert 

nPHIS BOOK gives clear, precise and unmistakable information as to the proper 
choice and the proper application of enamels to porcelains, whether hard or 
soft glaze, whether domestic or imported. 

It has twenty-two fine half-tone engravings. The rental value of the water- 
color drawings of these same engravings amounts to over $50.00. Twenty of them 
are from original pieces by the author; two are good examples of Chinese and 
Japanese enameling. 

Publishers' price $3, and many decorators who have seen it say that in practi- 
cal value it is worth ten times the price. "We have about a thousand copies, special- 
ly bound in boards, which we can sell for 

$1.50, POSTAGE PAID BY US 

This o£Fer extends only to the limited number now on hand and may be withdrawn 
at any time. 

NOTE — In previous advertisements we have ofifered a limited number of this book at $L, each copy containing a coupon 
which was good for $1. toward the purchase of materials, the book being thus obtainable practically free of charge. 
Of the original allotment of books for this purpose we have fifty left, wrapped, ready for mailing and will send these 
fifty with the redeemable coupon to the first fifty applications ENCLOSING $1. AND GIVING NAME OF ONE OR 
MORE FRIENDS INTERESTED IN CERAMIC WORK. This offer is then withdrawn. 

WARREN-O'HARA COLOR COMPANY 

132 EAST I9TH STREET, NEW YORK 




When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine. 



^,IH'i< 





The entire contents of (his Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF MARCH, 19 J3 



Edftorial Notes 

Helpfol Hfnts 

Design 

Bowl, Goard Motif 

Hydrangea 

Stock, Jilly 

Service Plate 

Salad Bowl, Miner's Lettuce Motif 

Lady Slipper 

Salt Shakers and Cap and Saucer 

Plate Designs 

Designs for Bowls, Insect Motif 

Brodiaea 

Border, Mimtilas 

Border, Mission Bells 

Yellow Mariposa Lilies 

Pink and Yellow Sand Verbenas 

Border, California Poppy 

Border, Manzanita 

Border, Mimulus 

Matilija Poppy 

Wild Hollyhock 

Plate, Wild Holyhock Motif 

Fairy Lantern 

Answers to Correspondents. 

Wild Aster (Supplement) 

Small Bowl Design 

Bitter Sweets 





Page 




225 


Gertrude Gilpin and M. E. Clemens 


245 


Kathryn E. Cherry 


226-228 


Henrietta B. Paist 


227 


Margaret Ovcrbeck 


228 


Mabel E. Head 


229 


M» W. Caudle 


230-231 




232-233 


Edna S. Cave 


234 


A. W. Heckman 


235 


Maud Chapin 


236 


Daisy Zug 


237 


J. M. Culbertson 


238 


Ida A. Johnson 


238 


J. M, Culbertson 


238 


J, M. Culbertson 


239 


J. M. Culbertson 


240 


Ida A. Johnson 


241 


Ida A. Johnson 


241 


J. M. Culbertson 


241 


Ida A. Johnson 


242 


J. M. Culbertson 


243 


J. M, Culbertson 


244 


J. M. Culbertson 


245 




245 


C. L. Wiard 


245 


Frances Ellen Newman 


245 


Harriette B. Burt 


246 



M ■ " " " """" " ■ "" * ' ' " " »^ ^ i «ir™»w"Bm ni i iiiiii iiiiii ■ ■■■■ i p ^ 

THE OLD RELIABLE i»i2d^ FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




■e 



No. 2 Sizel4xI2in..„...430.00) 

No. 3 Size 16 x t9 in 40.00 j Gas Kiln 2 sizes 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



Charcoal Kila 4 sizes. 



/ No. f Size JO X « In. $15.00 

No. 2 Size 16 x 12 In. 20.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 15 fai. 25.00 

I No. 4 Size 18 X 26 In. 50.00 



SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



jy 



Vol. XIV No. n. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



March 191 3 




CORRESPONDENT WTites that she 
can make more money raising chickens 
than painting china, for which reason 
she has decided not to continue her 
subscription to Keramic Studio until 
she can see more money in china 
painting than she does now! Cer- 
tainly if money-making is the chief 
end sought in china paintmg or in any 
art, it is far more sensible and sincere 
to take to poultry farming. With eggs at fifty and sixty cents 
a dozen and chickens at twenty-five to fifty cents a pound a 
small fortune awaits the foresighted and industrious woman 
who devotes herself scientifically and whole-heartedly to the 
care of that succulent bird. It is strange how few understand 
what is necessary to success in any undertaking. It is for this 
reason that so many false starts are made and ill success is laid 
not to one's own self but to the occupation. 

For financial success in china painting as well as in any- 
thing else, it is necessary that the work be undertaken, first, 
because you love it, second, because you love it better than 
anything else, and third, and last, because you love it so that 
you know you can not give it up and you must make a success of 
it. "It is love that makes the world go round." If work is 
undertaken because of whole-hearted love for it, success 
artistic and success financial and every other kind of success is 
bound to follow, because every faculty, every thought will be 
concentrated on that one point and your success will be the 
measure of all that is in you. But understand well, money 
making must be only a secondary aim. Some have the faculty 
of money-making and some not. To the first kind of person 
m.oney is the chief object and if art is used simply as a means to 
that end the success artistic will never come to them. They 
will be, as it were, gold brick sellers, and for a while they will 
make money simply by their power of hypnotising, at the same 
time they will damn their own souls by selling the false for the 
true art. No man can serve two masters, and as between money 
and art, as a master, money will follow the real thing in art as 
a natural sequence, but art never follows the money seeker as 
a natural sequence. 

As for those who are not money makers by nature, that 
is much as you think yourself. If you have real talent and 
perseverance the money cannot fail to come. Believe in your- 
self. Love your work. Think success. You can not fail. 
>h 
It never pays in painting of any kind to buy cheap materials, 
colors, brushes, gold or anythmg else. The beginner has 
troubles enough without hampering herself with inferior work- 
ing tools and the advanced worker has too much respect for 
her work to risk spoiling it. Economy lies rather in the good- 
ness of the material than in the cheapness of the price. 
'b 
We are giving in this issue some interesting sketches of 
California flowers and designs from there by Miss Johnson 
and Miss Culbertson. There is a wealth of new and good 
material in California and we wish we would hear more often 
from the designers of the far West. We had a promise once 
of a number of Keramic Studio devoted to the woi'k of a Cali- 



fornia Club but it never materialized. We know that good 
work is being done there and hope that some California Club 
will be interested to send us a representative lot of designs. 
-h 

Friends of the editor of Keramic Studio who would like 
to see the Robineau porcelains may be interested in the itiner- 
ary of the collection which is now being exhibited in the Cin- 
cinnati Museum after having been shown at the Chicago Art 
Institute, Buffalo Albright Galleries and St. Louis Museum; 
from Cincinnati it goes to the Philadelphia Museum in March 
and the Boston Museum in April. 

HELPFUL HINTS 

OUR work-table is covered with white oil cloth and a jar is 
provided for the dirty turpentine that is left, after the 
lesson is over. When this settles, it is used to clean the oil 
cloth, with good results and little trouble. 

Glass jars with lids, such as stick and fancy candies are 
sold in, are used for such supplies as brushes, palette knives, 
pencils, burnishers, etc. A glance at the jars shows just what 
is wanted and the supplies are kept free from dust. They are 
also used for holding the tracings, made on tracing cloth, of 
conventional designs, and labeled, as plate borders, steins, 
vases, bowls and so on. In this way they are easily found 
and the pupil can wait on himself, putting them back after 
they are through with them. 

A large note book, with place for index and pages numbered, 
having plenty of space allotted for such subjects as Enamels, 
Gold, Color Combinations, Design, Firing, Water-Colors, etc., 
in which I make notes on the different subjects whenever I 
discover or read something new upon them, has been of gi'eat 
personal benefit to me. 

Often, in spacing designs and making drawings on china 
a line is shown that should not be outlined and it is difficult 
for a new pupil to remember this; the eraser on the end of a 
lead pencil removes these lines easily and quickly. 

A good color card will often convince a pupil of the merit, or 
lack of merit, of a certain color combination where words fail, 
the same as a blistered plate of a certain porcelain with a very 
soft glaze stopped the bringing of that ware to be decorated. 

Gertrude Gilpin. 

We can't all have filing cabinets for our studies, try this 
simple method and save hours of time: Take the leaves out of 
an old letter-file or make same out of stiff brown paper, letter- 
ing from "A-Z" and "Special." Place in your portfolio and 
file studies according to flower, placing odd designs or "purely 
conventional" and historic ornaments under the "Special." 

Tie a rag around the neck of your medium bottle, it will 
never become sticky. 

Buy a ten cent package of surgeon's plaster, cut up as 
needed to make the pad that holds yom- compass. 

Who has not tried to draw a line where a keramic gauge 
could not be used. Try placing the china on a smooth surface 
such as a tile. Place flat objects — books or boxes to the re- 
quired height. Hold your pencil flatly on them and twirl 
your china. The result is a perfect line. M. E. Clemens 



226 



RIIRAMIC STUDIO 



DESIGN 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

DARK in line, the relation in width of the dark and light 
lines, is another means of interest in carrying out design. 
As long as we depend upon the use of lines in uniform widths 
whose sole purpose is to break up the space, we are enjoying 
the design from the point of space relation. As we elaborate 
our designs, however, we grace them by introducing a new 
means of expression, that of varying the widths of lines. This 
gives lis unlimited ways of expressing the same idea, just as 
we might express a beautiful theme in music with variations 
of time, which in design corresponds to space; then in tone cor- 
responding to light and dark in design. 

The range of this variation may seem limited at first; 
that it is not we may see if we look about us in our homes, in 
the shops, and at the decorations in public places. There is, 
in fact, unlimited opportunity in this direction. 

The early weavers depended entirely upon dark in line 
and left us fine examples which mean much toward our appre- 
ciation of what may be done in the simplest way by the use 
of lines in dark and light. Our American Indians had an 
appreciation of this means of decoration; their rugs, blankets, 
baskets, and bead-work are splendid examples. In many of 
the old mosaic floors, slabs, foundations, in Indian and Persian 
rugs, we find interesting illustrations. There are no set rules 
for us to follow; but we have reproductions of the best that has 
been accomplished from which to obtain suggestions. In our 
museums we have the old textiles, pottery, basketry; in li- 
braries we have books on the subject at our command. We 
should avail ourselves of these opportunities to gain informa- 
tion of what has been accomplished. 

Just as soon as we put a spot on paper it calls our attention. 
It makes a great deal of difl'erence just where we put this spot 
within an outline, say a square or a circle. Think of a picture 
with a moon in it. Now, where is thfe proper place for it in 
the picture? Never in the center, nor too much to either side, 
nor toward the edge, nor below the horizon. 

You see how important it is to know this; so it is with the 
problems. We shall take up in this course the importance of 
knowing where to put the weight of units, the dark and light 
in pattern. One of the best examples, which is easily obtained 
and familiar to most of us, is the portrait by James McNeil 
Whistler of his mother. How well placed the figure is on the 
canvas! then the lines which fill the space made by the picture, 
the simplicity of form, the balance of lines, the dark and light. 
Many such examples are found in the compositions of the old 
masters. Among these are Leonarda Da Vinci, Botticelli, 
Michael Angelo, Raphael, all of whom understood the law of 
line balance, space filling and the beauty of light and dark. 
We should never fail to study the Japanese, as their prints are 
splendid illustrations and can be easily obtained. 

Exercise L 

Before we proceed with our problems, learn to run your 
scales smoothly; that is, learn to make firm, expressive India 
ink lines in varying widths. This practice is very necessary, 
and the control of the brush can be gained only in this way. 
The freedom in the use of the brush obtained in this way is 
remarkable and will be a great joy to you in all your work. 

Pin a sheet of paper so that it is straight on the drawing 
board; this is essential if you would have good lines. The 
line must not be drawn with the fingers. The whole hand and 
arm does the work with one stroke. Hold the brush in a 
perpendicular position, with the small fingers as your gauge; 
decide upon the width of the line; then with a slow sweep draw 
your brush from left to right. 



Make lines not less than four inches long; it is advisable to 
go slowly; then the line can be watched as it develops under the 
brush. Try this exercise in lines of various widths, making 
lines of uniform weight close together in groups of six or more. 
These exercises and experiments are things we should like to 
skip over in our studies, but only as we advance do we appre- 
ciate the necessity of practice and then we regret having shirked 
it. Any time given to this sort of work is beneficial. It is 
well to practice these exercises whenever a few leism-e moments 
can be had, before taking up the more serious work of carrying 
out the lessons. A large part of your success in designing will 
depend upon your ability to make good firm lines. The ability 
to make good lines is most encouraging to the student. If the 
lines are weak, nervous ones, there is no incentive to develop 
the design. When we draw a curve, the very direction or 
position it takes will suggest either a graceful or an awkward 
line. For this reason it behooves us to spend some time on 
what might be termed a playful exercise. 

Exercise II. 

Problem I. — Make four examples of squares, using 
straight lines, varying the width of lines to express dark and 
light in line. For example note Figure I. 

Problem II. — ^Make two examples of rectangles, size 
2x3 carried out in oblique lines. Vary the width of lines. 
See Figure II. 

Problem III. — Make three plaids size 4 inches square. 
Vary the width of lines. Note the variety of space in Figure 
III. 




1 




















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IIEKAMIC STUDIO 



227 



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228 



REKAMIC STUDIO 




Problem IV. — Make four two and one-half inch squares A design for center and border, the circle in the center should 

with oblique lines. Vary the size of the lines. See Figures not be more than one and one-half inches in circumference. 

IV and V. This problem is to be worked out with lines of various widths, 

Problem V. — Make two plate designs, size eight inches, expressing dark and light. See Figures VI and VII. 




HYDRANGEA— MARGARET OVERBECK 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




STOCK- JILL Y— MABEL E. HEAD 



FIRST Fire — Outline design Avith Gre}- for Flesh, then fire. 
Second fire — The blossoms are Blood Red very deli- 
cate. Stems, use Violet and Blood Red. The leaves are 
Moss Green and Brown Green. 



Third Fire — Wash background with Yellow Brown, 
Brown Green, Violet. Touch flowers with Rose, the leaves 
with Brown Green. 



230 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



m 1 
'■"lit' 




FULL SIZE BORDER SECTION 




FULL SIZE CENTER 
SERVICE PLATE— M. W. CAUDLE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



231 



BOWL, GOURD MOTIF (Page 227) 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

TRACE the design with India Ink. Go over it with Out- 
lining Black (water mixture). Let design lap over the 
inside as indicated. When dry tint the entire bowl with Neutral 
Yellow, Satsuma, or a mixture of Dresden Yellow Ochre, nine- 
tenths, and Black, one-tenth. After firing lay the leaves. 



stems and gourd in two tones of Grey Green. 

The flower is just tinged with soft Yellow, mix Albert 
Yellow and Yellow Ochre. Dry and outline all strongly again 
with Black (oil mixture). This firing should complete the 
bowl, but if the colors are not flat or values strong enough, 
repeat the washes of Green and fire again. This design is 
just as attractive on small cylinder vase or stein. 




SERVICE PLATE— M. W. CAUDLE 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OIL the grey tones in the flowers and dust with three 
parts Pearl Grey, one part Deep Blue Green. Oil 
the dark spaces in flowers and the dark bands and dust 
with two parts Sea Green, one part Banding Blue, two parts 
Pearl Grey. Oil the remainder of the design and dust with 



two parts Yellow Green, one part Sea Green, three parts Ivory 
Glaze, two parts Pearl Grey. 

Second Fire — Oil over entire surface and dust with Pearl 
Grey and a little Apple Green. (Original design 11-inch 
diameter). 



232 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




CENTER OF SALAD BOWL 



SALAD BOWL, MINER'S LETTUCE 

THE little wild flower Claytonia perfoliata, commonly 
called Miner's Lettuce, is found in early spring growing 
in shady places in California. Children are found of eating 
its crisp and succulent leaves. 

For the first painting of the salad bowl lay in the gen- 
eral ground tint both inside and outside of the bowl with a 
light wash of Yellow Brown, Gray Yellow and Moss Green 
mixed and then fire. 

For the next painting carefully trace on the design, then 
tint the lower panels the same as the ground tint only darker. 
The leaves are Moss Green, Gray Yellow, Yellow Brown and 
a touch of Violet of Iron. The stems are the same only a 
little more Violet of Iron added. ^ 

The black portions are Black, Shading Green and Brown 
Green mixed. Use this color also for the outlines. For the 
flowers use Pompadour very light. The center of the little 
units between the leaves and on the lower leaves are Ruby. 

For the third fire strengthen all the colors and outlines. 

The center and inside border of the salad bowl is to be 
carried out in the same colors. 






BORDER, CALIFORNIA POPPY (Page 241) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT the poppies and buds with Lemon Yellow and 
shade with Brown Green and a little Yellow Brown for 
the warmer touches. Stamens are Yellow Brown and a little 
Brown Green. Leaves are Apple Green and Lemon Yellow 
and for the stems add a little Shading Green. Background 
is a thin wash of Grey for Flesh and a little Violet. 

BORDER— MANZANITA (Page 242) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE with Grey for Flesh. Oil fruit and dust with 
three parts Ivory Glaze, one part Albert Yellow and 
one part Yellow Brown. Oil the leaves and dust with one part 
Grey Yellow, one part Yellow Brown, three parts Ivory Glaze. 
Oil stems and dust with one part Royal Purple, one-half part 
Aztec Blue, two parts Ivory Glaze, two parts Pearl Grey. If 
a background is desired oil and dust with Pearl Grey and a 
little Yellow. 

BORDER— MIMULUS (Page 241) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE design with Blood Red and a little Grey for 
Flesh. The large petals and those that are turned 
over are oiled and dusted with three parts Ivory Glaze, one 
part Albert Yellow, one part Yellow Brown. Oil the lower 
part of the flower and dust with two parts Rose, three parts 
Ivory Glaze, two parts Albert Yellow, one-half part Grey Yel- 
low. Stamens are painted with Yellow Brown and Yellow 
Red. Remainder of the design is oiled and dusted with three 
parts Pearl Grey and one part Apple Green. Background is 
Pearl Grey and a little Yellow. 



MINER'S LETTUCE 




RERAMIC STUDIO 



233 



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234 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




LADY SLIPPER— EDNA S, CAVE 

OUTLINE design with Black, fire. Second Fii'ing— Paint 
flowers with Violet and a Uttle Grey for Flesh. The 
leaves are Shading Green and Apple Green. Thu-d Firing- 
Wash a flat background of Apple Green toned with Violet. 



EXHIBITION NOTE 

The Keramic Society of Greater New York announces an 
exhibit of decorated table china in the sun-parlor of the Wal- 
ford-Astoria during the week March 10-15 inclusive. The 
public is invited daily between 10:30 a. m. and 10:00 p. m., ex- 
cepting Monday evening. 

SALT SHAKERS (Page 235) 

Treatments by Jessie M. Bard 
No. 1 

DESIGN is gold, the grey tone is Light Green Lustre and 
the light back of design is Opal or Mother of Pearl 
Lustre. 

No. 2 
Leaves and wide band in center are oiled and dusted with 
two parts Apple Green, one part Y^ellow Green, one part Ivory 
glaze. Remainder of design is Green Gold. 
No. 3 
Design is Gold. Background back of design is Opal 
Lustre. Oil lower part of the shaker and dust with Pearl 
Grey and a very little Y^ellow Green. 

CUP AND SAUCER (Page 235) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OIL all the grey tones and dust with three parts Pearl Grey, 
one part Violet No. 2 and a pinch of Deep Blue Green. 
Oil the dark tone and dust with one part Royal Purple, 
half Aztec Blue, two parts Pearl Grey. 

DESIGNS FOR BOWLS, INSECT MOTIF (Page 237) 
Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OIL body of bug and dust with two parts Banding Blue, 
one part Aztec Blue; oil remainder of the design and 
dust with two parts Yellow Green, one-half part Violet, one 
part Pearl Grey. 

Second Fire — Oil over the entire surface and dust with 
two parts Pearl Grey. 

No. 2 

Outline the wings and paint body with gold. Bands 
at the top and bottom of bowl and also at the bottom of 
design are also of gold. 

Paint the wings with two parts Yellow Red and one part 
Lemon Y'ellow. The two lines just above the wing and the 
perpendicular line between each section are painted with Auburn 
or Hair Brown and a little Blood Red. Paint the remainder 
of the design with Black and a little Blood Red. Paint an 
ivoiy tone back of the border and oil the lower part of bowl 
and dust with two parts Pearl Grey, one-half part Grey for 
Flesh, one part Yellow Brown, one-half part Blood Red. 

No. 3 
Oil the bug and the wide perpendicular space between 
the bugs and dust with ^three parts, Ivory Glaze, one part 
Albert Yellow, one part Yellow Brown. Paint the three 
spaces at the head with Yellow Red. Oil the band at the top 
and bottom and dust with two parts Yellow Green, one part 
Shading Green, two parts Pearl Grey. Oil the remainder of 
the design and dust with two parts Y'ellow Green, one part 
Violet No. 2, one part Pearl Grey, one part Ivory Glaze. If a 
background is desired it may either be painted or dusted with 
Pearl Grey and a little Y^ellow. 



nEKAMIC STUDIO 



235 









SALT SHAKERS— A. W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment page 234) 




CUP AND SAUCER-A. W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment page 234) 



236 



heramic studio 




PLATE DESIGN— MAUD CHAPIN 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



This design may be carried out in Green Gold except the round spots which may be oiled and dusted with two parts Apple 

Green and one part Yellow Green. 




PLATE DESIGN— MAUD CHAPIN 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



o 



IL the design and dust with two parts Yellow Green, one- over the entire border and dust with one part Pearl Grey, one 
half Violet, one part Pearl Grey. Second Fire — Oil part Ivory Glaze and a pinch of Yellow Green. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



237 






DESIGNS FOR BOWLS, INSECT MOTIF— DAISY ZUG (Treatments page 234) 



238 



RERAMIC STUDIO 

CALIFORNIA WILD FLOWERS BY IDA A. JOHNSON AND J. M. CULBERTSON 





JllT^ul.^ 



BORDER. MIMULUS— IDA A. JOHNSON 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THIS design could be used very nicely as an all-over pat- 
tern on a marmalade jar or a small surface. Outline 
rather heavily with gold. Paint the flowers with Lemon Yel- 
low and a very little Yellow Red. Paint the stamen and pistil 
with Yellow Red or Coral enamel. Backgi-ound Pearl Grey 
or little Grey for Flesh and a little Yellow. 






dMs- 



ro(liriFa 



BORDER, MISSION BELLS— J. M. CULBERTSON 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



BRODIAEA— J. M, CULBERTSON 

Treatment page 245 



lynrl-ifl 9?\ r rl V/ T mm TTLOWERS are painted with a thin wash of Yellow shaded 

tLIMil/LLt-L LUULlViLU-^ Jr with a little Yellow Brown. The dark in center of 

flower is Yellow with a little Brown Green. Stamens are 
Yellow Red. Outline is Grey for Flesh. Stems are Moss 
Green and a little Yellow. Leaves, Moss Green and a little 
Grey for Flesh. Background two parts Pearl Grey, one part 
Grey for Flesh and a little Yellow Brown. 



nURAMIC STUDIO 



239 





YELLOW MARIPOSA LILIES— J. M. CULBERTSON Treatment by Katliryn E. Cherry 

THE flowers are a deep yellow. Paint the flowers with Brown Green, Mauve. Second Fire — Same color as used in 

Yellow for Painting, Yellow Brown, a little Yellow the first fii'e. Strengthen the flowers with Painting Yellow 

Red in the very centers; stems are Brown Green; buds are and Brown Green, to this add a little Yellow Red in the dark 

Yellow Green and Brown Green. Background, Yellow Brown, shadows. 



240 



KERAMIC STUDIO 










J. M. CULBERTSON 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



241 




BORDER, CALIFORNIA POPPY— IDA A. JOHNSON 



(Treatment page 232) 




BORDER, MANZANITA~IDA A. JOHNSON (Treatment page 232) 




BORDER, MIMULUS— J. M. CULBERTSON 



(Treatment page 232) 



242 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




(laTiUeinPc 

HonNEVR 



MATILIJA POPPY—IDA A. JOHNSON 



Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 



The flowers are white, shaded with Painting Yellow to the centers. Paint the shadow side of flower with Apple Green 
and Rose. Centers are Painting Yellow and Apple Green. Leaves are Yellow Green, Shading Green and 

a little Brown Green. 



liERAMIC STUDIO 



243 




WILD HOLLYHOCK— J. M. CULBERTSON Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

OUTLINE design with Grey for Flesh, then fire. Paint and a little Mauve. For the background use Albert Yellow, 

flowers with Yellow for Painting and a little Pompadour Brown Green, a little Mauve, 
shading toward the centers with Blood Red. The leaves are Second Fire— Same colors as used in the first firing. Just 

Apple Green and Brown Green, the stems are Brown Green strengthen the shadow side of flowers. 



244 



ri:ramic studio 



WILD ASTER (Supplement) 

C. L. Wiard 

FIRST Fire--After carefully blocking in the flower spaces, 
paint in the stems and leaves, using Yellow Green and 
Blue Green for the lighter tones and shade with Olive Green 
and a little Black in the darker places. Then paint the 
flowers with a good size pointed shader, using Blue Violet for 
the general tone and Deep Violet for the darker ones. Wash 
out the high lights with a little Turquoise Blue in the brush. 



The centers are of Lemon Yellow shaded with Yellow Brown 
and Pompadour and Black. The shadows may be painted 
in with any grey. Warm Green or Yellow and Deep Violet 
is good. Second Fire — Lay in the background with Lemon 
Yellow and a little Yellow Green in places. Paint over the shadow 
forms and some of the flowers. Shade the flowers with Deep 
Violet and a little Black in the darkest parts. Strengthen the 
stems and touch up the centers. A little white enamel may be 
used effectively on the lighter flowers. 




PLATE, WILD HOLLYHOCK MOTIF— J. M. CULBERTSON Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OUTLINE design in Grey for Flesh and a very little Black. 
Flowei's and buds are painted with a thin wash of 
Blood Red making a delicate pink and shaded with Blood 
Red and a very little Ruby. 

Grey tones at the edge painted with Grey Yellow and a 



very little Yellow Brown. Dark spaces back of flowers are 
gold. Leaves and stems are a thin wash of Moss Green and 
Grey for Flesh. Pistil of flower is Black and a little Ruby. 
A wash of an ivory tone may be put over the balance of the 
plate. 



'*^\.. 









WILD ASTERS — C. L. WIARD 



MARCH 1913 

SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STU DIO 



COPYRIGHT 1913 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



nERAMlC STUDIO 



245 




LANTERNS OF THE FAIRIES— J. M. CULBERTSON 
(Calochortus Alb«s) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

SKETCH in the design, paint the leaves with Apple Green 
and Shading Green; the stems with Brown Green and 
Shading Green; the flowers are shaded with Mauve and a 
little Apple Green, leaving the high lights white. Paint the 
background with Copenhagen Blue, Mauve, Shading Green. 

Second Fire — Paint a thin wash of Painting Yellow over 
the flowers, strengthen the leaves with Yellow Green, and a 
little Grey for Flesh. 

^ -p 

BRODIAEA (Page 238) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

THE flowers are a delicate yellow. Paint the flowers very 
thin with Painting Yellow, shaded toward centers with 
Apple Green, the very center is stronger Yellow. Leaves, 
Apple Green, Shading Green and a touch of Black, the stems 
ai-e a tender yellow, use Yellow and Apple Green. 



SMALL BOWL DESIGN IN THREE SHADES OF BLUE 

Frances Ellen Newman 

OUTLINE a good wide line using two parts Copenhagen 
Blue, one part Banding Blue. Fire. Paint over the 
entire surface with two parts Copenhagen Blue and one part 
Banding Blue. When quite dry dust with same then clean 
out the flower and leaves and fire. 

Third Fire — Paint over the entire surface with Russian 
Green very thin and when dry dust with Pearl Grey. 

YELLOW SAND VERBENA (Page 240) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

FLOWERS, Painting Yellow, shaded with Yellow Brown 
and Brown Green. Center, Yellow Red. Leaves, 
Brown Green and Yellow Brown . Stems, Yellow Brown and Black . 

PINK SAND VERBENA (Page 240) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

PAINT flowers with Rose. Centers with Yellow. Leaves, 
Moss Green and Brown Green. Stems, Blood Red and 
Mauve. 

BITTER SWEET— HARRIETTE B. BURT (Page 246) 
Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 
UTLINE the design with Blood Red. Fire. Paint the 
berries with Yeflow Red, shade with Blood Red. Leaves, 
Yellow Brown, a little Brown Green. Stems, Auburn Brown. 
Third Fire — Oil and dust a background with Coffee Brown. 
Then clean the berries out with a little on the end of a brush 
handle. 

it -^ 

STUDIO NOTES 

Mrs. Bonnie Webb Moseley, teacher of china painting 
and design, of Houston, Texas, has changed the location of 
her studio to 412 Beatty Building, on Main Street. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

L. D. — The gold you mention is a secret with the factories. If you buy 
the pure gold which comes m powder form I think you wall find it more of a 
yellow tone. 

Mary y<! . Knight. — We regret that we haven't the color study of Rose 
'I'ray by Ida M. Ferris, which was published in our Rose Book. We give you 
the address of the artist, Mrs. Ida M. Pen-is, Holdridge, Fostoria, O. She 
may furnish you with the required studj-. This inquiry would have been 
answered by mail if you had given xis your address. 

R. G. H. — The design for dinner set was not to be outhned as it was to 
be carried out in one fire. Most pupils like to save as much firing as possible 
and in that case it is well to eneouraKe them to work for one fire when it is 
jjossible, some designs require more. Transparent green lustre requires a 
hard fire, the trouble is not in the firing when it is spotted but in the applica- 
tion. Some dust may have settled into it or some other foreign substance 
that is injurious to it. 

J. C. M. — The treatment for the prize dinner set design was written for 
one fire, so carry it out just as it i.s given; where the outline is between the 
leaves a fine line can be scratclied. The center of the flower is the large 
light spot or pistil. If you prefer uskig an outline you may use Banding 
Blue and Grey for Flesh. It is a matter of choice whether you use pen or 
brush for outlining. The color is thinned with oil of lavender when outlining 
with a brush. You can use your gauge for this work. 



246 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




2)lft*o^- Sv#ss< 



"RAILSBACKS 



99 



THE 
KERAMIC 



'^T^JC^f:0^ 




ART 
CENTER 



Our new catalog 



I^Aci U«3 clir^AA^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ efforts are 
JxeSUilS &I10VV appreciated and en- 
courage us to push 'forward with renewed 
efforts to make "our shop" the Keramic Art 
Center for this community. 

containing the 
cream of the pot- 
ters' art, will be ready for distribution in 
March and you are requested to send us your 
name and address, that we may send you a 
copy. 

We are pleased to announce that Maude 
McPherson Hess and Meta K. Schumacher 
will continue as our teachers— their efforts 
having won them great admiration from their 
many pupils as well as from the public. 

EVERYTHING FOR THE CHINA DECORATOR 

RAILSBACK CHINA CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



39 West 
21st St. 

BETWEEN 5TH 
AND 6TH AVES. 

N. Y. Ctty 

Importer of 

White China Novelties, Etc. 




Specials for this month only 




AUSTRIAN CHINA TEA CUP AND SAUCER 

SPECIAL, 16 CENTS EACH, NET 

REGULARLY SOLD FOR 28 CENTS 

THIS IS A 
SPECIAL BARGAIN 



China 
Salt, 5c each net 




Austrian China 
Barrel Sugar Shaker, 10c each ne 
Twisted Sugar Shaker, 10c each r 



The above goods are First Quality China— no seconds 

Illustrated catalogue of French China and Royal Satsuma Ware 
now ready for mailing. Agents for Revelation Kiln, Keramic 
Studio, Sleeper's and Hasbur^'s Gold. 



/(/, / n 



CONTRIBUTORS 



JESSIE M. BARD 
H. U BRIDWELL 
ELINOR BRIERLEY 
HARRIETTE B. BURT 
KATHRYN E. CHERRY 
CLARA L, CONNOR 
OPHELIA FOLEY 
MAY B. HOELSCHER 
MRS, GEORGIA D. KIMMONS 
HENRIETTA B. PAIST 
WALTER S. STILLMAN 
ALICE B. SHARRARD 
EDNA MANN SHOVER 
LILLIAN STURGES 
YUKEY R/ TANAKA 
MATILDA VOORHEES 
F, R. WEISKOPF 



7/ 



APRIL MCMXIII Price 40c. Yeariy Subscription M-OO 



^^^ 



^onian 



MAR 27 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF APRIL, J9J3 







Page 


Editorial Notes 




247 


Pompano Fish Panel (Supplement) 


H. L. BridweH 


248-249 


Bonbonniere (Supplement) 


Ophelia Foley 


248 


Helpful Hints 


-^ Elinor Brierley 


248 


Poetaz Narcissus 


Photo by Walter S. Stiflman 


250 


Narcissus 


Harriette B. Burt 


251 


Dinner Set 


F, R. Weiskopf 


252-253-254-256 


Nut Bowl 


May B. Hoelscher 


254-255 


Cup and Saucer 


Mrs. Georgia D. Kimmons 


256 


Cottage Tulips 


Photo by Walter S. Stillman 


257 


Honey Jar 


Clara L. Connor 


258 


Soup Bowl, Turtles 


Alice B. Sharrard 


259 


Freesia 


Harriette B. Burt 


260 


Decorated Porcelain 


Matilda Voorhees 


261 


Vase, Egyptian Motif 


Edna Mann Shover 


262 


Plate 


Henrietta B. Paist 


263 


Marmalade Jar 


Craftsmen's Guild 


264 


Crown and Trumpet Narcissus 


Photo by Walter S. Stillman 


265 


Blue and Wliite Plates 


Yukcy R. Tanaka 


266 


French. Tube Rose 


Harriette B. Burt 


267 


Cherry Blossoms 


Lillian Sturges 


268 


Answers to Correspondents. 




268 



iS 



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The thousands of these EJltxB in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LmXE TO OPERATE 




The only fuels which give perfect results in ~ 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 StzeU z 12 In. $30.00 ) / No. I SIm 10 x 12 to. $16.00 

No.3 Sl.eI6xl9in 40.00 G« KHa 2 ,Jz«. Ch«co.I Kfln 4 sixes. 2" ^ flTlf'^^ S^S 

] No. 3 Size H X tS to. 2&00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 SUeiixU to. s&M 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



9> 



Vol. XIV. No. 12. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



April 1913 




VERY movement has its rise and fall, 
its tidal fluctuations. If it is but a 
momentary fantasy it has seemingly 
but the one period of popularity and 
then it disappears to rise again in 
another guise, another fad of the 
moment. But if at bottom is a 
fundamental truth, a real and up- 
lifting principle, it never disappears 
utterly but waxes and wanes like the 
moon, gaining fresher and greater strength after every eclipse. 
So it has been with the amateur ceramic movement in this 
country. It started, as we older ones remember, with huge 
flowers painted "as large as life and twice as natural," pasted 
on the center of plates with never a shadow to relieve their harsh- 
ness, not a sparing of a single detail. Crude as was this first 
impulse, back of it lay deep in woman's heart the desire for 
the beautiful to be expressed in a practically indestructible med- 
ium. As fingers grew more expert the naturalistic painting 
on china grew still more realistic till the acme of ceramic 
painting on china was reached about in the days of the old "Art 
Amateur" and "China Decorator." Then doubts as to the 
fitness of realistic painting as decoration for china began to 
creep in here and there and for a time china decoration was 
on the wane. Then one began to see Rococo scrolls flourish- 
ing here and there and slowly but surely the idea of china 
decoration rather than painting began to take hold. 

It was at this time that Keramic Studio succeeded the old 
"China Decorator," and a look over its files will reveal quite 
clearly the steady upward march of the movement, which 
however has been so unprecedently rapid that not all have 
been able to keep up with its strides. For this reason there has 
been a slight waning of interest on the part of the great mass of 
decorators who have not been able to understand the rather 
crude "blocked out" designs that were in vogue for a time when 
ceramic designers were feeling about for first principles, such 
as mass of dark and light, spacing, movement, etc., etc. But 
now we are beginning to find our own again. Decoration is 
becoming not only more conventional, but more symbolic, it 
stands for more beauty in line and form and color, than ever 
before, and daintiness, though in new forms, is returning again. 
We look for the oncoming wave with happy anticipation and 
not without some satisfaction that Keramic Studio has done its 
part in bringing about the new spirit. 

Several important new additions to amateur ceramic ma- 
terial in the way of soft toned, grounding colors and enamels 
will do wonders to lighten the difficulties of our struggling young 
workers. Without a doubt, they are harbingers of a new 
spring time in ceramic work and as in the spring a young man's 
fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love, so in this new spring 
time of ceramic opportunity, the young woman's fancy will 
turn, but not lightly we trust, to thoughts of the beautiful 
things she can now make to keep the young man's fancy fixed, 
if not on thoughts of love, at least on thoughts of the attractive- 
ness of food served up in dishes decorated with these new and 
lovely designs and colors, for springtime passes into summer and 
fancy changes to serious thoughts and we all know that in 



maturity a man's heart is in his stomach. Which only goes to 
prove that the stronghold of the china decorator is tableware 
rather than purely decorative pieces. But do not forget to 
keep it simple enough so that the food it is meant to set forth 
is not over shadowed by the decoration. For after all eating is 
the chief end of man, and man is the chief interest of woman, 
in spite of these days of sufl'ragettes and politics. 

And talking of spring passing into summer it is almost 
time to begin to plan for the coming season. What are you 
going to do with your vacation? We will ask all our readers 
who expect to have summer schools or classes to send us 
notices for our May issue, so that our students will know what 
to plan for in the way of study. As for ourselves, our summer 
school of last year was so successful that we are going to have 
it again, and we shall continue the feature of children's classes 
in various crafts which will solve the problem for many mothers 
who do not know how to study and look after their little ones 
at the same time. Watch for the May issue. We hope to 
make it interesting to you in more ways than one. 

THE PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION 

THE Panama-Pacific International Exposition which is to 
be held at San Fi'ancisco in celebration of the comple- 
tion of the Panama Canal will open its doors to the public on 
Saturday, February 20, 1915. 

Although two years in advance of the opening day, progress 
upon the Exposition has reached a stage of accomplishment in 
all its departments which, in the opinion of expert observers, 
has not been exceeded by either of the last two gi'eat exposi- 
tions a year before their openings. The exposition grounds, 
which cover an area of 625 acres, have been prepared. Work 
has started and the headquarters building is completed. 

Contracts for the main exhibit palaces, of which there 
will be fourteen, will be let at the rate of two each month, and 
all the buildings will be completed under contract by June 
25th, 1914. 

Twenty-six American Commonwealths have selected sites 
for their State buildings. The following foreign Govei-nments 
have thus early accepted the invitation of the President to 
take part in the Panama-Pacific Exposition: Guatemala, Haiti. 
Salvador, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Panama, Mexico, 
Peru, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Japan, Ecuador, Uruguay, Canada, 
Liberia, France, Nicaragua, Cuba, Great Britain, China, Port- 
ugal, Sweden, Holland, Spain, Denmark, Argentine Republic. 

More than two thousand applications for concessions have 
been received by the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Fran- 
cisco; fourteen of the accepted concessions will involve an 
expenditure of more than two million dollars. Among the 
concessions will be a reproduction of the Grand Canyon by 
the Santa Pe Railway; a working model of the Panama Canal 
with a capacity to accommodate two thousand people every 
twenty minutes; a panoramic spectacle of the evolution of the 
American Navy; a reproduction of the Grand Trianon at 
Versailles, reproducing the historic battles of Napoleon, and 
the^Creation, based on the fh-st chapter of Genesis. All the 
concessions will be educative. 



248 



UERAMIC STUDIO 



POMPANO FISH PANEL (Supplement) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
'T^HE brown outlines are painted with a Dark Brown, a 
-■- little Violet and Grey for Flesh. The blue outlines are 
Banding Blue and a httle Grey for Flesh. Second Fire— The 
greens are Yellow Green and Albert Yellow, with a little Grey 
for Flesh for the darker tones. The violet tones in the body 
of the fish are Violet No. 2 and a little Sea Green, the dark 
blue is Aztec Blue and a little Violet and Black. The gold 
color is Albert Yellow, Yellow Brown and a little Auburn. 
The light blue is Deep blue Green and a little Violet. 



HELPFUL HINTS 

Every pupil coming to me from other teachers has ironed 
her silk for padding. This should never be done as the unironed 
silk has just that "grip" to it that the piece needs. 

In transferring a difficult "repeat" to a piece of china, I 
always paste the design to the carbon paper with a bit of 
adhesive tape. This is a great help especially on rounded 
surfaces. 

In spring and fall before fires are lighted and I want to 
use gold I fill my hot water bottle and place it beside me where 
I can lay the gold glass on it when a little heat is necessary to 
make it mix properly. Elinor Brierley 




BONBONNIERE (Supplement)— OPHELIA FOLEY 



PAINT in the outline and all the black spaces with Black 
and fire. Second Fire — Oil the grey tones in the border 
in the circle in the center, and the head and tail of the grey 
fish and dust with one-half part Violet No. 2, four parts Pearl 
Grey, two parts Ivory Glaze. Oil the body of the light fish 
and dust with three parts Pearl Grey, one part Violet No. 2, 
one-half part Deep Blue Green. 



Oil the dark green background and the bottom of the box 
if a dark green is desired and dust with one part Shading 
Green, one part Apple Green, one part Pearl Grey, one-half 
Grey for Flesh. The light green is painted with Moss Green 
and a little Yellow; the red tone is Blood Red, a little Violet 
and Dark Brown. The head of the dark fish Moss Green and a 
little Grey for Flesh. Silver can be used for grey parts of fishes. 




BONBONNIERE — Ophelia foley 
POMPANO FISH PANEL — H.bridwell 



APRI 1_ 1913 
SUPPLEMENT TO 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



249 



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VASE, EGYPTIAN MOTIF (Page 262) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

OUTLINE is Black. The bands and all the heavy black 
spaces are gold. The upper sections of wing is Orange 
Lustre and the two lower sections are Yellow Lustre. The 
small spaces between the circles of the sun and also the lower 
section of body and the space outlining the upper section are 
painted with two parts Apple Green and one part Yellow 
Green, the larger spaces are Yellow Lustre. 

Upper section of body is Banding Blue and Aztec Blue. 
Background space back of wings is Light Green Lustre applied 



rather heavy. Remainder of background is Dark Green 
Lustre. Legs of the figure are gold. 

PLATE (Page 263) 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

ABSTRACT design in gold. Basket ivory color. En- 
amels for fruit: "Marwine" for grapes; Grey Green, 
leaves; Dull Yellow, shaded with Grey Green, for pears; same 
shaded with Deep Red Brown for peaches. Outline the 
design carefully first and fire. 




POETAZ NARCISSUS— PHOTOGRAPH BY W. S. STILLMAN 
Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 



PAINT the background in first with Apple Green, Painting 
Yellow, Mauve; then the white flowers are shaded with a 
little of the Painting Yellow, and Apple Green; the centers are 
Yellow Brown, a little of Yellow Red; leaves are Yellow Green, 
Brown Green. For the yellow flowers use Painting Yellow 



and Albert Yellow, shading with Yellow Brown and Brown 
Green. 

Second Fire^Paint a thin wash of Apple Green over the 
entire background, then strengthen the centers of flowers with 
Albert Yellow, Brown Green. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



251 




NARCISSUS— HARIETTE B. BURT 



(Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry) 



OUTLINE the design with Grey for Flesh and fire. Then and Grey for Flesh. 
paint in the grey in flowers with Apple Green and Third Fire.— Paint a thin wash over the entire background 

Mauve. The centers are Painting Yellow, Yellow Brown and of Painting Yellow, a little Brown Green near the flowers, then 

Yellow Red. The leaves are Apple Green, Yellow Green, and paint a thin wash of Albert Yellow and Yellow Green over the 

Shading Green. Backgi'ound is Yellow Brown, Yellow Red shadow side of the flowers. 



252 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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RERAMIC STUDIO 



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SECTION OF TEN INCH SERVICE PLATE 




PLATE— MRS. F. R. WEISKOPF 



(Treatment page 256) 



254 



HERAMIC STUDIO 



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RERAMIC STUDIO 



255 




NUT BOWL (INSIDE)— MAY B. HOELSCHER 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



ALL of the darkest spaces are Gold and the outhne Auburn 
or Hair Brown and Grey for Flesh. Oil the gi'ey in 
all of the bands and dust with two parts Pearl Grey, one part 
Grey for Flesh, one part Yellow Brown. Paint the lower part 
of the acorns with a flat wash of two parts Yellow Brown, one 



part Albert Yellow and a little Dark Brown. The upper part 
of the acorn with a Dark Brown. Leaves are Brown Green 
and a little Yellow Brown, the heavy vein is Brown Green and 
a little of the Dark Brown. Oil the background and dust with 
one-half Grey Yellow, three parts Ivory Glaze. 



256 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



DINNER SET— F. R. WEISKOPF 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

TRACE in the design. Oil the outer 
band and the large grey space in the 
circle design and dust with three parts 
Ivory Glaze, two parts Apple Green and 
a touch of Yellow. Paint the three large 
remaining spaces in the circle design and 
the oblong space in the second border 
with three parts Yellow Brown, one part 
Albert Yellow and a little Yellow Red; 
this should be a strong orange color. The 
remainder of the design is in Gold. 




CUP AND SAUCER— F. R. WEISKOPF 




CUP AND SAUCER 
Mrs. Georgia Dennison Kimmons 

FIRST Fire— Outline design in black, 
dry thoroughly. Band, Brown Green 
toned with Black. Colors, either flat or 
enamel, taking care not to over run outline. 
Second Fire — Same treatment as above 
only fire outline first before laying in 
colors. 



CUP AND SAUCER— MRS. GEORGIA DENNISON KIMMONS 



hekamic studio 



257 




COTTAGE TULIPS, PINK AND WHITE— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 



PINK flower, use Rose very thin, shaded with Blood Red 
and Mauve. White flower, use Apple Green very thin 
and Rose, shade to the stem with Painting Yellow. Stems are 
Apple Green; leaves are Yellow Green, Shading Green and 



Brown Green. Background, Albert Yellow, Yellow Green and 
a little Mauve. Second Fire — Same colors used in first fire. 
Over the pink fiower paint a thin wash of Rose, shade it with 
Mauve and Rose. 



258 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




HONEY JAR— CLARA L. CONNOR 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 




OIL the gi-ey tones and dust with one part Grey Yellow and 
three parts Ivory Glaze. Oil the leaves and dust with 
three parts Pearl Grey and one part Apple Green. 

Outline the parts indicated with Green Gold, also the 
stamen of the flowers and the stem between the leaves. 

Second Fire — Paint the flowers with a thin wash of Blood 
Red and a little Yellow Brown. Flow a heavy wash of Opal 
lustre over the background. 

SOUP BOWL, TURTLES 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

THE outlines, head and feet of turtle, and the three bands 
are Gold. Oil the space between the turtles and dust 
with one part Grey Yellow, one part Yellow Brown, three parts 
Ivory Glaze. Oil the bodies of the turtles and the space above 
them and dust with three parts Ivory Glaze, one part Albert 
Yellow, one part Yellow Brown. 



DESIGN FOR COVER OF HONEY JAR 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



259 



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RERAMIC STUDIO 




FREESIA— HARRIETTE B. BURT 



Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 



INDIA ink the design very carefully, then paint in the kind of a wash of Painting Yellow, a little Apple Green and a 

background wath Grey for Flesh and Mauve; then the touch of Mauve. The second fire is a thin wash of Apple 

leaves are Yellow Green and Brown Green; the stems are Green over the entire background and the leaves. The flowers 

Shading Green and a little Black; the flowers are the thinnest are shaded on the shadow side with Mauve and Apple Green. 



REKAMIC STUDIO 



261 








DECORATED PORCELAIN— MATILDA VOORHEES 
Exhibited with the National Society of Craftsmen, New York 



262 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




VASE, EGYPTIAN MOTIF— EDNA MANN SHOVER 



(Treatment page 250) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



263 



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heramic studio 




MARMALADE JAR— CRAFTSMEN'S GUILD 



Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 



OIL the dark fruit and the dark part of the hght one and 
dust with three parts Ivory Glaze, one part Grey Yel- 
low, one part Yellow Brown. Oil the leaves and bands and 
dust with two parts Pearl Grey, one part Grey for Flesh, two 
parts Yellow Brown, and a pinch of Blood Red. Outline the 



light fruit with Grey for Flesh. Second Fire — Oil the entire 
surface of jar and plate and wipe the oil from the light fruit, 
then dust with one part Ivoiy Glaze, one part Pearl Grey, one- 
half part Yellow Brown. Paint the light fruit with Albert 
Yellow and a little Grey for Flesh. 



RERAMIC STUDIO 



265 



FRENCH TUBEROSE (Page 267) 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

FIRST Fire.— Outline the design with Grey for Flesh, then 
fire. Secon-d Fire. — Paint the background with Mauve 
and a Uttle Apple Green, Painting Yellow, and Grey for Flesh. 



with Apple Green and Rose, the yellow centers are Yellow for 
Painting. The leaves are Yellow Green and Shading Green, 
stems are Apple Green and Mauve. 

Third Fire. — Use the same colors as used in the first fire. 
The high lights are left in the flowers. Use a delicate wash of the 
Mauve and the Apple Green on the shadow side. Wash a 



The flowers are painted with Brown Green and Mauve shaded thin shading of Mauve around the flowers. 




CROWN AND TRUMPET NARCISSUS— PHOTOGRAPH BY WALTER S. STILLMAN 
Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 



FLOWERS are Painting Yellow, Albert Yellow, Yellow 
Brown; the centers or cups are Yellow Brown and Yel- 
low Red. Leaves are Moss Green, Shading Green. Back- 
ground, Yellow Green, Mauve, Grey for Flesh. 



Second Fire — Same colors used in the first fire. Shade 
the shadow side of the flowers with Brown Green and a little 
Yellow Brown. 

For the centers use Yellow Red. 



266 



RERAMIC STUDIO 




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267 




FRENCH TUBEROSE— HARRIET B. BURT 



(Treatment page 265) 



268 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CHERRY BLOSSOMS— LILLIAN STURGES 

Treatment by Kathryn E. Cherry 

OUTLINE the design with Apple Green and fire. Paint 
the leaves with Apple Green, Yellow Green, and a little 
Shading Green in the deepest tones, the blossoms are shaded 



with Apple Green and a little Rose, the stamens are Albert 
Yellow and Brown Green. 

Third Fire.— Oil the background with the Special Oil, 
dust it with Green Glaze, clean out the blossoms. 
^ If 
PLATES— YUKEY R. TANAKA (Page 266) 
Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 
"C*OR the large plate in the foreground, oil the border and 
-*- dust with three parts Ivory Glaze, one-half Grey Yellow 
Second Fire— Trace in the design and paint branches of trees 
with a thin wash of Auburn or Hair Brown, a little Violet and 
a touch of Black. The pine cones with Moss Green and a 
little Yellow Brown and pine needles with Shading Green, a 
little Moss Green and a touch of Black, the dark spots in the 
background with Grey for Flesh, a little Auburn Brown and a 
touch of Black. 

Third Fire— Wash in the dark grey background with Grey 
for Flesh and Pearl Grey and a very little Apple Green. 
SMALLER PLATE IN BACKGROUND 

Paint the border with a soft ivory tone using Pearl 
Grey, a little Albert Yellow and a touch of Yellow Brown 
Second Fire — The outline around the chrysanthemums Deep 
Blue Green two parts, Copenhagen Blue one part; the outline 
around the bands is the same but applied heavier. Leaves 
are Sea Green and a little Violet for the grey tone and add a 
little Shading Green for the darker tone. The small flowers 
are a very thin wash of Blood Red for the lighter tones and a 
little heavier wash of it for the darker tones. Bands are Deep 
Blue Green and a little Sea Green, the grey background is a 
thin wash of two parts Pearl Grey and one-half part Grey for 
Flesh. 

SHOP NOTES 

M. T. Wynne of New York will remove. May 1st, to lar- 
ger quarters, at 52 West 36th Street. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

E. B. G. — The special oil is padded when a large surface is to be covered 
and on the small surfaces it is painted on very thin, a little color is usually 
added to the oil to enable one to see whether it is being applied evenly. Special 
tinting oil and grounding oil are used for the same purpose but the former is 
more satisfactory, it is not as heavj' — gives a better quality to the color. It 
should usually be allowed to stand awhile, although that depends largely on 
the weather and the way it is apphed — usually in the summer it is not neces- 
sary to allow it to stand. The color should look dry after it is dusted on. 
MuUer & Henning's Outlining Black is the best to use for outlining. India 
ink does not fire, it is only used for correcting your design and needs to be 
gone over with black paint. 

P. F. — An ivory tone fires out if fired too hot so that may possibly be the 
cause of j'our tint not being satisfactory unless it fired darker than you wanted 
it, in that case you probably used the color too heavy and there would be no 
way of making it lighter except to take it off with a china eraser and apply it 
again. If it is too light you can go over it again with the same color. 

A. G. D. — For haw apples use a thin wash of Yellow Red and Blood Red 
for the light part and for the shadow side use Blood Red and a little Violet ; 
for the pronged cap use Blood Red and Auburn or Dark Brown. For blue- 
berries use Sea Green and a Deep Blue Green for the Ughts and Banding 
Blue, Sea Green and Copenhagen Blue for the shadow side. 

M. S. C. — The best decoration for a dinner set for a beginner would be 
a simple conventional border design in gold and a touch of color. You will 
find a number of these in the different manbers of the Keramic Sludio. Yes, 
the Haviland china is better than tlie Bavarian but there are other kinds of 
French china that are just as good. 

T. B. B. — If the gold was on Belleek ware it has probably been over-fired 
but if on china it is hard to tell the reason. It probably needs to be gone over 
again. In the treatment for grape border in the July number you are to 
dust the Pearl Grey over the colors that have been painted on when they are 
partly dry at least a couple of hours after it has been painted. 



WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF 
MAUD MYERS COLORS 

ONE TRIAL ONE VERDICT 

GOOD 

SPECIAL TRIAL OFFER, FIVE COLORS FOR $1.00 



Cerise 


(new) 


.40 


Wisteria 


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.25 


Willow Green 


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Mulberry 


(new) 


.35 


Louise Blue 


- - - 


.20 


Correspondence Classes, write for information about Class 


C, (Design). 


OUT-OF-DOOR WORK. 





OUTLINING INK 

SLEEPER'S GOLD 

SUPPLIES 



MYERS-CLAPP CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL 

487 SOUTH SAIINA STREET 

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Emancipate yourself from the use of corrosive and ill-amelling inks and adhesiyes, 
and adopt the Higgins Inks and adhcsives. They will be a revelation to you, 
they are so sweet, clean, well put up, and withal so efficieiit. 
At Dealers GenerallTr 

Chas, M. Eiiiins & Co., Mfrs., 271 Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

branches: CHICAGO, LONDON. 




WANTED 



Copies of Keramic Studio for July, Oct., Nov. 
and Dec., 191d, Jan., Feb. March, 1911. 

Quote price, postpaid, to this Compasiy 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO.. SYRACUSE. N. Y. 



WHITE CHINA 

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1212 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



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Highest grade china made for china painters 

Over seven hundred artistic shapes, glaze suitable 

for colors. Can be had of dealers. 

Send for Catalogue of shapes to manufacturers, 

New Jersey China Pottery Co. 

Trenton, New Jersey 



Border Patterns Surface Patterns 
Applied Designs 

Just Published— A SET OF TEN CARDS, 

giving some entirely new motifs, and some fresh 
applications of familiar motifs^ useful in your daily work. 

You should see these, and see them at once. 
Send us Fifty Cents and ask for 

Set No. 5 School Arts Drawing Cards 

SCHOOL ARTS PUBLISHING CO., 

Dept. M. BOSTON, U. S. A. 




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Sand far Priea Llet. IIM AUDITORIUM TOWER, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



CLASSROOM PRACTICE IN DESIGN 

By JAMES PARTON HANEY 

Director of Drawing, High Schools, Greater New York 







ONE OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS 

A concise, richly illustrated brochure on the teaching of applied design. 

An exposition of the principles that should underlie instruction in design 

in the public schools. 

Price, postpaid, 50 cents 



Wash Method of Handling Water Colour 

By FRANK FOREST FREDERICK 

Director of School of Industrial Art, Trenton, N. J. 

"This little book is a helpful guide and affords a stimulus to the use o 

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PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 
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THE MANUAL ARTS PRESS 
PEORIA P""'""*" -"l^r^i! Am ^°°^ °° *' ILLINOIS 



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USED WITH PEN ON CHINA DRY BY HEATING 

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NEW BOOKS 



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The Color Supplement '"*:^^fS:S'=„f*"*° 
Six Beautiful Cups and Saucers 

designed by Mrs* K. E* Cherry 

Send yotfl* order for a subscription beginning with May — the first 
ntmiber of the 1 5th volttmet and secttre this grotip 

It will also form the frontispiece of the BOOK OF CUPS AND 
SAUCERS aboiit to be published by this Company, 
Procurable only with Magazine or Book. Separate Copies will not 
be on sale I ! ,. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 
204 GifFofd Street Syracuse, N. Y. 



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